APPENDIX  IV

Work done by Co-operative Marketing Societies in the Amritsar District 1964-68

Co-operative year ending June

Number of  Societies

Membership

Paid-up share capital (in lakhs of  rupees)

Working Capital ( in lakhs of rupees)

Value of goods marketed ( in lakhs of rupees)

Societies

Individuals

Total

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1964

8

309

1578

1887

2.17

12.25

45.27

1965

8

377

1749

2126

2.94

14.60

49.05

1966

9

415

2209

2624

4.69

19.11

32.84

1967

9

515

2267

2782

6.25

32.56

5463

1968

11

575

2725

3300

6.90

44.88

349.74

(Source : Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Amritsar)

CHAPTER VII

COMMUNICATIONS

(a)

Old Time Trade Routes and Highways and Modes of Conveyance

(b)

Road Transport

©

Railways

(d)

Waterways, Ferries and Bridges

(e)

Air Transport

(f)

Travel and Tourist Facilities

(g)

Posts, Telegraphs and Telephones

(h)

Organisations of Owners and Employees in the Field of Transports and Communications

 

(a)  Old-time Trade Routes and Highways and Modes of Conveyance

 

            The economic development  of a country and the advancement of civilization depend upon a good system of communication. Roads are essential for the development of industries and agriculture and help to solve other economic problems. There are a number of references in Indian history to the construction of roads in the past and to the road policy adopted by different rulers. Chandragupt Maurya, Ashoka, Muhammad Tughlaq and Sher Shah are particularly known for the construction and maintenance of roads. The Grand Trunk Road, constructed by Sher Shah, runs across the Amritsar District.

 

(b)  Road Transport

 

            The pace of road construction was accelerated with the advent of the British rule. During the eighties of the nineteenth century, the principal roads in the district were: the Grand Trunk Road, the road from Amritsar to Zira and Faridkot, that from Amritsar to Gujranwala ( now in Pakistan), and that from Amritsar to Sialkot ( now in Pakistan ). Beside, there were unmetalled roads from Amritsar to Nawanpind and Saidoke towards Fatehgarh and Sri Hargobindpur ( in the Gurdaspur District) : and the road from Amritsar to Majitha.

 

            In 1914, the district had about 186 km of metalled roads. The construction of new roads was increased during the World War II (1939-45) and a number of old roads were repaired. At the time of the partition of the country in 1947, the Public Works Department maintained about 333 km of  roads in the district. In the post-partition period, there followed a rapid expansion of roads in the district as shown below :

 

Year

Metalled roads (km)

Unmetalled roads (km)

Total length of roads ( km)

1950-51

420

580

1000

1960-61

861

470

1331

1967-68

915

434

1349

 

            Roads are maintained by the Public Works Department, the Zila Parishad and the different municipal committees. Those maintained by the Public Works Department include the National Highway No.1, State highways, the district major and minor roads and other district roads.

 

(i)                Classification of Roads

 

The roads in the district are classified into the National Highway, the State highways, the district major roads, the district minor roads, other district roads, and the roads maintained by the Zila Parishad and the municipal committees.  

 

            The total road length maintained by the Public Works Department in the district, as on March 31, 1968, was 1281.24 km out of which 974.17 km was metalled and 307.07 km unmetalled. Most of the roads are maintained by the state public works department from the state funds, whereas the national highway is maintained by it out of the central government funds. The Zila Parishad maintains village road out of its own funds. The roads within the limits of the municipalities are maintained by the concerned municipal committees. A detailed description of each category of roads is given below :

 

            National Highways.__  These roads traverse the different states connecting ports, foreign highways, capitals of large states, large towns and industrial areas. The national highways are constructed and maintained by the state public works department out of the central government funds.

 

            The total length of the Grand Trunk Road, the national highway No. 1, passing through the district, is 77.68 km. This road in the Punjab is a continuation of that which runs through northern India to Delhi. Form there, passing through Karnal, Ambala, Ludhiana and Jullundur, it extends to Amritsar and to the border with Pakinstan.

 

            State Highways.__ The state highways are the main arteries of commerce and industry within a state and are connected with the national highways, district headquarters and important towns within the state. The state government maintains these roads out of the state funds. The state highways passing through the district measure 332.35 km.

