Official and Non-official Visitors

 

            The agency of official and non-official visitors is beneficial to the jail administration to the extent that practical and easy-of-implementation suggestions are preferred for incorporation in the jail programme. Reformative and benevolent measures are given due consideration so as to achieve the desideratum of a reformed prisoner at the time of release. Humane treatment by the institutional staff in co-operation with official and non-official visitor goes a long way in achieving the desired results of a normal prisoner during his stay in the jail. The visits by the official and non-official visitors contribute to a great degree to the achievement of the object in view and, to that extent, their visits are beneficial to the jail administration.

 

            Sub-Jail, Patti:- The Judicial Lock-up at Patti was converted into a sub-jail in 1958. Its strength of the staff on April 1, 1968 comprised 1 Assistant Superintendent, 1 Medical Officer, 12 Head Warder and 15 Warders. The total admissions to the sub-jail during the period 1964 to 1968 were 4891. The average daily population of the sub-jail was 45.12 and the maximum population on July 2, 1968 was 104. The total number of convicted prisoners, released on different grounds during the period 1964 to 1968, was 990.

 

            There is a radio-set in this sub-jail provided for the recreation of the prisoners.  Recreational and educational programmes are relayed to the inmates through a loud-speaker fitted in the barracks. There is, however, neither any paid teacher at this jail nor any industry is carried on here. A Medical Officer attached to the jail for providing the prisoners with medical facilities.

 

            District Crime-Prevention Society, Amritsar:- It has done commendable work at the Central Jail, Amritsar. The funds of the society are limited and mainly consist of voluntary cash donation made at the time of interviews. despite this handicap, the society does useful work in aiding and financing a primary school run on the jail premises for educating the children of the jail staff. Moreover, it also runs a sewing-centre for teaching various crafts to the female students of the area. It organizes various functions inside the jail on national occasions, so that the inmates of the jail may participate in the cultural activities. The society also does some useful work in really deserving cases in the post-release period of the prisoners released from the jail.

 

            The Deputy Commissioner, who is the ex-officio Chairman of the District Crime-Prevention Society, evinces a great deal of personal interest in its activities.

 

            District Probation Officer, Amritsar:- The Probation of Offenders Act, 1958, was enforced in Amritsar District on June 1, 1967, and the District Probation Officer assumed the charge on June 22, 1967. The District ProbationOfficer is under the control of the Chief Probation Officer, Chandigarh, who supervises and directs the probation work in  the entire State, under the overall administrative control and guidance of the Inspector-General of Prisons, Punjab, Chandigarh.

 

            Under the Probation of Offenders Act, 1958, a Central enactment, any offender, who is held guilty of an offence, not punishable with death or imprisonment for life, can be released on probation of good conduct with or without supervision of the Probation Officer up to a maximum period of three years. in case of an offender below the age of 21 years, the courts have been restricted not to pass any sentence of imprisonment unless such an offender is considered undesirable for release on probation. It has been further laid down in the said Act that for the purpose of satisfying itself whether it would not be desirable to release on probation an offender under 21 years of age, the court shall call for a report from the concerned Probation Officer and consider it before the award of the sentence.

 

            The District Probation Officer is to inquire into the circumstances, home surroundings, character and general antecedents of a person accused of an offence, in accordance with the direction of a judicial court, with a view to assisting the court in determining the most suitable method of dealing with the accused, and is also to submit the social investigation report of the offender. The District Probation Officer  is supposed to perform multifarious duties and has to act as a friend, philosopher and guide in case of all offenders under his supervision. He has to render all necessary assistance to the probationer and explain to him how he should conduct himself in society. The probationer has to report to the Probation Officer, periodically, as per rules, and, in turn, the Probation Officer has to visit the probationer periodically in his home surroundings and occupational environment in order to watch the progress made by him.

