Prevention of Adulteration of Foodstuffs

 

            For some decades past, the adulteration of foodstuffs has become a major problem. Even by the thirties, the position became so acute that an enactment to this effect became necessary. The Prevention of Food Adulteration Act, 1954, replaced the Act, passed in 1929. This was modified in 1964. Under the Act, samples are taken and sent to a chemical laboratory for analysis. The persons, whose samples are not found up to the mark, are challenged.

 

            It has not been possible to make an appreciable progress in the field. The main reason for this is the inadequacy of the executive staff. The meager staff is unable to make effective progress in checking adulteration owing to multifarious duties. The taking of samples of milk brought into the towns by vendors, of sweetmeats from the shops of halwais, and of miscellaneous articles from grocers shops is such a colossal job that the existing staff and the available laboratory facilities can hardly cope with it.

 

            The work done under the Act is detailed in Appendix X on page 519.

 

(e)        Private Hospitals and Nursing Homes

           

Besides Government medical services available in the district, as detailed above, a few prominent private hospitals in the district are: the lady Emerson Seth Chatarbhuj Maternity Hospital, Amritsar; the Saint Mary’s Mission Hospital, Tarn Taran, and the Atma Singh Janta Hospital, Bohroo. A brief reference to these hospitals is made below: -

 

(i)                              Lady Emerson-Seth Chatarbhuj Maternity Hospital, Amritsar – Established in 1937, it holds an important position among the private hospitals in the district. It is meant for women only. It is a charitable institution.  With free beds and paying wards, with all modern facilities in respect of operation etc. There are 50 beds in all.

 

The building of the hospital comprises an administrative block of a dispensary and an outdoor patients wing. The special facilities available in the hospital for the patients include diathermy, cauterization and antenatal treatment. Lady Health visitor and dais get the practical training at the hospital. The hospital has also sufficient accommodation for its staff.

 

The number of indoor and outdoor patients, treated during the 1959-68 is given below:

 

 

Year

Number of Indoor patients

Number of Outdoor patients

1959

13,810

33,808

1960

13,171

37,128

1961

14,016

42,273

1962

12,762

33,929

1963

11,639

36,199

1964

14,778

31,176

1965

26,176

12,376

1966

12,636

29,813

1967

11,002

27,083

1968

12,816

29,475

 

(ii)          Saint Mary’s Mission Hospital, Tarn Taran: - This maternity hospital is run by the mission trust. Its present building, comprising maternity ward, medical ward, surgical ward and outdoor patient clinic, was constructed in 1950. The Hospital has 50 beds and is manned by lady Doctor, two Sisters, two Auxiliary Nurses, one trained dai, beside a number of under trained Staff Nurses.

 

 

The number of indoor and outdoor patients attended to in the Hospital, during 1962-68 as under: -

 

 

Year

Number of Indoor patients

Number of Outdoor patients

1962

972

4061

1963

931

4652

1964

915

4473

1965

1122

4452

1966

1123

4928

1967

1252

5284

1968

1495

5955

 

(iii) Atma Singh Janta Hospital, Bohroo: - It was established in 19554 with the joint efforts of Shri Atma Singh and Captain Aishi Lal (Dr) a Bohroo on the Amritsar-Jhabal Road. The Hospital has a Doctor, a Dispenser and a trained Dai, beside some other staff. It has 12 beds. Necessary utensils are also provided for the patients on nominal charges.

 

The hospital functions with public donations. The numbers of indoor and outdoor patients, treated during 1958-68 are as under:

 

Year

Number of Indoor patients

Number of Outdoor patients

1958

101

14072

1959

156

15750

1960

121

16291

1961

148

17538

1962

156

9332

1963

235

12098

1964

234

8370

1965

195

8814

1966

211

9200

1967

170

7747

1968

220

8001

 

(iii)   Lepers Home Tarn Taran: - The Lepers home or leprosarium is one kilometer and a half from the Tarn Taran town. The importance of Tarn Taran for the cure of lapis is associated with the Fifth Guru, Arjan dev. The tank at tarn Taran was constructed through the efforts of Guru in 1590 and is popularly believed to cure leprosy. The town has throughout been a resort of the lepers who flocked to this place in large numbers, and formed in the town a colony called “ Mohalla Zazamian”.