 

District Major Roads.__  The roads connecting the various areas of production and important marketing centers with the railways, the state highways and the national highway in the district are called the district major roads. These roads are maintained by the state public works department. The total length of the district major roads in the district,as on March 31,1968, was 28.96 km.

 

District Minor Roads.__ These roads connect the towns, places of production, markets and villages within the district. They serve as important arteries of communication among the different parts of the district. These roads are also maintained by the state public works department. Their total length in the district, as on March 31, 1968, was 87.50 km.

 

            Other District Roads.__  Their total length in the district, as on March 31, 1968, was 621.90 km. These roads are maintained by the state public works deparment.

 

            Village Roads.__  These roads connect one village with another or a group of villages with the district and other roads. These roads are generally approach or link roads from the main roads to the villages. Some of these roads have been constructed through co-operative efforts of the villagers also. The constuction of link roads has been going on in the  state on January 21, 1968. These roads are maintained by the Zila Parishad, Amritsar. Their total length in the district, as on March 31,1968 was 420.99 km.

 

            Municipal Roads.__  The roads connecting the local markets, streets, state highways the national highway, the railway stations and other roads in the municipal area of a particular town are called municipal roads. These are maintained out of the municipal funds. Their total length in the district, as on March 31,1968, was 195.05 km, out of which 181.52 km was metalled.

 

(ii)              Vehicles and Conveyances

 

The old type of vehicles and conveyances are used freely in the district. These include bullock-carts, tongas, majjholis, wooden rehris, animals, etc. Domesticated animals are used for transportation according to the local needs of the inhabitants. Bullock-carts, camels, donkeys, etc. are also used for carrying foodgrains from the nearby villages to the markets in the towns. Most of these are used in the areas where the roads are uumetalled or sandy. To carry bricks, wood and other goods such as cloth and raw material, rehris are generally used. Some vehicles, as tampos and tongas, are also used for carrying agricultural produce and passengers from the villages to the towns.

 

            Tongas are quite popular in the towns for the transportation of passengers in the local area or to the nearby villages. A few well-to-do persons of Amritsar have their own tongas, which may even be occasionally driven by them for having a round in the city. Motor vehicles are also becoming popular in the district with the development and extension of roads. Cycles are used by the people, in general, and also by businessmen and hawkers to go to the villages from the towns. A remarkable feature of the post-independence period has been the decline in the number of tongas and ekkas drawn by horses. This is primarily due to the emergence of cyclerickshaws which are cheaper and easier to maintain. The horse-carts, how ever, still continue to be used in the countryside, though a few of these are seen in the towns. The number of different types of motor vehicles registered in the district during the last 5 years, i.e.1964 to 1968, is given in Appendix I on page 269.

 

            The Amritsar city and its suburbs are served by local buses, run by the Punjab Roadways, Amritsar.

 

            Automobiles.__  In the cities, motor cycles, scooters, jeeps and cars are becoming very popular with the well-to-do section of the people. Auto rickshaws and taxis are also used for quick transport and these are easily available and more convenient than the buses. The well-to-do people maintain their own cars.

 

            Cycles.__   This vehicle was introduced into India in the beginning of the twentieth century. Being a cheap and convenient means of transport, the cycle has become very common. It is used for covering short distances, according to local needs. It has increased the mobility of the people very much. The employees, teachers and students find in it a good and handy troansport. The milk vendors use it to bring milk to towns from the nearby villages.

 

            Cycle-rickshaws.__  Introduced after the partition of 1947, the cycle-rickshaw has become quite popular. It is a cheap, convenient and easy type of transport. Some rickshaw pullers purchase their own rickshaws, whereas others get it on hire. Owing to the popularity of this three wheeled vehicle, the importance of tongas and ekkas has decreased. The development of roads has also increased the mobility of cycle rickshaws from the towns to the adjoining villages and vice versa.

 

            The persons who are physically fit and are between the age of 18 and 45 can ply this vehicle according to the bye laws framed by the state government. Only two persons are allowed to sit on a cycle-rickshaw.

