Employment Market Information Scheme – The scheme for the collection of employment market information was introduced as one of the development schemes under the second five year plan ( 1956-61). It has been designed to ensure that adequate man power man-power data is made available to the Planning and Development Departments, authorities concerned with technical education and vocational training, bodies responsible for imparting vocational guidance and the employment service itself to serve as a basis for its continued development. It is also intended to supply comprehensive information to persons  seeking work and to employers seeking workers. It gives on a continuing basis  as appraisal of trends and conditions in as employment market are, the relationship between the supply and demand for workers, the occupational and industrial disposition of the labour free and the type of personnel that are persistently in short supply.

 

            Introduced into the State in 1957-58, the scheme is operated under the Director of Employment, Punjab, Chandigarh. Intially, it covered only the public sector, but, from 1960-61. It was also extended to the private sector.

 

            Under the Employment market Information Scheme, The data is collected from all the public sector establishments and those employing 10 or more persons in the private sector (but including all registered factories irrespective of the number of their employees ). In case of construction activity, the coverage is restricted to only those engaged in contract work on public account. The information, however, limited to only whole time employees; part-time employees or independent workers are not covered.

 

            A comparative analysis relating to the volume of employment, bot in private and public sectors, as in December 1967 and December 1968, is given below :

 

 

 Industrial Division

No. of establishments

No. of employees

December

1967

December

1968

December

1967

December

1968

Manufacturing

..

75

72

14939

14483

Trade and Commerce

..

40

41

1607

1511

Transport, Storage and Communication

..

28

29

6452

6476

Services

.

297

303

22471

23155

 

            The above table reveals that with the exception of transport, storage, communication and services, the employment decreased in manufacturing, trade and commerce. The maximum increase,  as shown under services, was due to the expansion in the educational, medical and health services. The decrease in employment relating to manufacturing was effected in the art- silk industry as a result of the shortage of raw material needed by the industries.

 

            Vocational Guidance Scheme- Vocational guidance is a development of the twentieth century and is typical of the complicated pattern of modern civilization. In India, the need for vocational guidance has been felt since long. In order to give it a concrete shape, a committee headed by Shri Shiv Rao, popularly called the Shiva Rao Committee, was appointed. It submitted its report on April 28, 1954. The Training and Employment Service organisation Committee, inter alia, recommended a wide range of functions for the Employment Echanges, viz. The collection of employment market information, employment counselling, occupational research and anlysis and occupational testing. The recommendations of this committee were implemented in the Punjab in the Second Five Year Plan. Each District Employment Exchange, functioning at the district headquarters, has a Vocational Guidance Section, which functions under the immediate supervision of an Employment Counsellor. The Vocational Guidance Unit at Amritsar was set up on February 1, 1961.

 

            The vocational guidance programme is jointly operated by the Directorate of Employment Exchanges of the Union Ministry of Labour and Employment and the Directorates of Employment in the States. The Ministry of Labour and Employment, through the Director of Employment Exchanges, is responsible for the general policies and procedures. The Director is also responsible for the training of special staff, the preparation of tools and materials for the services and for coordinating the service at the national level with the guidance Service under the educational authorities. The State Directorate of Employment administers and service through Employment Exchanges, co-ordinating if with the Guidance Service of the Educational Department of the State Government.

           

The functions of the Vocational Guidance Unit are : to provide vocational guidance and employment counselling for the youth and adults in groups and individually, to assist in the placement of the youth in institutions or establish training centres, apprenticeship or entry jobs and to follow up and review the progress of the guided youth and adults. It also assists in collection and compilation of uo-to-date and accurate information on occupations, training facilities , educational courses, employment trends and employment outlook for disseminating to adults and other groups. It maintains a regular and well-equipped occupational information room for the use to applicants and visitor seeking information, and educates the public by under- taking publicity measures in vocational guidance principles with a view to encouraging community consiousness.

 

            The Employment Counsellor, on invitation, visits schools and colleges to give talks on different carrers. These talks cover educational and training facilities and job opportunities available in the area and emphasize the importance of vocational planning. He renders all possible assistance to the educational authorities in organizing career conferences, career exhibitions, parents meetings and other guidance programmes.

 

            The following table shows the work done by the Vocational Guidance Unit at Amritsar during 1965-1968:

 

 

 

 

                  Year

Number of individuals provided for

Group guidance talks

Individual guidance cases

Individual information

1965

..

146

142

967

1966

..

148

111

149

1967

..

89

47

214

1968

..