 

The present asylum, situated outside the town, was established in 1858. It was maintained with Municipal funds and with the cost received from the respective districts to which the lepers belonged. In 1903, the maintenance and the control of the asylum were passed out to the Mission of Lepers, London. It is now called Leprosy Hospital and Home, Tarn Taran. It has 230 beds. At present, there is one Leprosy Specialist and 4 Nurses, besides some other allied staff. The asylum remained under the charge of Rev, Canon Dr. A.P. Dass from 1909 to 1961. Near the asylum, a colony for recovered cases and their descendants has come into existence.

 

Martha David Home

 

             Close to the asylum is a separate home for the untainted children of the patients; and is known as the Martha David Home. It has 60 seats. Here the children are kept separate from their parents. They are provided with necessary facilities fort heir education. The mission maintains both the Asylum and the home.

 

(iv)  Central Khalsa Hospital, Tarn Taran: - Started in 1915, the hospital is run by the Chief Khalsa Diwan. It is situated outside the Tarn Taran town on the Jandiaal-Tarn Taran Road. A Doctor, and two Disensers, besides other miscellaneous and allied staff, mans it. It is a 30- bed hospital. X-Ray facility is also available. About 1000 indoor patients and 15000 outdoor patients are treated every year.

 

The Chief Khalsa Diwan also runs a Homeopathic Dispensary at Amritsar near the rego Bridge. A Doctor and two Dispensers man it. A good number of patients are treated here also.

 

(f)        Medical and Public Health Educational Institutions

 

            The following medical and public health educational institutions functions in the District

 

Medical College, Amritsar: - The college was originally named the Medical School, Lahore, when it was opened in Lahore in 1864. In 1920, it was transferred to Amritsar. This school awarded the M.P.L diploma up to 1918, when the Punjab State Medical Faculty was constituted and the diploma was renamed L.S.M.F.

 

            In 1938, a new diploma was introduced and was called the L.M.S. The minimum standard for admission was raised to F.Sc. (Medical). This has now been prescribed as a pre-medical course. The duration of the medical course has been raised to five years and the syllabus and courses of study have been brought into line with those for the M.B. S. degree. In 1943, the status of the school was raised to that of a college.

 

            The college is housed in a nice building situated between the Majitha Road and the Circular Road. The Building was constructed in 1929 and further additions were made in 1957.

 

            The clinical training is given at the Victoria Jubilee Hospital and its ancillary units, viz. the Government Hospital for Women and the Ram lal Eye and E.N.T Hospital, the Sri Gujjar Mal Kesra devi Tuberculosis Sanatorium, the Kotu Mal Kesar Devi Infirmary and the Rai Bhadur Rattan Chand Thapar T.B. Clinic.

 

            Affiliated to the Guru Nanak Dev University, the college runs the following courses of study:

 

Sr. No.

Name of the Course

Number of Seats

1.

M.B.B.S

750

2.

Diploma in Pharmacy (Diploma Pharmacy and Dresser’s Course)

150

3.

B.Sc. (Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry)

20

4.

D.OM.S. (Diploma in Ophthalmic medicine and Surgery)

12

5.

D.M.R. (Diploma in Medical Radiology)

4

6.

D.C.P. (Diploma in Clinical Pathology)

8

7.

D.C.H. (Diploma in Child Health)

10

8.

D.G.O. (Diploma in Gynecology and Obstetrics)

6

9.

D.D.V.D. (Diploma in Dermatology and Venereal Diseases)

6

10.

D.L.O (Diploma in Laryngologist and Otology)

8

11.

D.C.D (Diploma in Chest Diseases)

10

12.

D.A. (Diploma in Anesthesiology)

8

13.

Radiographers’ Course

20

14.

Diploma in Medical Laboratory Technology

10

15.