 

Horse Carriages.__  Horse carriages are used for transportation as well as for carrying passengers from one part of the city to another. These horse carriages, i.e. tongas and ekkas, are very useful means of communication for the villagers as well as for the local passengers in the towns. It is a cheap means of transport. These days, there is a keen competition between horse carriages, on the one hand, and the cycle-rickshaws, tampos, auto-rickshaws and buses, on the other. However, though an old type of conveyance, the horse-drawn carriages cannot be ousted completely.

 

(iii)  Public and Private Transport.__

 

            The introduction of passenger road transport is an important landmark in the history of the transport service. Before 1947, most of the major routes of transport were in the hands of private owners. But, after the independence, owing to the development and extension of roads, the state government gradually started nationalizing the road transport.

 

            The growth of road transport in the state during the post-independence period has been remarkable owing to the increase in the mobility of the people and the development of roads. Although the major routes in the district are operated by the Punjab Roadways, yet a good many routes are operated by private transport companies. Owing to the increase in the passenger traffic, it would have been rather impossible for the railways to cope with the rush of passengers. Therefore, the development and extension of road transport were both natural and essential. The road transport has connected the rural and the urban areas.

 

            Road transport has also increased with the rapid development of industries and agriculture. There has been an appreciable increase in the number of trucks which carry luggage and goods from one place to another.

 

            State-owned Services.__   Most of  the major routes in the district are operated by the Punjab Roadways, Amritsar, the details of which are given in Appendix II on pages 270-274.

 

            Private Bus Service.__  A good many routes of the district are operated by private transport companies. The particulars regarding the routes operated by them are given in Appendix III on pages 275-277.

 

(c)               Railways

Amritsar is an important railway junction on the Northern Railway, being connected by four branch lines, viz. Amritsar-Atari, Amritsar-Verka-Dera Baba Nanak, Amritsar-Patti-Khem Karan and Amritsar-Batala-Pathankot. The Amrtisar-Atari railway starts from Amritsar and runs westwards to Atari. The stations located on it are Chheharta, Khasa, Gurusar Sutlani, and Atari. The Amritsar-Verka-Dera Baba Nanak branch line has a junction at Verka on the way to Amritsar. It leaves the district at Fatehgarh Churian, and enters the Batala Tahsil of the Gurdaspur District, but re-enters the Ajnala Tahsil at Ramdas. The other stations on this line falling in the district are Majitha and Kotla Gujran. The Amritsar Patti-Khem Karan branch line runs southwards from Amritsar and the stations located thereon are Bhagtanwals, Sangrana Sahib, Gohlwar Varpal, Dukhnewaran, Tarn Taran, Rure Asal, Jandoke, Kairon, Patti, Boparai, Gharyala, Valtoha, Rattoke  Gurdwara  and  Khem Karan. The stations on the Amritsar-Batala-Pathankot branch line falling in the district are Verka, Kathunangal and Jaintipura. The main line from Amritsar to Delhi and onwards, viz. Amritsar – Saharanpur – Lucknow – Mughal  Sarai, is a double line. The stations on this line falling in the district are Mananwala, Jandiala Guru, Tangra, Butari, Baba Bakala, Rayya and Beas.

 

 

            The Appendices IV and V (pages 278 to 281) show the monthly average railway passenger and goods traffic and earnings during 1967-68.

 

            Rail-Road Competition.__  Before the advent of the motor transport in the beginning of the twentieth century, the railways enjoyed full monopoly in long-distance traffic. The road development was seriously retarded during the second half of the nineteenth century as roads were considered to be unprofitable. But the production of motor vehicles to be unprofitable. But the production of motor-vehicles on a large scale in the twentieth century gave rise to rail-road competition.

 

            Competition between the railway and road transport has been more acute than the competition between other forms of transport. The railways began to lose financially owing to the development of the motor transport after 1920 and especially during the period of the world-wide trade depression. The Government of India appointed in 1933 the Mitchell-Kirkness Committee to study the problem and make suggestions. After making a thorough enquire, the Committee reported that on account of the competition from passenger traffic alone, the railways were annually losing at the rate of two crores of rupees. It was feared that with the rapid expansion of motor transport, the earnings of the railways would be considerably reduced. During the World War II  (1939-45 ), there was practically no rail-road competition, as a good number of motor-vehicles were requisitioned by the Government for military purposes and the railways catered for traffic far in excess of their capacity. After the war ended, the fear of rail-road competition was aroused again as was witnessed by the promulgation of a rigid code of principles and practices for regulating the plying of motor-vehicles. The measures aimed at protecting the railway interests as a result of the financial stake of the Government.