20

6

32

 

 

(C)      Planning and Community Development

 

 

            Planning -       The rural life in India has been organized on the community basis since very early times. The British discovered a powerful community organization in the villages functioning from time immemorial. Under the British rule, however, the old pattern of rural life in India disintegrated . The development of transport removed the isolation and economic self sufficiency of the rural community organizations. The partition of the country in 1947 and the consequent wholesale migration of the non Muslim population from the West Punjab (Pakistan) gave another serious jolt to the rural community life. The whole economy of the district was seriously shattered. An acute shortage of labour and capital was felt in the industrial sector. The newly constituted State of Punjba (India) experienced deficit in agricultural priduction, because the fertile and surplus areas were left behind in Pakistan. In order to check the economic deterioration efectively, planned development on a country wide scale was undertaken by the Government of India was entrusted with the task of drawing up the Five -Year Plan. Due stress was to be laid on the improvement of all the sectors, especially agriculture, in view of the pressing food problem created in the country as a result of the partition. During the period of planned development, from 1951-52 to 1960-61, covering the first two Five Year Plans, the district regained its stability in a large measure. Against this background, it became possible for the Government to lay more stress on industry in the third Five year Plan (1961-66). Consideration surplus and waste lands were brought uder the plough. With the provision of extensive agricutural facilities and the use of improved types of implements and fertilizers, there has been a tremendous increase in the production of various agricultural comodities. With the introduction of modern agricultural implements, new scientific techniques and fertilizers, agriculture has been revolutionized in the new district.

 

            The Community development Project Scheme owes its origin to the recommendations of the Planning Commission. The main object of the scheme, according to the planning Commission, is to secure the fullest development of the material and human resources of the particular area of a district. The scheme makes a comprehensive approach to the social and economic aspects of rural life and includes within its scope activities relating to agriculture, education, co-operation, animal husbandry, minor irrigation, communications, employment, housing, cottage industries and social welfare.

 

            Community Development – The Community Development Programme was started to raise the living standard and to ameliorate the lot of the rural population. Amritsar is a progressive district in the field of agriculture. The entire district has been brought under the Community Development Programme and has 15 Blocks, wiz Verka, Jandiala Guru, Majitha, Rayya, Tarsikka, Patti, Bhilhifwind, Valtoha, Tarn Taran, Khadur Sahib, Nayshehra Pannuan, Chohla, Gandiwind, Ajnala and Chogawan. Appendix V on page 321 gives the category of the 15 Community development Blocks along with the area, villages and population covered by each of these.

 

            The people in the district have extended commendable co-operation and have also contributed liberally, as and when they were required to do so. The organisation of the Community Development Scheme has been largely responsible for bringing about a change of outlook in all spheres of life in the rural areas of the district. The farmers are now greatly enlightened about the latest methods of cultivation and improved agricultural practices. The community development has infused the spirit of self-help and self-reliance among the rural folk and widened their outlook.

 

            The detail regarding the people’s contribution to the community Development Programme in the different blocks in the Amritsar District, upto march 31, 1968, are given in Appendix VI on pages 322-323.

 

            The physical achivements of the Community Development Blocks in the Amritsar District, from the time of the inception of the scheme, are shown in Appendix VII on pages 324-325.


APPENDIX I

 

Sample household classification by the number of members and by the number of rooms occupied in the Amritsar District, as in 1961

(Vide page 305)

 

Total Rural / Urban 

Total numbers of household

Total numbers of members

Total number of rooms

Households with no regular room

Households with one room

Males

Females

 

Number of households

Number of members

Number of households

 

Number of members

Male

Female

Male

Female

1

 

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Rural

..

36041

111774

97362

83800

87

254

218

12683

31567

26712

Urban

..

17019

48390

39759

33876

54

134

58

8514

20481

15761

Total

..

53060

160164

137131

117676

141

388

276

21197

52048

42473

 


Appendix I- concld.

 

(Continued from pre-page)

 

Household with two rooms

Household with three rooms

Household with four rooms

Households with five or more room

Number of households 

Number of members

Number of households 

Number of members

Number of households 

Number of members

Number of households 

Number of members

Males

 Females

Males

Females

Male

Females

Male

Females

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

11016

33397

29385

6033

21106

18585

3169

12163

10521

3053

13287

11941

4501

13277

11473

1963

6599

5650

975

3564

3118

1012

4335

3738

15517

46674

40858

7996

27705

24235

4144

14727

13639

4065

17622

15679

 

(Census of India, 1961, Volume XIII, Punjab, Part IV-B, Tables on Housing and Establishments, pp. 414-415)


APPENDIX II

 

Rates of pay fixed for the class IV Government servants working in the Amritsar District during 1967-68 and 1968-69

 

Sr. No

Name of Post

 

Rate Fixed for 1967-68

Rate Fixed for 1968-69

Pay

D.A.