M.D. & M.S. (Doctor of Medicine and Master of Surgery)

No limit (25 students are generally admitted)

 

 

            There are separate hostels for the accommodation of 252 men boarders. A new hostel with 100 single-seated rooms has been completed. The students in senior classes are provided with seats in the hostels. The women’s hostel provides accommodation for 80 boarders. The college has very extensive playgrounds.

 

            Punjab Government Dental College and Hospital, Amritsar.—Started in 1960, the college is located opposite the Company Gardens. Training for the B.D.S. course is given in this institution which is provided with ultra-modern equipment. The number of seats is 30. The indoor training facilities are available in the V.J. Hospital, Amritsar.

 

            Hygiene and Vaccine Institute, Amritsar.—Two courses are run by the institute, viz. the Sanitary Inspectors’ Certificate Course, and the Vaccinators’ Training Course, as per details given below :

 

(i)                  Sanitary Inspector’s Course.—It forms a year’s course from October to September. The minimum standard for admission is matriculation. About 80 students are admitted.

 

(ii)                Vaccinator’s Course.—The course runs twice a year, starting from April and October respectively and even more than twice, depending upon the departmental requirements. One month’s theoretical training and three months’ practical training are imparted. Students of both the sexes are admitted to the institute. The minimum standard for admission is matriculation.

 

Punjab Health School, Amritsar.—Run by the State Government under the administration control of the Director, Health Services, Punjab, this school was started in 1954 for training Lady Health Visitors.

 

There are two admissions a year, in April and in October. The minimum qualification for admission is matriculation. It is a two-year course. Nearly 20 students are admitted in every session. Practical training is imparted to the students in the local maternity hospitals.

 

Nurses’ Course of Training.—For the training of nurses, a three-year course has been started in the V.J. Hospital, Amritsar. The minimum qualification for admission is matriculation. Only 40 students are admitted. The students are required to stay in the hostel during the training period.

 

(g)                                        Sanitation

 

(h)                Public-Health and Sanitation in the Urban Areas.—It may be of interest to make a mention of the drainage system of the district. As a religious capital under Maharaja Ranjit Singh and his successors, Amritsar received special attention. A wall at a cost of 14 lakhs of rupees was built round the city which had alongside is a canal 120 yards wide, 9 yards deep and 5 miles (8 km.) long. After the occupation of the Punjab by the British in 149, the work of filling the canal with debris was taken up. This process lasted till 1890. The filling of the Bhabs (depressions), however, continued till 1914.

 

            There were central surface drains in Amritsar, Tarn Taran, Patti, Khem Karan, Jandiala Guru, Majitha, Govindwal, etc. This system was unsatisfactory as the pucca streets had stops in the centre and from every house a short straight surface drain joined the central surface drain. It was very difficult to move about in the streets during the night and especially when the drains were overlooded. The situation was particularly troublesome in Amritsar and Tarn Taran on account of heavy traffic.

 

            In 1902, the Municipal Committee, Amritsar, started the construction of side surface drains and the central surface drains were closed and the level of the streets was raised in the centre, with slopes on both sides, facilitating the flow of water. This was certainly an improvement over the previous system. In course of time, side surface drains were also introduced into Tarn Taran, Jandiala Guru, Patti, Majitha, etc. This became a common feature in practically all the towns after 1947.

 

            The side surface drains had their time. Of late, the underground drainage system has become popular. It was introduced into Amritsar in 1951. This system has also been completed in Majitha. Some important Government buildings in Tarn Taran lso have underground drainage. It will, however, be long before other towns in the district also introduced this system.

 

            The underground drainage system is of little avail unless there exists some satisfactory arrangement for he disposal of the underground drainage water. Presently, the Amritsar city is having both the systems, i.e. the side surface drains and the underground drainage, side by side. Before the introduction of the underground drainage system, the whole of the drainage water was brought into an open drain, called the extramural drain, which had been running around the walled city and then taken to the disposal tanks situated about a mile from the city. At present (1970), the drainage water is connected with the underground sewer in 90 per cent area of the city, and it is collected in the disposal tanks at a distance of 1½ km from the city. From there, the water is again pumped into the sewerage and distributed for irrigating the fields. Side by side, the night-soil from the areas, not covered under the underground drainage system, is removed in refuse-carts, hand-carts, trucks and tractor trailers. In streets where the refuse-carts cannot reach, batches of donkeys are engaged for the removal of refuse, etc. Trailers are stationed at different places in the city for emptying the hand-carts containing refuse and night-soil. This refuse is composted in the dumping-ground. The annual auction of the compost exceeds one lakh of rupees. The proper utilization of the drainage water doubly benefits the municipality. It lessens the incidence of diseases in the city and at the same time becomes a regular sources of income.