 

(d) Organization of Civil and Criminal Courts

 

            Before the separation of the executive from the judiciary, the District Magistrate, in his capacity as head of the district criminal administration, was overall in charge of the magistrates and the police. Immediately under him, there was also an Additional District Magistrate who normally exercised powers under section 30 of the Criminal Procedure Code. Besides, there was one or more Magistrates Ist Class who disposed of the entire criminal work.

 

            For the disposal of the civil work, there was a separate Senior Subordinae Judge and a number of Subordinate Judges who were under the administrative control of the District and Sessions Judge.

 

            Since the separation of the executive from the judiciary in the State from October 2, 1964, the administrative of both civil and criminal justice in the district has been controlled by the District and Sessions Judge, Amritsar, as described below:

 

            Civil Justice:- On the civil side, the District and Sessions Judge, Amritsar, is assisted by the Additional District Judge, Amritsar, Senior Subordinate Judge, Amritsar, and five Subordinate Judges-three for Amritsar, one for Tarn Taran and Patti and one for Ajnala and Amritsar. Out of the five Subordinate Judges, four are Ist Class and one 3rd class. A small cause court is also provided for the Amritsar city, of which the present staff consists of one Subordinate Judge. There is no Honorary Subordinate Judge at present in the district.

            The civil courts try all types of cases of civil nature up to the powers with which the Senior Subordinate Judge and each of the Subordinate Judges have been invested. The Senior Subordinate Judge and the Subordinate Judges are also invested with magisterial powers and they are allotted some criminal work as well.

 

Additional District Judge, Amritsar

 

            On the civil side, the Additional District and Sessions Judge is known as the Additional District Judge. He hears appeals against the judgements and decrees of Sub-Judges of all classes up to Rs. 10,000 and hears cases under the Land Acquisition Act, 1894, and Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 (Act 25 of 1955). He is also the Chairman of the Special Tribunal which is invested with the powers to try cases under the Defence of India Rules, 1962.

 

Senior Subordinate Judge, Amritsar

 

            The Senior Subordinate Judge exercise civil appellate powers and enjoys exclusive jurisdiction under the Land Acquisition Act, 1894. The control of Process-serving Agency, which consists of a Cuivl Nazir, 8 Naib Nazirs, 8 Bailiffs and 71 Process Server, is vested in the Senior Subordinate Judge.

 

            The nature of civil suits generally is regarding money suits, declaratory suits, suits under the torts, suits under the Contract Act, etc.

 

Sub-Judge Ist Class

 

            All the Sub-Judges are subordinate judges exercising jurisdiction to try suits of any value. The are Rent Controllers and also try cases under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955.

 

            The statement below shows the number of cases tried by civil courts in the district during the period 1964 to 1968:

 

Number and Nature of cases tried by Civil Courts in the Amritsar District, 1964-68

 

Year

Number of suits instituted

1964

3356

1965

3509

1966

3081

1967

3379

1968

3821

 

            Criminal Justice:- On the criminal side, the District and Sessions Judge, Amritsar, is assisted by the Additional Sessions Judge, Amritsar, the Chief Judicial Magistrates, Amritsar, and 6 Judicial Magistrates-3 posted at Amritsar and one each posted at Tarn Taran, Patti and Ajnala subdivisional headquarters.

 

            With the separation of the executive from the judiciary, the powers of the District Magistrate, on the criminal side, have been vested in the Chief Judicial Magistrate, under the control of the District and Sessions Judge. The Chief Judicial Magistrate supervises the criminal judicial administration of the district. He allots the police-stations to the Judicial Magistrates with the approval of the District and Sessions Judge.

 

            The Chief Judicial Magistrate and Judicial Magistrates deal with all types of cases relating to the crime, except security cases. All Judicial Magistrates try cases under the Indian Penal Code, Punjab Excise Act, 1914, Essential Commodities Act, 1955, and other special Acts, relating to their police-stations. The Chief Judicial Magistrates is vested with the powers to try summary cases. All criminals apprehended jurisdiction the criminals may have been apprehended or in whose jurisdiction the crime may have been committed.