Remarks

 

 

 

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

 

1.

Bhishti

..

84.50

84.50

15.00

69.50

 

2.

Sweeper

..

114.50

114.50

45.00

69.50

 

3.

Pankha Coolie

..

114.50

105.50

35.00

69.50

 

4.

Tailor

..

143.50

143.50

62.50

81.00

 

5.

Head Cock

..

14.50

114.50

45.00

69.50

 

6.

Assistant Cock

..

109.50

109.50

40.00

69.50

 

7.

Head mochi

..

136.00

136.0

55.00

81.00

 

8.

Assistant mochi

..

19.50

19.50

50.00

69.50

 

9.

Lampman

..

14.50

114.50

45.00

69.50

 

10.

Bearer

..

117.50

17.50

48.00

69.50

 

11.

Head dhobi

..

119.50

19.50

50.00

69.50

 

12.

Assistant dhobi

..

114.50

114.50

45.00

69.50

 

13.

Mate khidmatgar/ cartman

..

99.50

99.50

30.00

69.50

 

14.

Cartman with his own bullock

..

19.50

119.50

50.00

69.50

 

15.

Kahaf/oilman/cleaner/dye attendent/ dak runner

..

99.50

99.50

30.00

69.50

 

16.

Weaver

.

163.50

163.50

82.50

81.00

 

17.

Barber/ waterman /mali

..

114.50

114.50

45.00

69.50

 

18.

Chowkidar

.

104.50

104.50

35.00

69.50

 

19.

Boatman

..

95.00

95.00

fixed

 

 

As recommended by the L.A.C., Amritsar

20.

Chairman

..

99.50

130.00

fixed

 

 

 

20.

Sweeper/ storeboy/ mali/ ploughman/ greasemen/ chowkidar/ khalasi/ mortar khalasi/ assitant welder/ coaltar- aprayer/ labourer

..

 

 

3.00

per day (now 3.50)

 

As reccomended by the Department

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sr. No

Name of Post

 

Rate Fixed for 1967-68

Rate Fixed for 1968-69

Pay

D.A.

Remarks

22.

Carpenter/ painter/ mechanic/ mason/ borer/electrician/ radio rapairer/ blacksmith/ turner/ tinsmith/ driver/ donkey man with four donkey / driver

..

..

6.00

per day

7.00

per day

 

As recommended by the Railway Department

23.

Tyreman/ vulcanizer/ starter / dent beater/ upholster/battery attendent /fitter

..

..

5.00

5.50

 

As recommended by the Railway Department

24.

Hamerman/ conductor/ assistant painter/ assistant mason/ welder/ caner

..

..

4.00

4.50

 

As recommended by the Railway Department

25.

Ticket verifier

..

..

4.50

4.50

 

As recommended by the Railway Department

26.

Moulder/ aligner/ aligner mistry/ mate skilled labourer/ waterman

..

..

3.50

4.00

 

As recommended by the Railway Department

27.

Ploughman with bullocks and plough

..

..

7.50

7.50

 

 

 

(Source: Deputy Commissioner, Amritsar.)

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX III

(Vide page 309)

 

Work done by the Sub-Regional Employment Exchange, Amritsar,

1958-59 to 1967-68

 

Year

Number of registration during the year

Number of vacancies notified

Number of applicants placed in employment during the year

Applicants on the live register at the end of the year

Monthly number of employers using the Exchange

Number of vacancies being carried over at the end of the year

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1958-59

14570

4149

2297

4794

84

390

1959-60

15736

3763

2126

5201

96

797

1960-61

16243

3090

2042

5389

58

695

1961-62

18843

4239

3179

5279

72

416

1962-63

21548

3986

2915

7502

91

409

1963-64

21045

5522

3682

4831

97

412

1964-65

21655

6135

4525

6832

81

383

1965-66

17138

4296

2640

6267

94

488

1966-67

18942

5569

3454

6203

71

611

1967-68

23671

5604

3570

8760

74

777

 

(Source : Sub-Regional Employment Officer, Amritsar)

 


APPENDIX IV

(Vide page 309)

 

Work done by the District Employment Exchange, Amritsar,

 

 