 

            With all the progress made in the field, the sanitary condition of the city continues to be far from satisfactory. The night-soil remains dumped in the streets at the collecting-points for the major part of the day and is a nuisance to the passer-by and the residents. It becomes the breeding-place for flies and mosquitoes. The solution of all these ills is the complete change to the underground drainage system. Although the municipalities can impose by law the introduction of this underground drainage system, yet the paucity of funds and public reluctance to adopt it on economic grounds stand in its way.

 

(ii)                Rural Sanitation and Water-supply.—In the past, there was no regular body in the villages to look after the health of the people. The cow-dung used to lie in the open. Unpaved kachacha drains in the villages also created nuisance. After 1930, F.L. Brayne, Commissioner, Rural Reconstruction, Punjab, took up the village-improvement programme. A disrict Dehat Sabha was organized from among the leading personalities of the district, with the Deputy Commissioner as its President. Competitions of good villages were held every year at the tahsil and district levels and prizes were awarded to those which stood first and second. With this incentive, a lot of masonry work of street pavement, pucca drainage, improvement of drinking water-wells, ventilators, the digging of manure pits, etc. were done in the villages. In the villages of Baba Bakala, Khalchian, Khadur Sahib and Govindwal, double-barrel wheel hand-pumps were provided free of cost by the Government on wells in the areas, where fairs were held. The District Board, Amritsar, also allotted Rs.3,000 yearly for sanitation. This practice continued up to 1942. Then, another scheme for the improvement of drinking water-wells was introduced with 1/3 of the cost as the village share and 2­­/3 as grant from the Government. The Government share was about Rs 200 per well. The progress in this field was, however, checked by the World War II.

 

            The partition of the country in 1947 worsened the position and the dilapidated evacuee houses were used for dumping the rubbish. After the introduction of the Community Development and National Extension Service, the concept of rural reconstruction was revived. Streets were paved, covered wells were sunk and manure pits were dug. Since the programme did not entail the element of enforcement, development only took place in the areas where people’s participation was forthcoming. The introduction of the Pancahyati Raj was another impetus. The streets in big villages have been made pucca and hand-pumps have been installed. The pavement of streets and the installation of hand-pumps by themselves are no guarantee of cleanliness. The greatest hurdle in this field is the absence of any regular conservancy staff. Unless the panchayats employ conservancy staff on regular basis on the analogy of the municipalities, the desired standard of sanitation cannot be maintained.

 

            Rural Water-Supply.—There is not shortage of drinking-water in the district. The water-level is quite shallow. In the villages, the wells sand sunk in abundance and a fairly large number of hand-pumps have also been installed.


APPENDIX I

 

(Vide page 484)

 

Birth-Rate, Death-Rate and Infantile Mortality-Rate in the Amritsar District, 1947—1968

 


Year (Calendar year)        Birth-rate per            Death-rate per                Infantile

                                         Thousand                 thousand                       mortality-rate

                                         Population               population                    under 1 year

                                                                                                             of age against

                                                                                                              per thousand

                                                                                                              live births

 


1947                                                31.00                        19.90                        184.00

1948                                  ..            32.59                        17.51                        130.00

1949                                  ..            16.29                        13.45                        157.00

1950                                  ..            26.23                        16.77                        189.03

1951                                  ..            35.84                        15.85                        121.42

1952                                  ..            39.93                        15.08                        115.73

1953                                  ..            39.56                        16.76                        129.81

1954                                  ..            39.94                        13.37                        120.84

1955                                  ..            40.85                        12.68                        115.45