 

            After investigation, the challans are put in by the police in the corts of Judicial Magistrates who also act as Ilaqa Magistrates and watch the investigation of the criminal cases. A case generally takes two months for a trial, but cases of inter-district or inter-State nature may extend even upto 6 months or so. The Judicial Magistrates have also been vested with the powers of Sub-Judges with varying jurisdiction.

 

     With the separation of the executive from the judiciary, cases of security for keeping peace and security for good behaviour under the Criminal Procedure Code are tried by the following courts:

 

Subdivisional Magistrate, Amritsar –         cases relating to the Amritsar Tahsil

 

Subdivisional Magistrate, Ajnala –            cases relating to the Ajnala Tahsil

 

Subdivisional Magistrate, Patti –               cases relating to the Patti Tahsil

 

Subdivisional Magistrate, Tarn Taran –      cases relating to the Tarn Taran Tahsil

 

     The Subdivisional Magistrate are also called upon to perform executive functions in addition to the trial of cases of the above types.

 

     Petty criminal judicial cases relating to minor thefts, trespass, encroachment on public property, public nuisance, damages to property of the value not exceeding to Rs. 250, etc., are entrusted to gram panchayats under the Punjab Gram Panchayat Act, 1952. Besides, the panchayats have also been empowered to try judicial cases under various sections of the Indian Penal Code, e.g. in matters concerning the issue of summons, the production of documents, the oath and affirmation by a public servant, the promulgation of orders, etc.

 

     On the civil and revenue judicial side, the panchayats can try suits for the recovery of moveable property or the value of such property, suits for the money or goods due on contracts or price thereof, suits for compensation for wrongfully taking or damaging moveable property, and suits mentioned in clauses j, k, l and n of sub-section (3) of section 77 of the Punjab Tenancy Act, 1887. The pecuniary limits of panchayats with ordinary powers is Rs. 100 in crinal cases, Rs. 200 in civil cases and Rs. 100 in revenue cases, whereas this limit is up to Rs. 200 toRs. 500 and Rs. 200 respectively for panchayats with enhanced powers. The provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, the Code of Civil Procedure and Indian Evidence Act do not apply to the proceedings before a panchayat, except to the extent mentioned in the Punjab Gram Panchayat Act, 1952.

 

     Petty cases of criminal nature are entrusted to a gram panchayat under the Punjab Gram Panchayat Act, 1952. The Panchayats being elected bodies generally do not consist of person having adequate knowledge of law, and usual formalities of procedure are generally not observed in the trial of cases by the panchayats. Revisions against the decisions of the panchayats are heard by the judicial Magistrate.

 

     The judicial work done by the panchayats during the period 1963-34 to 1967-68 is given in the following statement:

 

 

 

Judicial work done by the Panchayats in the Amritsar District during 1963-64 to 1967-68

 

 

1963-64

1964-65

1965-66

1966-67

1967-68

Revenue Cases

1. Cases pending at the beginning of the year

795

922

829

665

624

2. Cases instituted

995

1174

892

638

547

3. Cases received by transfer

45

34

27

32

13

4. Cases transferred from panchayats and cases returned for presentation to courts and panchayats

32

38

27

12

20

5. Cases decided

881

1263

1056

699

678

(a) Cases dismissed

176

370

265

195

210

(b) Cases compounded

449

628

498

370

319

(c) Cases decreed

256

265

293

134

149

6. Cases pending at the end of the year

922

829

665

624

486

Criminal Cases

1. Cases pending at the beginning of the year

488

356

431

441

300

2. Cases instituted

752

1029

599

440

315

3. Cases received by transfer

55

57

45

27

27

4. Cases transferred from panchayats for prosecution to courts and panchayats

34

52

31

9

26

5. Cases decided

905

1390

603

599

410

(a) Cases dismissed

261

229

208

227

139

(b) Cases compounded

517

605

324

299

213

(c) Cases decreed

127

125

71

73

58

6. Cases pending at the end of the year

356

431

441

300

206

 