Year

Number of registration during the year

Number of vacancies notified

Number of applicants placed in employment during the year

Applicants on the live register at the end of the year

Monthly number of employers using the Exchange

Number of vacancies being carried over at the end of the year

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1961

511

167

30

245

7

15

1962

1229

417

195

270

7

15

1963

810

327

120

201

5

13

1964

1672

427

142

403

9

59

1965

2493

653

288

820

15

110

1966

2609

615

309

814

12

136

1967

3299

794

478

1383

16

170

1968

4396

954

612

1421

18

144

 

(Source : Sub-Regional Employment Officer, Amritsar)


APPENDIX V

Population, area, village and panchayats covered by the Community Development Blocks in the Amritsar District, as on March 31, 1970

 

( Vide page 314)

 

Sr. No.

Subdivision/Tahsil/Block

Date of start

Present stage

Population 1961

Area

(sq. km.)

Number of villages

Number of panchayats

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Amritsar Subdivision

1.

Verka

-- Ist October, 1962

II

103873

318.00

71

67

2.

Jandiala Guru

-- Ist October, 1962

II

72071

281.90

68

64

3.

Majitha

-- Ist April, 1962

II

68917

264.33

89

79

4.

Rayya

-- 2nd October, 1961

II

68538

172.80

78

67

5.

Tarsikka

-- Ist October, 1960

II

63257

251.60

81

71

Patti Subdivision

6.

Patti

-- ist October, 1957

III

53111

355.30

74

54

7.

Bhikhiwind

-- Ist October, 1957

III

65197

307.55

60

53

8.

Valtoha

-- Ist April, 1959

II

49652

147.00

68

45

Tarn Taran Subdivision

9.

Tarn Taran

-- 2nd October, 1953

II

77803

307.49

76

72

10.

Khadur Sahib

-- Ist April, 1957

III

66954

307.23

75

62

11.

Naushehra Pannuan

-- Ist April, 1957

III

62634

272.51

64

56

12.

Chohla

-- Ist April, 1957

III

56532

294.16

50

45

13.

Gandiwind

-- 2nd October, 1961

III

64120

342.25

74

66

Ajnala subdivision

14.

Ajnala

-- Ist October, 1958

III

77376

388.50

200

119

15.

Chogawan

-- Ist October, 1959

II

87254

525.44

189

89

 

( Annual Administration Report of the Development and Panchayat Department, Punjab, for 1969-70)


APPENDIX VI

 

People’s Contribution to the Community Development Programme in the

 

Sr. No.

Name of Block

Agriculture and animal husbandry

Irrigation and reclamation

Health and rural sanitation

Education

Social education

Comm-unity recreation  centres

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

 

 

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

1.

Verka

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.

Jandiala Guru

25580

10120

22220

23920

22620

-

3.

Majitha

-

-

20000

5000

13500

1250

4.

Rayya

2236

-

6707

36106

-

-

5.

Tarsikka

-

3000

-

30762

3470

-

6.

Patti

-

-

-

1350

-

-

7.

Bhikhiwind

182456

75482

285983

145419

75681

15420

8.

Valtoha

-

24500

41600

31930

25600

-

9.

Tarn Taran

2060

-

3500

7550

2800

9800

10.

Khadur sahib

22870

-

123479

107257

18459

13567

11.

Naushehra Pannuan

6689

-

32067

55120

5005

-

12.

Chohla

-

-

-

-

-

-

13.

Gandiwind

-

10000

45200

-

-

-

14.

Ajnala

10620

-

4000

4000

3220

-

15.

Chogawan

64855

6060

43484

88098

13331

-

 


different Blocks in the Amritsar District up to March 31, 1968

 

(Vide Page 314)

 

Communication

Village and small industries

Housing

Other works programme

Total

Cash and other contributions

Labour

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

Rs.

-

-

-

-

-

-

1000

22920

17000

-

-

144380

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

47308

-

-

59273

151632

121306

30326

-

-

 

-

37232

19851

25375

15000

-

-

-

16350

-

120

182425

64585

-

-

1027451

-

-

27400

23000

-

-

174030

-

-

4000

75000

-

-

104710

-

8975

87936

-

-

94870

468438

242578

28567

15322

-

-

-

114203

119399

12870

-

-

-

-

5000

-

-

16400

-

-

-

68900

50000

18200

6280

-

-

13274

41394

21530

19864

13916

-

-

-

229744

-

-

 


APPENDIX VII

 

Physical achivements of the community Development Blocks in the Amritsar District up to March 31, 1968

(vide Page 314)

 

 

Sr. No.