1956                                  ..            40.85                        12.94                        124.83

1957                                  ..            34.16                        11.95                        105.09

1958                                  ..            34.12                        11.54                        104.92

1959                                  ..            33.21                        10.08                          95.08

1960                                  ..            33.89                        11.13                        104.76

1961                                  ..            37.98                        11.67                          97.42

1962                                  ..            35.86                        11.63                          87.49

1963                                  ..            32.23                          9.67                          88.45

1964                                  ..            32.54                        11.01                          92.49

1965                                  ..            30.62                          8.83                          69.21

1966                                  ..            29.02                          8.43                          69.21

1967                                  ..            28.45                          8.07                          72.04

1968                                  ..            28.80                          7.58                          64.38

 

            (Source : Chief Medical Officer, Amritsar)

APPENDIX II

 

(Vide page 485)

 

Death Registered According to Causes in the Amritsar District, 1951—1968

 

Year

(Calendar year)

 

Cholera

Small-pox

Plague

Fever

Dysen-tery and
diarrhoea

Respi- ratory disease

All other causes

Total

1951

..

-

2

-

13,153

559

3,715

4,270

21,699

1952

..

1

39

-

11,811

442

4,256

4,693

21,242

1953

..

-

75

-

14,407

453

3,668

5,222

24,120

1954

..

-

15

-

10,407

489

3,830

5,044

19,785

1955

..

-

9

-

9,458

423

3,620

5,818

19,328

1956

..

-

2

-

11,160

175

3,446

5,553

20,336

1957

..

-

2

-

10,250

462

3,412

4,965

19,091

1958

..

-

4

-

9,427

559

3,618

5,164

18,772

1959

..

-

3

-

8,499

333

3,279

4,753

16,867

1960

..

-

6

-

9,025

682

3,150

6,241

19,104

1961

..

-

28

-

6,737

738

3,140

7,412

18,056

1962

..

-

16

-

6,611

865

2,609

8,035

18,136

1963

..

-

31

-

6,781

562

1,776

6,122

15,270

1964

..

-

3

-

6,113

540

2,606

8,312

17,574

1965

..

-

2

-

5,806

651

1,952

5,852

14,263

1966

..

-

1

-

7,142

743

1,553

4,368

13,797

1967

..

-

9

-

6,672

804

1,580

4,196

13,378

1968

..

-

1

-

6,426

614

1,528

4,139

12,707

 

            (Statistical Abstract of District Amritsar, 1967, pp. 206-07;
Health Statistics, District Amritsar, 1969, p. 30; and Director, Health and Family Welfare, Chandigarh)

 

             APPENDIX III

 

(Vide page 488)

 

Incidence of Smallpox and the Preventive Measure Taken Against it in the
Amritsar District, 1947—1968

 


Year                                 Number of        Number of            Primary          Revaccination

(Calendar year)                  cases                   deaths                vaccination      

 


1947                   ..                  1,000                    348                40,589                2,17,576

1948                   ..                     722                    272                38,035                2,39,750

1949                   ..                       24                      12                49,773                   84,341

1950                   ..                     126                      16                42,876                   69,959

1951                   ..                       24                        2                52,921                   75,526

1952                   ..                     217                      39                57,878                2,48,760

1953                   ..                     350                      83                57,912                2,82,780

1954                   ..                       67                      15                55,293                1,06,703

1955                   ..                       42                        9                51,705                1,27,653

1956                   ..                       12                        2                66,115                1,60,338

1957                   ..                       18                        2                60,669                1,65,567

1958                   ..                       18                        4                62,158                2,93,682

1959                   ..                       26                        3                62,190                2,35,512

1960                   ..                       35                        6                57,962                1,74,443

1961                   ..                     109                      28                58,259                2,50,034     

1962                   ..                     165                      16                60,691                4,43,475

1963                   ..                     179                      31                82,259                9,27,625

1964                   ..                         6                        3                48,834                2,98,768

1965                   ..                       14                        2                62,199                1,33,529

1966                   ..                       40                        1                60,776                1,19,623

1967                   ..                     206                        9                75,217                4,68,337

