APPENDIX   IV

 

a.      Work  done by the Co- operative Marketing Societies in the Bathinda District, 1977-78 to 1988-89

 

Co-operative year ending  June

No. of Co-operative societies at the end of the year

Membership

Total

Share Capital paid up (Rs in lakhs)

Loan Advanced during the year (Rs in lakhs)

Deposits (Rs in lakhs)

Societies

Individuals

1977-78

11

663

6310

6973

6.56

178.48

362.55

1978-79

11

663

6513

7176

6.28

246.57

498.70

1979-80

11

663

6517

7180

6.87

166.71

55.55

1980-81

11

663

6517

7180

6.87

163.40

517.12

1981-82

11

663

6619

7182

6.87

192.01

533.62

1982-83

11

663

6782

7445

8.08

184.21

667.78

1983-84

11

663

6782

7445

8.08

184.21

640.78

1984-85

11

663

6782

7445

8.03

163.21

905.91

1985-86

18*

663

6804

7467

7.81

180.13

27.61

1986-87

18*

663

6816

7479

9.69

226.65

33.26

1987-88

18*

663

6816

7479

9.79

150.90

36.55

1988-89

18*

663

6868

7554

8.85

154.70

1066.49

(Source  :  Deputy Registrar, Co-Operative Societies, Bathinda)

 

*7  Co-operative Marketing Societies are under liquidation.

 

 

CHAPTER   VII

COMMUNICATIONS

(a)

Old Time Trade Routes and Highways and Modes of Conveyance

(b)

Road Transport

(c)

Railways

(d)

Waterways, Ferries and Bridges

(e)

Air Transport

(f)

Travel and Tourist Facilities

(g)

Posts, Telegraphs and Telephones

 

(a)    Old-time Routes and Highways and Modes of Conveyance

 

The socio-economic development of a region mainly depends upon its means of communications—roads, railways, airlines, inland navigations, ferries and bridges, gas and oil pipeline, etc. Of all these modes of communications, roads, metalled or unmetalled, are the most universal and perhaps the oldest used by the humanity. Even in these days, no area can enjoy the fruits of progress unless it is well served by a good network of roads. Construction of roads plays a dominant role in the development of industrial and agricultural sectors of the economy,. The Grand Trunk Road, made by Sher Shah Suri, is the oldest road passing through the territory of Punjab. During the reign of East India Company, the construction of roads got attention of the British rulers.

 

            Although the area of Bathinda District is sandy to a great extent, still in its length and breadth, it is adequately served by roads as well as by railways. Before the advent of automobile vehicles and railways, the major modes of conveyance in the district were domesticated animals like bullocks, camels, horses, donkeys, etc. These animals were used both for undertaking long journeys and transportation of goods. Besides, bullocks/camel carts and tongas were used by the people to travel from one place to another. With the development of rail and road transport, the people by and by started replacing the old means of transport by the modern ones. Presently, the people even in the most remote areas have started using the advanced means of transport.

 

(b)   Road   Transport

 

            Roads play a vital role in the gigantic task of national construction. The area of the present Bathinda District comprised parts of the erstwhile princely states of Patiala, Nabha, Faridkot and some portions of the British territory, then forming part of Firozpur District. The metalled and unmetalled roads were maintained by the rulers of the then princely states. By the turn of the 20th  century, the roads maintained by  them in the area comprising present Bathinda District were Bathinda-Mandi, Hadiaya-Bhikhi and Phul Railway Station roads. Prior to the partition of the country, a pucca road connecting Bathinda with Firozpur via Kot Kapura-Faridkot traversed the district. After the Independence, the State/Central Governments paid attention towards the construction of roads. By 1950-51, there existed about 221 km of metalled / unmetalled  roads on the district. By 1960-61, the length of roads in the district increased by 680 km. During 1972, the Faridkot Tahsil of the district was attached to the newly created Faridkot District. Due to the tremendous increase in the activity of road construction, the road length in the district touched the 2783 km mark in 1988-89.

 

            The major roads passing through the district are Bathinda-Sardulgarh, Dakha-Sardulgarh, Bagha Purana-Nathana, Barnala-Jaitu, Bhawanigarh-Ko-Shamir, Dialpura-Rampura Phul, Maur-Bathinda-Dabwali, Bhikhiraitia, Moonak-Budhlada, Sardulgarh-Tohana, Nathana-Jandwala, Bathindaa-Ghuda, Jalal-Hakim Singh Wala, Talwandi Sabo-Raman, Mansa-Talwandi Sabo and Maur-Talwandi Sabo. Besides, there are also certain minor link roads which pass through the villages connecting these with major roads. The following figures give an idea of extension of roads in the district :-

 

Year

Metalled  roads (km)

Unmetalled roads (km)

Total length of roads (km)

1950-51

176

45

221*

1960-61

559

121

680*

1970-71

1176

---

1176*

1984-85

2504

46

2550

1985-86

2577

110

2687

1986-87

2717

40

2757

1987-88

2773

10

2783

1988-89

2783

---

2783

 

*These figures include road length of the then Faridkot Tahsil also.