 

 

The statistics regarding the different types of cases tried by the criminal court’s during the period 1965 to 1968, are given below:

 

Year

Regular Cases

Security Cases

1965

25983

5068

1966

25398

4259

1967

30371

6087

1968

15530

3311

(Source:Chief Judicial Magistrate, Amritsar)   

 

(e) Bar Associations

 

            Bar associations have been formed in various districts of the State in order to encourage and promote the study of scientific law, to promote and maintain a higher standard of Professional conduct, and to promote the interests of the lawyers. They also help the courts to administer justice and to promote a sense of respect for law and order in the public mind.

 

            The Amritsar Bar Association is one of the biggest and oldest Bar Association in the State. It is said to have been established before 1900. It Claims to have on its rolls a number of eminent lawyer. Its strength in 1968 was 241. The bar association, Tran Taran, is also an old one. It is stated to have been formed in 1900 or thereabout. Its strength in 1968 was 21. The Bar Association, Patti, was formed after the independence. Its strength in 1968 was 20. The Bar Association, Ajnala, had only 3 members in 1968. These Bar Associations are rendering a useful service to the cause of the legal profession. They endeavour to maintain the dignity of the profession, besides promoting the best possible relations between the Bench and the Bar.


CHAPTER XIII

 

Other Departments

(a)

Public Works Department

(b)

Public Relation Department

©

Co-operative Department

(d)

Food and Supplies Department

(e)

Finance Department

(f)

Planning Department

(g)

Language Department

 

The departments, which have not been mentioned elsewhere in the gazetteer, have been dealt with in this chapter in regard to the scope of their activities, jurisdiction and the staff posted in the district. Their account will also explain the general administrative set-up in the district.

 

(a) Public Works Department

 

            The activities of the Public Works Department may be mainly divided into drainage, Public health, construction of building and roads, and irrigation. The jurisdiction of the circles/divisions of the department are not necessarily confined to a district. However, the circles/ divisions, having the Amritsar district within their jurisdiction, are discussed here.

 

(i) Superintending Engineer, P.W.D., Amritsar Drainage, Circle, Amritsar:-

He has four divisions under him,viz. the Amritsar Drainage Division, Amritsar; the Diversion Division, Amritsar; the Mechanical Drainage division, Amritsar; and the Jullandur Drainage Division, Jullandur. Besides the Amritsar District, the jurisdiction of this circle extends to the Gurdaspur, Kapurthala, Hoshiarpur and Jullandur districts.

 

            The superintending Engineer is assisted by a Superintendent, a Head Clerk, a Circle Head Draftsman, 5 Draftsmen and other technical, ministerial and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

Executive Engineer, P.W.D., Amritsar Drainage Division, Amritsar:-  Started in January,1957, the division is under the charge of an Executive engineer, who is assisted by the five Subdivisional Officers, a Head Draftsman, a Draftsman, 31 Sectional Officers, Artificers, Ziladars, a Head Clerk, an Accountant and other miscellaneous ministerial Class III  and allied Class IV staff.

 

This division is entrusted with the construction of drainage and flood- control works in the district. Drain, about 500 Kilometers in length, have been constructed and are being maintained. The flood-control works, along the River Ravi, below Dera Baba Nanak, are also under the control of this division. A part of the Amritsar District is within the juris diction of this division, whereas  the rest is within that of the Executive Engineer, Diversion division, Amritsar.

 

The construction of village roads, bridges and link roads has been taken up for facilitating the movement of traffic. Link drains connecting low depression are also to be taken up by the division to remove the stagnant water and to improve the land for cultivation.

 

Executive Engineer, P.W.D., Diversion, Amritsar:- Started on March 1, 1966, the division is entrusted with the work connected with drainage, flood protection and flood control, and bridges on the drains and on the rivers Ravi and Beas.