1968                   ..                         3                        1                74,112                3,34,260

 

            (Statistical Abstract of District Amritsar, 1967, pp. 206-07;
Health Statistics, District Amritsar, 1969, pp. 30, 35; and the Chief Medical Officer, Amritsar)


APPENDIX IV

(vide page 490)

 

List of Officers/Officials Delegated with Food Powers in the Amritsar District

 

1.                  Chief Medical Officer, Amritsar

2.                  Deputy Chief Medical Officer (Health), Amritsar

3.                  Deputy Chief Medical Officer (Medical), Amritsar

4.                  Government Food Inspector, Amritsar

5.                  Senior Medical Officer, Civil Hospital, Ajnala

6.                  Medical Officer, Civil Hospital, Tarn Taran

7.                  Medical Officer, Civil Dispensary, Patti

8.                  Medical Officer, Primary Health Unit, Ramdas

9.                  Medical Officer, Primary Health Unit, Sirhali Kalan

10.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Unit, Kairon

11.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Lopoke

12.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Gharyala

13.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Fatehabad

14.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Sur Singh

15.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Rajoke

16.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Jhabal

17.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Naushehra Pannuan

18.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Mianwind

19.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Baba Bakala

20.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre,Tarsikka

21.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre,Thiriewal

22.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Verka

23.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Kasel

24.              Medical Officer, Primary Health Centre, Mananwala

25.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Khem Karan

26.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Sabhra

27.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Algon

28.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Mohleke

29.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Sarangdev

30.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Bhindi Aulakh

31.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Vachhoa

32.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Jasraur

33.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Jallalabad

34.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Butala

35.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Janian

36.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Chawinda Devi

37.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Sohal Thathi

38.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Asal Uttar

39.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Mari Mehga

40.              Medical Officer, Rural Dispensary, Raja Sans


APPENDIX V

(Vide page 490)

 

Primary Health Centres, Dispensaries, Hospitals, etc. in the Amritsar District, as on 31st December, 1968

 

Serial
No.

Name of the institution and location

Tahsil

Rural/
Urban

Type of
Management

No of

Male

 Beds

Female

 

Medical
Officers

Staff

Dis-
pensers

 

Dais

 

Nurses

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

 

 

HEALTH CENTRES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.

Primary Health Centre, Ramdas

Anjala

Urban

State/Public

4

4

1

2

-

1

 

2.

Primary Health Centre, Lopike

Do

Rural

Do

5

5

1

2

-

-

 

3.

Primary Health Centre, Baba Bakala

Amritsar

Do

Do

8

8

1

3

-

-

4.

Primary Health Centre, Tarsikka

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

2

-

-

 

5.

Primary Health Centre, Thiriewal

Do

Do

Do

-

-

1

1

-

-

 

6.

Primary Health Centre, Verka

Do

Do

Do

-

-

1

-

-

-

 

7.

Primary Health Centre, Mananwala Kalan

Do

Do

Do

-

-

1

1

-

-

 

8.

Railway Health Centre, Amritsar

Do

Urban

State Special

-

-

2

2

-

-

 

9.

Primary Health Centre, Ghartaka

Patti

Rural

State Public

4

2

1

2

-

-

 

10.

Primary Health Centre, Fatehabad

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

11.

Primary Health Centre, Sur Singh

Do

Do

Do

6

4

1

2

-

-

 

12.

Primary Health Centre, Rajoke

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

2

-

-

 

13.

Primary Health Centre, Kairon

Do

Do

Do

8

8

2

3

-

1

 

14.

Primary Health Centre, Jhabal

Tarn Taran

Do

Do

8

4

1

2

-

-

 

15.

Primary Health Centre, Naushehra Pannuan

Do

Do

Do

4

4

1

1

-

-

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

 

16

Primary Health Centre, Mianwind

Do

Do

Do

5

5

1

2

-

-

 

17.

Primary Health Centre, Sirhali Kalan

Do

Do

Do

4

1

1

2

-

-

 

 

DISPENSARIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18.

Provincialized Dispensary, Mohleke

Anjala

Do

Do

2

2

-

1

-

-

 

19.