 

            After the independence, the rail-road competition was reduced owing to the heavy taxation imposed on road vehicles and the nationalization of motor transport in several States. Motor transport is more flexible than the railways, as the former is capable of affording door-to-door service over short distances. It is also best suited to the transportation of certain types of commodities, e.g. eggs, vegetables and dairy products, to the near by markets. The railways have to provide for their own permanent way, station buildings, platforms, cabins, bridges, etc. which lead to heavy investment. Moreover, the road transport has improved much these days and people prefer to travel by bus than by rail, as the former is more convenient and serviceable than the latter.

 

            There is a good deal more of traffic moving by road than by rail. This is more pronounced in case of shorter haulages. The reasons for diversion to road traffic are lower freight rates, proper supervision, the absence of irksome formalities and door-to –door service. There has also been a greater expansion of roads than that of railways. However, for the transport of heavy machinery, bulky articles and also for long-distance haulages, there is a pronounced preference for railways.

 

(d)  Waterways, Ferries and Bridges

 

            Waterways.__  The three types of inland water transport are canals, rivers and lakes. All these had received a set-back owing to the rail and road transports. In the past, these means were utilized for the transportation of timber, etc. but they have now gone out of use.

 

            Ferries.__  Ferries are maintained by the Zila Parishad, Amritsar, wherever necessary.

 

(e)   Air Transport

 

This is the fastest, but the costliest means of transportation. Heavy investment has to be made on it. Raja Sansi is the only aerodrome in the district and is situated in the Ajnala Tahsil. It was taken over by the Director General of Civil Aviation in 1947. two airlines, viz. Indian Airlines and Ariana Afghan Airlines, operate flights to important places in the country and abroad.

 

(f)     Travel and Tourist Facilities

 

            Dharmshalas, serais and hotels are easily available in the important towns of the district for travelers, tourists and visitors. Thousands of visitors come to Amritsar to see the Jallianwala Bagh, Darbar  Sahib, Durgiana Mandir and other places of interest in the city. Among the serais and Dharmshalas at Amritsar, Guru Ram Das Serai and Durgiana Committee Dharmshala are worth mentioning. Besides, there are rest-houses and dak-bungalows for the use of Government officers/officials.

 

Dak-Bungalows and Rest-Houses,__  These are maintained by different  departments for the use of their employees during their visits to these places. A list of rest-houses, etc. in the district is given in Appendix VI on pages 282-283.

 

(g)   Posts, Telegraphs and  Telephones

 

Posts.  The Head Post Office at Amritsar, situated on the Court Road, also houses the Telegraph and Telephone Offices. Up to the eighties of the nineteenth century, the dak was sent by horse-drawn or by bullock-drawn train in the district.  Thereafter, it began to be carried by trains, buses and aero planes. At the important centers of the towns, letter-boxes have been affixed to provide postal facilities for the public and these are cleared at fixed timings, two or three times a day. In 982 villages in the district, dak is delivered daily, in 34 villages three times a week and in176 villages two times a week.

 

            On March 31,1968, there were 2 head post offices (one each at Amritsar and Tarn Taran), 71 sub post-offices, 332 branch post offices and 5 extra departmental sub-offices in the district. A list of these post offices is given in Appendix VII on pages 284-295.

 

            The Railway Mail Service Office, situated at the Amritsar Railway Station, serves as an intermediary for the exchange of mails with post-offices and the various running sections. The postal service in the district is quite fast and it is further improving day by day.

 

            Telegraphs.__  The Telegraph Office at Amritsar was established on March 1, 1930. It is located in the same building along with the Head Post-Office, Amritsar. The city area is also served by a good number of combined post and telegraph offices, the most important among which are Durgiana Mandir, Guru Bazaar, Gandhi Bazaar, Khalsa College and Majith  Mandi. There are 22 key-fitted sub offices and 24 phono-cum-sub-offices, but there is no phono-cum-extra-departmental sub-office or phono—cum-branch office in the district. The phonogram system is available to telephone subscribers, and telegrams are received from them on the telephone for onward transmission to the quarters concerned. There is a prompt delivery of telegrams in the district. Telegrams are also accepted round the clock from the people. Telegrams received for delivery are also telephoned to the subscribers.