 

            Punjab District Census Handbook No. 16 Bathinda District 1961, pp., 22 and 74 and Statistical Abstracts of Punjab, 1972 and 1985 to 1989

 

            In 1988-89, the total road length in the district was 2783 km. This road length per hundred sq km of area of the district works out to 66 km and per lakh of population  236 km. All the inhabited villages of the district are linked with roads.

 

(i)                Classification of Roads

 

The National/State highways are the main arteries of commerce within the states. The District roads and village roads carry the traffic into the interior and serve the needs of rural areas by linking them with the railways and highways.

 

            According to the Nagpur Road Plan of 1943, the roads were classified into four categories, viz. National highways, State highways, District roads and villages roads. Out of the total length of roads in the district, the length of National highways was 46 km, whereas of state highways, district major roads, other district roads and village roads was 226.02 km, 163.04 km, 194.04 km and 2153.90 km, respectively. The state highways, District major roads, other District roads and village  roads are maintained by the public works department (B&R). Besides, various  Municipal Committees also maintain roads within their municipal limits (The length of such roads is given  in Chapter XIV, Local Self-Government). A detailed description of each category of roads in the Bathinda District is given below :-

 

            National Highways.__  The national highways serve as inter-state links and are of national, strategic and administrative importance. These are constructed and maintained by the State Public Works Department  out of the Central Government funds. The portion of  National highway No. 15 from village Ramana Jit  Singh to village Karamgarh Sattran traverses 46 km in the area of Bathindaa District.

 

            State Highways.__  These are main arterial roads of the state and are generally connected with the national highways. Sometimes, they connect highways of adjacent  states and also district headquarters or important cities. These are constructed and maintained by the state public works department. The state highways passing through the Bathinda district are:  State highway No. 17 Bathinda-Sardulgarh via Rori, 47.07 km of which falls in the Bathinda and Talwandi Sabo tahsils. The other sections of this highway are Rori to Sardulgarh Road, of which 4.40 km falls in Mansa Tahsil, Bhawanigarh, Bhikhi, Sunam, Kot Shamir Road, of which 62.60 km area falls in the Mansa Tahsil; Bagha Purana, Nathana, Bhucho Road, of which 39.85 km area falls in the Rampura Phul Tahsil, Dakha, Raikot, Barnala, Mansa, Sardulgarh, Sirsa Road, of which 72.10 km area falls in the Mansa Tahsil.

 

            District Major Roads.__  These are defined as roads traversing each district, serving areas of production and markets and connecting these with each or with highways and stations. These roads are also maintained by the state pubic works department. On 31 March 1989, the total length of these roads in the distrct was 163.04 km.

 

            Other District Roads.__  These serve as important arteries of communications among the different parts of the district. Their total length in the district, as on 31 March 1989, was 194.04 km.

 

            The other district roads also include the roads formerly falling under head ‘district minor roads’, since the use of the latter term has been discontinued.

 

            Village Approach Roads.__  These roads connect villages or groups of villages with one another and to the nearest district roads. These are constructed by the joint efforts of the villagers. Previously, some of these roads were maintained by the Zila Parishad, Bathinda, but now these have been transferred to the state public works department. The total length of these roads in the district, as on 31 March 1989, was 2153.90 km.

 

(ii)               Vehicles and Conveyances

 

Though, the use of camel cart in the urban areas as a means of conveyance has largely been replaced by motor vehicles, yet in the countryside, the camel cart is still in vogue. The camel cart is being fitted with pneumatic rubber tyres in place of traditional wooden wheels. In the rural areas, the horse-drawn vehicles used for the carriage of passengers has been mostly replaced by the motor bus. But in mandis, however, donkey/camel-drown vehicles still continue to ply side by side with motor vehicles for the transportation of goods. The thelas pulled by one or two men and used mostly in the cities to carry goods from one place to another, within the city premises are also being replaced by quicker mechanized modes of transportation. Tractors have now become a popular means of transport with well-to-do framers. The people have become speed minded and prefer to travel by mechanized vehicles.

 

            Automobiles,__  The automobile has become a common means of travel and transportation of goods for long distances. Its speed and reliability enable the user to cover a wide areas in the minimum of time and with the minimum of trouble.

           

            Automobiles which are plied in the district include motor-cycles, scooters, jeeps, cars, taxis, buses, trucks, tractors and auto-rickshaws. The number of different types of motor vehicles registered in the district from 1981-82 to 1988-89 given in Appendix I on page 231.