Provincialized Dispensary, Sarangdev

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

20.

Provincialized Dispensary, Bhindi Aulakh

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

21.

Provincialized Dispensary, Vachhoa

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

22.

Provincialized Dispensary, Jasraur

Do

Do

Do

2

2

-

1

-

-

 

23.

Rural Dispensary, Raja Sansi

Do

Do

Do

24

12

1

2

-

-

 

24.

District Board Dispensary, Jagdev Kalan

Do

Do

Zila Parishad

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

25.

Provincialized Dispensary, Butala

Amritsar

Do

State Public

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

26.

Provincialized Dispensary, Janian

Do

Do

Do

4

2

1

1

-

-

 

27.

Provincialized Dispensary, Chawinda Devi

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

28.

District Board Dispensary, Sathiala

Do

Do

Zila Parishad

-

3

1

1

-

-

 

29.

Civil Dispensary, Mahta

Do

Do

Do

4

4

1

-

-

-

 

30.

Subsidized Dispensary, Beas

Do

Do

Subsidized

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

31.

Civil Dispensary, Majitha

Do

Urban

Zila Parishad

2

2

-

1

-

-

 

32.

Workshop Dispensary, Amritsar

Amritsar

Urban

State Special

-

-

1

2

-

-

 

33.

P.A.P. (B.S.F.) Dispensary, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

-

-

1

1

-

-

 

34.

New City Dispensary, Amritsar

Do

Do

Municipal

-

-

1

2

1

-

 

35.

Dhab Tali Bhawan Dispensary, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

-

-

1

2

1

-

 

36.

Old City Dispensary, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

-

-

1

2

1

-

 

37.

Marwari Zanana Dispensary, Amritsar

Do

Do

Private Non-aided

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

38.

Gandhi Sewa Sadan Homeopathic
Dispensary, Putlighar, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

15

15

-

-

-

-

 

39.

Sewa Samiti Free Dispensary, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

6

-

3

10

-

5

 

40.

Dayanand Dispensary, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

-

-

2

3

2

-

 

41.

Free Dispensary Guru Ram Das, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

10

-

4

1

-

-

 

42.

School Health Clinic, Amritsar

Do

Do

State Public

-

-

2

3

-

-

 

43.

R.B. Rattan Chand Anti-T.B. Clinic, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

-

-

2

-

-

1

 

44.

Provincialized Dispensary, Khem Karan

Patti

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

45.

Provincialized Dispensary, Sabhra

Do

Rural

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

46.

Provincialized Dispensary, Algon

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

47.

Women’s Dispensary, Mari Megha

Do

Do

Do

-

4

-

1

-

-

 

48.

Rural Dispensary, Asal Uttar

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

49.

Rural Dispensary, Chaburput

Do

Do

Do

-

-

1

1

-

-

 

50.

Civil Dispensary, Khalra

Do

Do

Zila Parishad

2

1

1

1

-

-

 

51

Civil Dispensary, Patti

Do

Urban

Municipal

2

3

1

1

-

-

 

52.

Maternity Home, Patti

Do

Do

Do

-

8

-

-

-

-

 

53.

Provincialized Dispensary, Kasel

Tarn Taran

Rural

State Public

6

6

1

2

-

-

 

54.

Provincialized Dispensary, Jallalabad

Do

Do

Do

2

2

1

1

-

-

 

55.

Civil Dispensary, Atari

Do

Do

Zila Parishad

6

4

2

1

-

-

 

56.

Provincialized Dispensary, Sohal Thathi

Do

Do

State Public

3

3

-

1

-

-

 

57.

Subsidized Dispensary, Dhotian

Do

Do

Subsidized

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

 

HOSPITALS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

58.

Civil Hospital, Ajnala

Ajnala

Urban

State Public

9

8

1

3

-

1

 

59.

District Jail Hospital, Amritsar

Amritsar

Do

State Special

12

-

2

2

-

-

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

 

60.

E.S.I. Hospital, Amritsar

Amritsar

Do

State Special

45

5

7

5

-

-

 

61.