 

            On March31, 1968, telegraph facilities were available in as many as 51 post-offices in the district, as detailed below :

 

Combined Post and Telegraph Offices

 

Amritsar

  1. Ajnala

 

  1. Atari

 

  1. Amritsar Kachahri

 

  1. Amritsar Basti Ram Dhab

 

  1. Amritsar  Durgiana  Mandir

 

  1. Amritsar Chawal Mandi

 

  1. Amritsar Guru Bazaar

 

  1. Amritsar Guru Ram Das Niwas

 

  1. Amritsar Gandhi Bazaar

 

  1. Amritsar Hide Market

 

  1. Amritsar Hindu Sabha College

 

  1. Amritsar Jawala Flour-Mills

 

  1. Amritsar Katra Sher Singh

 

  1. Amritsar Katra Karam Singh

 

  1. Amritsar Kot Rallia Ram

 

  1. Amritsar Khalsa Collage

 

  1. Amritsar Lawrence Road

 

  1. Amritsar Majith Mandir

 

  1. Amritsar Medical College

 

  1. Amritsar Nawan Kot

 

  1. Amritsar Northern Railway Locomotive Workshop

 

  1. Amritsar Rayon & Silk Mills

 

  1. Amritsar Sadr Bazaar

 

  1. Amritsar Sultanwind Gate

 

  1. Baba Bakala

 

  1. Beas

 

  1. Bhikhiwind

 

  1. Chheharta

 

  1. Chabhal

 

  1. Dera Baba Jaimal Singh

 

  1. Distillery Khasa

 

  1. Fatehabad

 

  1. Jandiala Guru

 

  1. Khem Karan

 

  1. Khalra

 

  1. Kairon

 

  1. Khanna Nagar

 

  1. Majitha

 

  1. Mahta Chowk

 

  1. Naushehra Pannuan

 

  1. Prit Nagar

 

  1. Patti

 

  1. Raja Sansi

 

  1. Ramdas

 

  1. Rayya

 

  1. Sultanwind EDSO (Extra Departmental Sub-Office)

 

  1. Sur Singh

 

  1. Sirhali Kalan

 

  1. Tarn Taran

 

  1. Verka

 

  1. Vairowal

 

 

Telephones.—In 1914, there was only one 50-line magneto exchange in the district, which was converted into 300-lines central battery system in 1922. It was converted into an automatic system in 1925. By the end of 1970, there were ten telephone exchanges in the district at Ajnala, Amritsar, Bhikhiwind, Chheharta, Khem Karan, Lopoke, Majitha, Patti, Rayya and Tarn Taran, all functioning under the Sub divisional Officer, Telephones, Amritsar.

 

            Almost all the important towns in the state are connected directly with the Amritsar Telephone Exchange, and also with the general telephone system in the country as a whole. A number of local public-call offices exist in the Amritsar city for the convenience of the public.

 

(h)   Organizations of Owners and Employees in the  Field of transport and Communications

 

There is no organization of owners in the field of transport and communications in the district. The transport workers/employees working in various transport companies have, however, formed their unions to look after their service interests. A list of such unions functioning in the district is given below :

 

(1)    Roadways Employees’ Association, Amritsar

 

(2)    New United Transport Workers’ Union, Amritsar

 

(3)   Punjab, Himachal Pardesh Motor Transport Workers’ Federation , Amritsar.

 

(4)    Pathankot-Amritsar Transport Worker’s Union, Amritsar

 

(5)    Transport Employees’ Union, Amritsar.


 

APPENDIX   I

 

Number of different types of motor-vehicles registered in the Amritsar District, 1964-68.