 

            Bicycles.__  The bicycle is the most popular means of conveyance for relatively short distances. Its operation is economical and it can be put to multiple uses. Moreover, its maintenance cost is also very low. It is an essential means of conveyance in cities, especially for the poor and lower middle class persons. The villagers bring vegetables, milk and other agricultural produce to the urban markets on cycles.

 

            Cycle-Rickshaws.__  It is a three-wheeled cycle pulled by a man with a sitting capacity of tow persons and used to cover short distances generally within the city area. It is a cheap, convenient and easy type of conveyance as compared to mechanically operated vehicles. Its charges are low and it has not to wait for passengers for long as only two persons make its full capacity. Moreover, it can pass through narrow and zig-zag streets also. The development of roads has increased the mobility of cycle-rickshaws from the towns to the adjoining villages and vice versa. According to the be-laws framed by the state government, persons who are physically fit and are between the age of 18 and 45 generally ply this vehicle. Under the scheme ;Rickshaw Chalak (puller) Rickshaw Malik (owner)’, loans are arranged by the state government  form commercial banks so as to enable the rickshaw pullers to purchase their own rickshaws.  Interest of  these loans is reimbursed in full by the government. Under the Punjab Cycle Rickshaw (Regulation of License) Act,1976, licences are issued to the owners only.

 

            Horse Carriages.__  Although buses and rickshaws are plying in all the towns of the district, the horse carriages are still in vogue under the changed name horse carts. The farmers and shop-keepers who cannot afford tractor-trollies have maintained horses, donkeys, and camel carts. As a means of conveyance, horse/donkey carts are very helpful in carrying passengers and carriage of goods from one part of the city to another, from town to town, from town to villages and vice versa. Tongas, and ekksa are useful and cheap means of transportation  for the villagers as well as for the local passengers in the towns. There is keen competition between the horse-drown carriages, on the one hand, and the motor-buses, tempos and cycle-rickshaws on the other. Though an old type of conveyance, the horse-drawn carriages cannot be ousted completely.

 

(iii)            Pubic and Private Transport

 

The Provincial Transport Controller headed the Transport Depatment till June 1969. He was responsible for enforcing the Motor Vehicles Act and rules framed thereunder. The commercial wing of the department also functioned under his control. In order to give equal justice to the private operators and the state owned transport, the transport department was bifurcated in June 1969, in two wings, viz. commercial wing and non-commercial wing. The former, known  as Punjab Roadways, was placed under the control of the Director, State Transport, Punjab, and the latter under the State Transport Commissioner, Punjab as heads of the Department. The Director, state transport, being the overall in charge of commercial wing, is concerned with the development and operation of state transport buses on commercial basis. The state transport commissioner is concerned with the issuing of route permits and the enforcement of the motor vehicles act and the rules framed the reunder, grant of route permits for stage carriers to both the public and private sectors and for public carriers, tempos, taxis, etc.

 

Prior to the Independence, road transport was mostly in the hands of private operators, who were interested only in large profits and seldom cared for the convenience of the passengers. With the rapid development of a network of roads and industrialization, road transport has expanded enormously. Therefore, the government have started gradual and progressive nationalization of this service. At present, there is a partial nationalisation of passenger transport service in the state and 60:40 scheme is in operation. Under this scheme, all further operations on the existing local routes, not exceeding 16 km as well as monopoly routes shall be undertaken by the Punjab Roadways.

 

State Owned Services.__  Most of the bus routes in the district are operated by the three depots of PEPSU Road Transport Corporation viz..Bathinda I,  II  &  Budhlada. The Bathinda Depot came into being on 30 March 1970.  It was bifurcated into two depots, viz. Bathinda Depot-I and Bathinda Depot-II, the later started functioning, w.e.f. 1 May 1979. The later started functioning, w.e.f. 1 May 1979. The Bathinda  I and II depot owned 93 and 96 buses, respectively as on 31 March 1989. These depots operated on 62 and 54 routes and covered 24882 scheduled kilometers daily, respectively. Another depot of the Pepsu Road Transport in the district, viz. Budhlada Depot, started functioning from 1 May 1979. It had 73 buses and operated on 51 routes and covered 19148 scheduled kilometers daily as on 31 March 1989. The details of these routes are given in Appendix II at the end of the Chapter on pages 232-239.

 

Private Bus Services.__  A number of bus routes in the district are also being operated by the private transport companies. The particulars regarding the names of the private companies and the routes operated by them are given in Appendix III, at the end of the chapter on pages 240-254.