Name of the Block

 

Chemical fertilizers distributed (quintals)

Number of agricultural demonstrations held

Improved seeds distributed (quintals)

Number of maternity and child welfare centres

Number of rural latrines constructed

Number of wells sunk

Pucca drains constructed (km.)

Number of schools converted into basic ones

1

2

 

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1.

Verka

--

7413

-

1020

3

6

-

15

-

2.

Jandiala Guru

--

89039

30

945

1

-

120

-

64

3.

Majitha

--

20581

805

3720

5

2

809

3.6

3

4.

Rayya

--

49650

399

1129

2

25

-

1785

2

5.

Tarsikka

--

918920

-

923

2

36

-

1773

1

6.

Patti

--

2895

-

1758

6

-

-

480

1

7.

Bhikhiwind

--

150485

945

30485

15

208

3476

151

1

8.

Valtoha

--

294500

205

4750

1

-

-

1750

-

9.

Tarn Taran

--

53408

394

4279

52

16

6

-

-

10.

Khadur sahib

--

126946

3920

23051

-

11

163

2.01

-

11.

Naushehra Pannuan

--

50600

26

867

2

5

2

3877

-

12.

Chohla

--

56360

2

482

-

3

-

900

-

13.

Gandiwind

--

48500

10

380

1

85

-

5886

-

14.

Ajnala

--

72500

-

940

6

2

1

4000

-

15.

Chogawan

--

219489

1040

10410

-

7

32

9.3

-

 

(contd.)

 

 

 

APPENDIX VII- concld.

 

 (continued from pre-pages)

 

 

Sr. No.

Name of the Block

 

Chemical fertilizers distributed (quintals)

Number of agricultural demonstrations held

Improved seeds distributed (quintals)

Number of maternity and child welfare centres

Number of rural latrines constructed

Number of wells sunk

Pucca drains constructed (km.)

Number of schools converted into basic ones

1

2

 

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

1.

Verka

--

9

54

-

-

2

15

3

-

2.

Jandiala Guru

--

8

180

2

60

-

7

15

1

3.

Majitha

--

-

-

2

114

-

33

21

-

4.

Rayya

--

11

262

53

-

26

2

22

1

5.

Tarsikka

--

4

96

2

83

-

36

21.5

-

6.

Patti

--

1

6

12

93

2.75

20

40

10

7.

Bhikhiwind

--

12

1585

42

108

56.4

51.8

3.6

2

8.

Valtoha

--

1

-

-

27

-

4.5

12

-

9.

Tarn Taran

--

8

256

-

-

4.8

10.75

11

-

10.

Khadur sahib

--

45

943

43

71

27

248

237

-

11.

Naushehra Pannuan

--

7

150

-

-

-

17

3

7

12.

Chohla

--

-

-

2

-

-

11

36.1

-

13.

Gandiwind

--

-

-

-

--

18

51.5

45

3

14.

Ajnala

--

-

-

1

1

4

5

-

-

15.

Chogawan

--

-

-

1

166

58

24

9

-

 


 

Chapter  X

 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

(a)

Historical Background and the Divisions of the District

(b)

District Authorities

(c)

Development Organization

(d)

Panchayati Raj

(e)

General Arrangement for the Disposal of Business

(f)

District Committees

(g)

Other Important Offices

(h)

Other State and Central Government Officers

 

(a)   Historical Background and the Divisions of the District

 

The British rule had been fairly well established in the rest of India when the Punjab was annexed in 1849. the blue print of the administrative set-up for the Punjab had already been prepared during the governance of the cis-Satluj  territory. Variations, if any,were made to suit the local conditions and the special requirements of the trans-Satluj territories. The entire administration of the district revolved round the Deputy Commissioner. In case of big districts , a miniature  Deputy Commissioner, i.e. a Subdivisional Officer (Civil), was also posted by the British in other provinces. This latter practice was, however, not generally restored to in the Punjab and very few tehsils were raised to the status of subdivision. Thus, before the partition of 1947, the Amristsar District had no subdivision. But thereafter, all the four tehsils of the district were made subdivisions one after another.

 

The traditional revenue organization was not materially changed by the British. The lowest public servant in this field was the patwari or village accountant. The Deputy Commissioner as Collector was the highest revenue officer in the district and the same arrangement continues to this day.