Police Hospital, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

25

-

1

1

-

-

 

62.

Railway Hospital, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

12

-

4

3

-

7

 

63.

P.W. Zanana Hospial, Amritsar

Do

Do

Municipal

-

50

2

-

4

4

 

64.

Infectious Diseases Hospital, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

15

15

1

1

-

-

 

65.

V.J. Hospital, Amritsar

Do

Do

State Public

406

295

8

18

-

-

 

66.

Punjab Mental Hospital, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

492

295

9

3

-

9

 

67.

Punjab Government Dental College and Hospital, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

-

-

28

-

-

5

 

68.

T.B. and Chest Diseases Hospital, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

155

100

10

2

-

20

 

69.

Pingalwara, Firozdin Road, Amritsat

Do

Do

Private Non-aided

280

-

-

2

-

20

 

70.

Lady Emerson-Seth Chatarbhuj Maternity Hospital, Tarn Taran

Do

Do

Private Aided

-

38

2

1

2

3

 

71.

Civil Hospital, Tarn Taran

Tarn Taran

Do

StatePublic

4

4

2

3

-

-

 

72.

Central Khalsa Hospital, Tarn Taran

Do

Do

Private Aided

18

12

-

-

-

-

 

73.

St. Mary’s Mission Hospital, Tarn Taran

Do

Do

Do

-

50

-

-

-

-

 

74.

Lepers’ Home, Tarn Taran

Do

Do

Do

115

115

-

-

-

-

 

 

(Health Statistics, District Amritsar, 1969, pp. 87-89; Chief Medical Officer, Amritsar)

 


APPENDIX VI

(Vide page 490)

 

Family Planning Units/Clinics in the Amritsar District, as on 1st January, 1969

 

Serial
No.

Name of the institution and location

Tahsil

Rural/
Urban

Type of
Management

Female
Medical
Officers

Staff

Lady
Health
Visitors

 

Trained
Dais

1.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Ramdas

Anjala

Urban

Government

1

1

4

2.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Sur Singh

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

3.

Rural Family Planning Centre, Verka

Amritsar

Do

Do

1

1

4

4.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Verka

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

5.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Thiriewl

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

6.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Tarsikka

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

7.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Baba Bakala

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

8.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Mananwala

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

9.

Urban Family Planning Unit, Amritsar

Do

Urban

Do

2

-

1

10.

Urban Family Planning Unit, Medical College, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

11.

Urban Family Planning Unit, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

1

-

-

12.

Rural Family Planning Unit, Gharyala

Patti

Rural

Do

1

1

4

13.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Rajoke

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

14.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Lopoke

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

15.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Kairon

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

16.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Fatehabad

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

17.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Sirhali Kalan

Tarn Taran

Do

Do

1

1

4

18.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Mianwind

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

19.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Jhabal

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

20.

Rural Family Planning Unit,  Kasel

Do

Do

Do

1

1

4

21.

Family Planning Clinic,  Jandiala Guru

Amritsar

Urban

Local Bodies

-

-

-

22.

Family Planning Clinic, Chheharta

Do

Do

Do

-

-

-

23.

Family Planning Clinic, Sirki Bandan, Amritsar

Do

Do

Red Cross

1

-

1

24.

Family Planning Clinic, Kot Baba Dip Singh, Amritsar

Do

Do

Local Bodies

-

1

1

25.

Family Planning Clinic, Katra Sher Singh, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

1

1

1

26.

Family Planning Clinic, Katra Karam Singh, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

-

1

1

27.

Family Planning Clinic, Mehma Singh Road, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

1

1

1

28.

Family Planning Clinic, Bhagtanwala, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

1

1

1

29.

All-India Women’s Conference (Amritsar Branch),
Women’s Welare Centre, Amritsar

Do

Do

Do

1

-

-

30.

Family Planning Clinic, Patti

Patti

Do

Do

-

-

-

31.

Family Planning Clinic, Tarn Taran

Tarn Taran

Do

Do

-

-

-

 

(Health Statistics, Disrict Amritsar, 1969, p. 91; Chief Medical Officer, Amritsar)

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