 

The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 Subdivisional Officers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Accountant, 1 Head Draftsman, 2 Draftsmen,3 Tracers, and other ministerial/ technical Class III and allied and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

(ii) Executive Engineer, P.W.D.. Amritsar Public Health Division, Amritsar:- Opened  in 1944, the division is entrusted with the work of providing public-health amenities to Government Institutions. In addition to this work, the construction of sewer and the laying of water –supply pipelines, on behalf of the municipal committees, is also an important function of the division.

 

The Executive Engineer is under the superintending  Engineer, Public- Health Circle (North), Jullundur city. The strength of the division comprises 2 Subdivisional Officers, 1 Head Draftsman, 9 Sectional Officers, 1 Apprentice Draftsman, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Accountant, besides other miscellaneous Class IV Staff.

 

(iii) Superintending Engineer, P.W.D. (Buildings and Roads0, Amritsar :- Opened in 1956, this office has four divisions under it, viz. the Executive Engineer, Provincial Division, Amritsar; the Executive Engineer, construction Division No. I,Amritsar; the Executive Engineer, Constriction Division No.II, Amritsar; and the Executive Engineer, Bridges investigation Division, Amritsar.

 

The Superintending Engineer is under the administrative control of the Chief Engineer, P.W.D. (Building and Roads), Punjab, Patiala. He is assisted by 1 Superintendent, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Circle Head Draftsman, 3 Assistant Draftsmen, 2 Tracer, besides other ministerial/ technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff for exercising administrative control over the above mentioned divisions.

 

Executive Engineer, P.W.,D., Amritsar Provincial Division, Amritsar:-

The construction division No.1,Amritsar, was opened, in 1964. The division is entrusted with the construction work of village roads under the “Crash Road Programme” the construction and maintenance of public building in patti and Tran Taran subdivisions, the construction of Chheharta labour quarters, the construction and manitenance of public building at Amritsar, viz. Medical College amd Mental Hospital, and the construction of Dharam Singh Market and Islamabad lobour quarters.

 

     The Executive Engineer, in charge of the division, is assisted by 3 Subdivisional Officers (each having four Sectional Officers and ministerial and Class IV staff under him), 1 Head Clerk, 1 Head Draftsman, 1 Accountant, besides other ministerial/technical Class and allied and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

            Executive Engineer, P.W.D., Construction Division No. II, Amritsar:- The Construction Division No. II, Amritsar, was started in February 1969. The Executive Engineer is entrusted with the construction of strategic and plan works of the Ajnala Subdivision. The construction of roads and bridges over the Sakki Nala and the Sakki Diversion has been entrusted to him. The construction of village roads under the “Crash Road Programme” in the Jandiala Guru Subdivision has also been entrusted to him.

 

            The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 Subdivisional Officers (each assisted by 4 Sectional Officer and ministerial staff), 1 Head Clerk, 1 Accountant, 1 Head Draftsman and other ministerial/technical Class III and allied miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

            Executive Engineer, P.W.D., Bridges Investigation Division Amritsar:- The Bridges Investigation Division, Amritsar, was started in 1968 and is entrusted with the construction/maintenance of bridges on roads. In addition, the division has to attend to the construction of buildings at Bhikhiwind and Khem Karan and that of some building at Amritsar.

 

            The Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 Subdivisional Officers (each assisted by 4 Sectional Officer and ministerial staff and Class IV staff), 1 Head Clerk, 1 Accountant, 1 Head Draftsman, 4 Assistant Draftsmen and other ministerial/technical Class III and allied Class IV staff.

 

            (iv) Superintending Engineer, Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Amritsar:- Started in 1859, the circle has five divisions under it, viz. The Executive Engineer, Majitha Division, Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Amritsar; the Executive Engineer, Madhopur Division, Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Amritsar; the Executive Engineer, Madhopur Division, Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Gurdaspur; the Executive Engineer, Gurdaspur Division, Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Gurdaspur; and the Land Reclamation Officer (North), Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Amritsar.