 

The British Indian administration has primarily been organized for collecting revenues and maintaining law and order. Extensive plans for the development of the Indian economy were discounted. Instead the British authorities paid greater attention to the departments of Police, Jail, Judiciary, Land Revenue,etc. The only after department which received attention was the Public works, were confined to buildings required by the Government. The irrigation works were taken up to raise revenues, reduce famines, rehabilitate people and reduce the incidence of crime. It was only under the Reforms Scheme of 1919 that emphsis began to be laid on beneficent departments like Education, Health and Agriculture. With the introduction of the provincial autonomy in 1937 (under the Government of India Act,1935), the development departments received greater attention. It is certainly after the independence in 1947 that new ideas of public welfare have come to inspire the administration for all-round welfare of the people.

 

After the independence, the developmental activities have been extended to the village- hitherto overlooked. New circle, called blocks ,have been carved out for the purposes of development. On October 2,1952, the Community Development Programme was undertaken for intensive rural development. In the following year, the National Extension Service was inaugurated. The movements had identical aims and were merged into a single organization in 1956. The object of the Community Projects was to undertake development work in a selected rural area for three year- to construct roads, make better arrangements for sanitation, expand education and cultural life and for stimulate in every possible way local initiative and the sense of responsibility for the general development of the local community life. The National Extension Service is a permanent organization set up to bridge the gulf between the results of modern research in the fields of agriculture, co-operation, public-health, cottage industry and rural housing and the old-time practices and habits in rural life.

 

This development work has greatly added to the workload of the District Officer. It has also immensely changed the pattern of administration in the new democratic set-up, pledge to achieve the ideal of a modern welfare State. With the above background in view, the administrative set-up of the Amritsar District is detailed hereunder :

 

Administrative Division :- Administatively, the district is divided into 4 subdivisions, viz. Amritsar, Tarn Taran, Ajnala and Patti. Some of the areas, previously forming part of the Kasur Tahsil of the Lahore District  ( Now in Pakistan), were transferred to the Amritsar District in 1947. these were formed into a sub-tahsil  with headquaters in Patti. The sub-tahsil was made a full fledged tahsil in 1952, and a Resident Magistrate was posted  there for effective  administration. At present, all the four tahsils are subdivisions. The Patti Tahsil was made a subdivision in 19551, Ajnala in 1962, Tarn Taran in 1964 and Amritsar in 1965.

 

The number of police-stations in each sub-division is given below :

 

Subdivision

Number of Villages

Police-stations

Police-posts

Amritsar

389

1. Police-station  A Division

1.Police-post       Islamabad

 

 

2. Police-station  B Division

2. Police-post Lohgarh

 

 

3. Police-station  C Division

3. Police-post Durgiana

 

 

4. Police-station  D Division

4. Police-post Cantonment

 

 

5. Police-station  E Division

5. Police-post Majitha Road

 

 

6. Police-station  Civil Lines

6. Police-post Albert Road

 

 

7.Police-station Sadr Amritsar

7. Police-post       Chheharta

 

   1The Patti subdivision actually started functioning with effect from 20th July, 1965. 

 

AMRITSAR

 

Subdivision

Number of Villages

Police-stations

Police-posts

 

 

8. Police-station  Beas

8. Police-post Khasa

 

 

9. Police-station  Jandiala Guru

9. Police-post Verka

 

 

10. Police-station Kathunangal

 

 

 

11. Police-station  Majitha

 

Ajnala        ..

347

1. Police-station Ajnala

 

 

 

2. Police-station  Ramdas

 

 

 

3. Police-station  Lopoke

 

Tarn Taran

340

1. Police-station  City Tarn Taran

1. Police-post Gharinda

 

 

2. Police-station  Sadr Tarn Taran

2. Police-post Sur Singh

 

 

3. Police-station  Verowal

 

 

 

4. Police-station  Sirhali Kalan

 

 

 

5. Police-station  Jhabal

 

 

 

6. Police-station  Gharinda

 

 

 

1. Police-station Bhikhiwind

1. Police-post Khem Karan

 

 

2. Police-station  Khalra

2. Police-post Sabhra

 

 

3. Police-station  Valtoha

3. Police-post Kahangarh

 

 

4. Police-station  Patti

4. Police-post Kairon

 

The strengthen of Subdivisional Officers (civil), Tahsildars and Naib- Tahsildars in the district is as under:

 

Number of posts

Subdivision

Subdivisional Officer

       (Civil)

Tahsildar

Naib- Tahsildar

Amritsar

1

1

5

Tarn Taran

1

1

5

Ajnala

1

1

2

Patti

1

1

2

 

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