 

Year

Cars

Jeeps

Trucks

Taxis

Tractors

Buses

Motor cycles

Auto rickshaws

Miscel- laneous

1964

83

7

57

---

79

50

369

16

1

1965

82

8

50

2

80

45

370

16

1

1966

105

13

44

3

104

66

577

17

6

1967

107

14

40

4

102

68

580

16

10

1968

207

38

106

---

244

107

806

80

10

 

(Statistical Abstracts of Punjab, 1965 to 1969)

 


 

APPENDIX II

 

Bus routes operated by the Amritsar Sub-Depot of the Punjab Roadways, Amritsar

 

Serial No.

Name of route

Number of daily trips

Route length (km)

Total daily service (km)

  1.  

Amritsar-Chandigarh

1

231

462

  1.  

Amritsar-Delhi

1

443

886

  1.  

Amritsar Patiala (via Moga-Barnala)

1

269

538

  1.  

Amritsar-Ambala

1

251

502

  1.  

Amritasar-Ajnala

16

29

928

  1.  

Ajnala-Fatehgarh Churian

2

21

84

  1.  

Ajnala-Lopoke

3

22

132

  1.  

Ajnala-Bhindi-Saidan (via Bhindi-Aulak)

1

22

44

  1.  

Amritsar-ajnala-Lopoke

1

51

102

  1.  

Amritsar-Dera baba Nanak

5

61

610

  1.  

Amritsar-Jandiala Guru

14

18

504

  1.  

Amritsar-Vairwwal

4

43

344

  1.  

Amritsar-Wagha Border

9

31

558

  1.  

Amritsar-Bhikhiwind6

38

6

456

  1.  

Amritsar-Khalra

7

48

672

  1.  

Amritsar-Khalra-Patti-Harike

1

103

206

  1.  

Amritsar-Bhikhiwind-Harike

4 1/2

70

630

  1.  

Amritsar-Khem Karan

8

64

1024

  1.  

Khalra-Patti-Harike

1

54

108

  1.  

Amritsar-Kapurthala

3

67

402

  1.  

Amritsar-Sultanpur Lodhi

2

102

408

  1.  

Amritsar-Tarn Taran

15

21

630

  1.  

Tarn Taran- Pakhopura

3

29

174

  1.  

Amritsar-Sirhali Kalan

1

39

78

  1.  

Amritsar-Majitha

17

18

612

  1.  

Amritsar-Wachhoa

6

38

456

  1.  

Amritsar-Chogawan

7

23

322

  1.  

Amritsar-Chogawan-Saurian

1

28

56

  1.  

Amritsar-Chuchakwal

4

33

264

  1.  

Amritsar-Lopoke

7

26

364

  1.  

Amritsar-Jhander

1

32

64

  1.  

Amritsar-Sarangra

2

40

160

  1.  

Amritsar-Ranian

3

43

258

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Jandiala Guru

15

17

510

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Jandiala Guru Railway Station

3

20

120

  1.  

Amritsar-Patti

2

45

180

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Patti

4

22

176

  1.  

Amritsar-Valtoha

2

69

276

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Patti-Khem Karan

1

58

116

  1.  

Patti-Khem Karan

1

32

64

  1.  

Amritsar-Rasulpur

1

36

72

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Chandigarh

1

261

522

  1.  

Amritsar-Firozpur(via Talwandi)

7

127

1778

  1.  

Amritsar-Firozpur(via Patti)

2

144

576

  1.  

Amritsar-Firozpur(via Lohgarh)

4

117

936

  1.  

Firozpur-Fazilka

22

89

3916

  1.  

Firozpur-Jalalabad

1

55

110

  1.  

Fazilka-Pacca

1

13

26

  1.  

Firozpur ontonment-Hussainiwala Border

4

13

104

  1.  

Zira-Fatehgarh Panjtor

1

28

56

  1.  

Amritsar-Dera Baba Jaimal Singh

1

46

92

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Serai Amanat Khan

11

26

572

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Atari

2

40

160

  1.  

Amritsar-Fategarh Churian  (via Sangatpura)

2

27

108

  1.  

Fazilka Sirsa (via Abohar-Malaout)

1

159

318

  1.  

Amritsar-Hisar

1

401

802

  1.  

Amritsar-Chandigarh(via Moga)

1

266

532

  1.  

Amritsar-Bachiwind

3

35

210

  1.  

Amritsar-Dera baba Nanak-Gurdaspur

3

101

606

  1.  