 

            The Superintending Engineer is assisted by a Superintendent, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Circle Head Draftsman, 3 Draftsmen, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and allied and miscellaneous Class IV staff. He exercises administrative control in matters concerning the running and maintenance of the Upper Bari Doab Canal and also Shah Nahar Canal, Mukerian (Hoshiarpur District).

 

            The Upper Bari Doab Canal Divisions, whose jurisdiction fall in the Amritsar District, are discussed below:

 

            Executive Engineer, Majitha Division, Upper Bari Doab Canal, Amritsar:- He is under the administrative control of the Superintending Engineer, Upper Bari Doab Circle, Amritsar. He exercises control over the running and maintenance of canals from Kunjar Fall RD. 7500 MBU to the border in between the Kasur Nala and the Kiran Nala. He has five subdivisions under his charge, viz. Amritsar, Khalra, Chheharta, Remodelling and Aliwal subdivisions. The headquartes of the last subdivision are at Aliwal in the Gurdaspur District. Each subdivision is under the charge of a Subdivisional Officer, assisted by 4 Sectinal Officers and Zildari staff, besides ministerial and Class IV staff. A Deputy Collector and seven Zaildars also assist the Executive Engineer.

 

            The main function of each subdivision is to control the areas of the respective beats in regard to the area of the Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle falling within its jurisdiction and to attend to revenue work. The Remidelling Subdivision is engaged in the remodelling of Mananwala Distributory, Basarke Distributory and the Amritsar Distributary.

 

            For running his office, the Executive Engineer is assisted by a Head Clerk, a Divisional Accountant, a Head Draftsman, 2 Draftsmen, 11 Signallers and 82 Patwris, besides other miscellaneous ministerial Class III and allied  Class IV staff.

 

            Executive Engineer, Jandiala Guru Divison, Upper Bari Doab Canal, Amritsar :- He is under the administrative control  of the Superintending Engineer, Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Amritsar. There are three subdivisions under his charge, viz. Jandiala Guru, Rayya and Tarn Taran. A Deputy Collector, assisted by 8 Ziladars, is also attached to the division. The Deputy Collector attends to revenue work. The Subdivisional Officer, Jandiala Guru Subdivision, is assisted by 2 Zildars and 4 Sectional Officers; and the Subdivisional Officers, Rayya and Tarn Taran Subdivisions, each by 3 Ziladars and 5 Sectional Officers, besides other ministerial and Class IV staff.

 

            In addition to the above, the Executive Engineer, Jandiala Guru Division, is assisted by a Head Clerk, a Divisional Accountant, a Head Draftman, a Draftsman, 3 signallers and other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous and allied Class IV staff. He exercise control over the running jkand mainttenance of canals in the Amritsar District from K.B.L. RD. 1000 to Tail (Khem Karan).

 

            Land Reclamation Officer (North), Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Amritsar :- Opened in 1961, the office of the Land Reclamation Officer (North) was previously under the Director, Land Reclamation, Irrigation and Power Research Institute, Amritsar. From Ist september, 1967, it has been attached    to the superintending Engineer, Upper Bari Doab Canal Circle, Amritsar. His main duties comprise the reclamation of saline and alkaline land in the Upper Bari Doab Canal Tracts.

 

            The Land Reclamation Officer is assisted by 2 Assistant Land Reclamation Officers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Head Revenue Clerk, 1 Divisional Head Draftsman, 2 Draftsman, 3 Sectional Officers, 1 Research Assistant, 1 Zaildar, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and allied and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

(b) Public Relations Department

 

 

            At the district level, the department is represented by the District Public Relation Officer, with headquarters at Amritsar. His duties inclde press coverage and organizing of public meetings/conferences/kavi darbars/ dramas/cinema-shows to propagate the activities of Government and distribution of publicity materials on various aspects of administration. He also receives tourists from within the country and from abroad and, for this additional work, a subordinate office, viz. The tourist Information Centre, was established at Amritsar in April 1962.