Amritsar-Durangla-Bahrampur

1

128

256

  1.  

Gurdaspur-Dera Baba Nanak

1

40

80

  1.  

Amritsar-Faridkot

1

122

244

  1.  

Amritsar-hanumangarh

2 ½

69

345

  1.  

Amritsar-Borwadala

1

72

144

  1.  

Malaut-Muktsar

11

33

726

  1.  

Firozpur-Muktsar (via Faridkot)

3

81

486

  1.  

Fazilka-Abohar

7

35

490

  1.  

Abohar-Malaut

2

32

128

  1.  

Dabwali-Giddarbaha

1

32

64

  1.  

Dabwali-Malaut

6

32

384

  1.  

Amritsar-Prit Nagar

2

42

168

  1.  

Amritsar-Prit Nagar (via Khohali)

2

27

108

  1.  

Firozpur-Mamdot

5

25

250

  1.  

Amritsar-Naushehra Dhala

2

43

172

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Sobraon (Sabhra)

1

42

84

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Toothangala

1

45

90

  1.  

Dera Baba Nanak-Batala

3

30

180

  1.  

Dera Baba Nanak-Fatehgarh Churian

1

56

112

  1.  

Batala- Fatehgarh Churian

1 ½

25

75

  1.  

Muktsar-Bhatinda

9

54

972

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Vairowal

2

30

120

  1.  

Muktsar-Giddarbaha

2

42

168

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Dera Sahib

1

21

42

  1.  

Amritsar-Mahta

7

40

560

  1.  

Amritsar-Radaur Kalan

6

16

192

  1.  

Muktsar-Jalalabad

6

29

348

  1.  

Dabwali-Sirsa

1

59

118

  1.  

Malaut-Fazilka (via Pahiwala)

11

53

1166

  1.  

Firozpur-Zira

2

40

160

  1.  

Fazilka-Chutala

1

128

256

  1.  

Amritsar-Govindwal

4

45

360

  1.  

Amritsar-Bhatinda

2

190

760

  1.  

Amritsar-Bhatinda  (via patti)

1

205

410

  1.  

Patti-Fatehabad

2

37

148

  1.  

Abohar-Ganganagar

8

43

688

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Govindwal

3

24

144

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Govindwal (via Khadur Sahib)

1

28

56

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Fatehabad

1

18

36

  1.  

Fazilka-Sirsa (via Pahiwala)

2

144

576

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Bhikhiwind

6

32

384

  1.  

Amritsar-Tarn Taran(via Dhand-Kasel)

2

40

160

  1.  

Amritsar-Qadian

1

58

116

  1.  

Amritsar-Harchowal

2

67

268

  1.  

Amritsar-Mahta (via Sathiala)

1

54

108

  1.  

Amritsar-Butala

1

35

70

  1.  

Amritsar-Raja Sansi

24

21

1008

  1.  

Firozpur Cantonment-Firozpur City

24

6

228

  1.  

Tarn Taran-Ratta Gudha

1

34

68

  1.  

Abohar-Sangaria

2

53

212

  1.  

Sirsa-Hisar

1

90

180

  1.  

Firozpur-Muktsar (via Sadiq)

8

56

896

  1.  

Amritsar-Jalalabad

1

54

108

  1.  

Firozpur City-Jhoke Road Octroi Post

17

13

442

Local Routes

1.

Amritsar-Verka

24

9.0

432.0

2.

Amritsar-Gohalwar (via Varpal)

6

15.0

180.0

3.

Amritsar-Raipur Kalan

8

19.2

307.2

4.

Amritsar-Chheharta

70

11.0

1540.0

5.

Islamabad-Kaimpura

40

12.8

1024.0

6.

Amritsar-Raja Sansi

24

21.6

1036.8

7.

Chowk Fawara-Sacred Heart High School

31

12.0

744.0

8.

Chatiwind Gate-Gurdwara Chheharta Sahib

28

11.2

627.2

9.

Amritsar-Jagdev Kalan

1

19.2

38.4

10.

Amritsar-Kathunangal-Chawinda Devi

7

22.4

313.6

11.

Amritsar-Chogawan

15

23.2

696.0

 

(Source : General Manager, Punjab Roadways, Amritsar)

 

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