 

            The department maintains the Information Centre and the Tourist Information Centre at the district headquarters, and eight reading rooms in eight villages. It has also installed 697 radio-sets in the district.

 

            The District Public Relations Officer, Amritsar, is assisted by a drama party, comprising sctors and vocal and instrumental music players; a cinema-unit, comprising an operator and other miscellaneous staff; field publicity staff, manned by 3 Publicity Assistants; tourist staff, consisting of a Reception Officer, 2 Guides, etc.; and other ministerial/techanical Class III and allied miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

( c ) Co-Operative department

 

            The Co-operative department is represented at the district level by four Assistants Registrars, viz. The Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Amritsar; the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Tarn Taran; the Industrial Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Amritsar; and the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Consumers’Stores, Amritsar. They are under the administrative control of the Deputy Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Jullundur Circle, Jullundur, and under the overall control of the Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Chandigarh. The jurisdiction of the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Amritsar, extends to the Amritsar and Ajnala tahsil and that of the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Tarn Taran (office established in 1960), to the Patti and Tarn Taran tahsils. The jurisdiction of the industrial  Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Amritsar (office established in 1962), extends to the Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Bhatinda and Firozpur districts. The Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Consumers’stores, Amritsar (office established in 1966), is to ensure the equitable distribution of consumer goods at fair prices to the consumers through the consumers’stores.

 

            The functions of the the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Amritsar and Tarn Taran, are to advance loans to the farmers and others,. Loans are also advanced in the form of fertilizers, seeds and agricultural implements. The main duties of the Industrial Assistant Registrar are to organize Industrial Societies under various schemes and to co-ordinate to work of  arranging financing assistance to Industrial Co-operative Societies through the Reserve Bank and the Central Co-operative Banks.

 

(d) Food and Supplies Department

 

            The Food and Supplies Department is represented at the district level by the Food and Supplies Controller who is assisted by the district Food and Supplies Office, 3 Assitant Food and Supplies Offices, a Superintendent, a senior Auditor, a Head Analyst, an Accountant, 32 Food and Supplies Inspectors, and 25 Sub-Inspectors, besides other miscellaneous ministerial and Class IV staff.

 

            The main functions of the department are : the procurement of food grains and the distribution of sugar, rice, wheat-flour and vanaspati ghee in the urban as well as in the rural areas, through fair-prices shops and the branches of Co-operative Consumers; Stores. The Department also issues licences to the wholesale/retail dealers for kerosene, vanaspati ghee, foodgrains, rice, yarn, fire-wood, cotton, sugar, gur, khandsari, and rice-shelletrs and rice-hullers, and also brick-kilns. The department also checks the accounts of licensees.

 

            The department has built its own godowns for the storage of foodgrains.

 

(e) Finance Department

 

            The Finance Department is represented in the district by the Trasury /Officer, in charge of the District Treasury, Amritsar. He is assisted by 3 Assistant treasury Officers, in charge of the sub-Treasuries, Patti, Tarn Taran and Ajnal;a, one Assistant Superintendent, One district Treadurer, and 4 Asistant/Sub-treasurers, besides ministerial and Class IV staff.

 

            Previously, the District Treasury was under the control of the Extra Assistant Commisioner (Revenue Department), who could not devote whole-time attention, being mainly concerned with ministerial work. The treasury work was, as such, in addition to his normal duties. Under the scheme of the Re-organization of Treasuries, introduced in 1955, the treasuries were transferred to the Finance Department. Since then, the post of Treasury Officer has been held by the officers from the cadres of the Punjab Finance and Accounts Services.

 

            The duties of the Treasury Officers and Assistant Treasury Officers are to receive Government employees and retired personnel, both Central and State.they are also responsible to the Accountant-General, Punjab, for the regular submission of monthly accounts and allied returns.

 

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