 

Goods Transport by Road.__  It is mainly in the hands of the private companies and owners. The state government is following a liberal policy for the grant of public carrier permits. In almost all the towns of the district, unions have been formed by the owners of trucks for the public carrier of goods. The establishment of these companies have relieved the businessmen of the ardous job of transporting their goods from one place to another, not even in the state but  in the country as well. They can just book their goods on telephone as these companies have established their regular offices. For inter-state operation of the trucks for the transport of goods from one state to another, the government has entered into bilateral agreement with other states to facilitate free flow of goods throughout the country. The names of some of the important goods transport companies functioning in the district are given below :

 

1.                  Transport Corporation of India Ltd , Bathinda 

2.                  Parkash Road Line Private Ltd , Bathinda

3.                  South Eastern Roadways , Bathinda

4.                  East India Transport Agency , Bathinda

5.                  Gohati Indore Roadways , Bathinda

6.                  Great India Road Lines , Bathinda

7.                  Green Roadways (Regd) , Bathinda

8.                  Eastern Road Carriers (Regd) , Bathinda

9.                  Pepsu Goods Transport Company , Bathinda

10.              Milap Rajasthan Roadways , Bathinda

11.              Montogomery Cop-Ready Goods Transport Society Ltd, , Bathinda

12.              New Okara Transport Company , Bathinda

13.              Patiala Transport Company, Private Ltd. , Bathinda

14.              Chadha Motor Transport Company, Private Ltd , Bathinda

15.              Milap Transport Roadways , Bathinda

16.              Maheswari Golden Carriers , Bathinda

17.              Green Roadways Corporation , Bathinda

18.              Patiala Carriers (Regd) , Bathinda

19.              Delhi Punjab Goods Carriers , Bathinda

20.              Delhi Punjab Golden Carriers , Bathinda

21.              Delhi Punjab Gujarat Carriers , Bathinda

22.              Wadhawa Goldern Carriers , Bathinda

23.              Doaba Public Goods Carriers , Bathinda

 

(c)     Railways

 

            The Bathinda District lies in the Delhi Division of Northern Railway. Bathinda is the biggest railway junction on the broad-gauge line having connections with Rajpura, Firozpur, Hanumangarh, Rewari and Delhi. The railway lines starting from Bathinda junction or passing through the Bathinda District are ; Bathinda  Delhi line and stations falling on this line in the district are  Katar Singh Wala,  Kot Fateh,  Maisar Khana,  Maur,  Kotli Kalan Halt,  Sadda Singh Wala,  Mansa,  Narindrapura,  Budhlada,  Date Was Bareta  and  Kahangarh ;  Bathinda-Firozpur line has  Goniana and  Chand Bhan stations,  Phus Mandi,  Bhucho,  Laihra Khana Halt,  Lehra Muhabat,  Rampura Phul  and   Jethu Ke stations are situated on Bathinda-Dhuri-Ambala Cantonment line.  Bathinda-Hindumalkote - Sri Ganganagar line has only three stations, namely Behman Dewana,  Bulluana, Karamgarh  Sardargarh  Halt. Five stations, namely Narauna Jodhpur Romana Halt, Gursar  Sanehwala,  Sangat,  Bagwall and  Pathrala  Halt are situated on Bathinda- Suratgarh line.  Bathinda-Rewari line has six stations, namely Garhi Bhagi,  Shergarh,  Manwalakot Bakhtu Halt,  Bangi Nihal Singh Raman and Ratangarh  Kanakwal Halt falling in the district. From the above, five lines which start from Bathinda junction, are broad gauge double lines. The total route length of railways in the district is approximately 244 km. The average route length per 100  sq  km of the area works out to be 4141 km in the district.

 

            Rail-Road Competition.__  Every means of transport has its ownsphere of economic service and its limitations. The problem of competition arises only when some means of transport extend their own activities and narrow the sphere of othr means of transport. In the beginning, road traffic was not much affected by the introduction of railways in India, as at that time mechanical haulage did not exist. But the position changed after the World War I (1914-18), when mechanical road haulage became popular throughout the country. A large number of motor-buses began to ply on the roads and competed with railways for short distance passenger traffic. The Railway Board Report of 1926-27 pointed out that the Indian Railways had begun to feel the pressure of competition from motor vehicles. The main difficulty being faced by the railways vis-à-vis road vehicles was that on account of the flexible character of their service, the road vehicles were free to choose the best paying traffic.

 

            The Government of India, therefore appointed in 1933 the Mitchell-Kirkness Committee to conduct inquiry into the rail-road competition. The Committee recommended a  strict  regulation of road traffic to eliminate competition. In 1937, the Wedgewood Committee also recommended the protection of railways against unfair competition of roads by controlling, supervision, regulating and licensing of the motor vehicles. In 1939, the Motor Vehicles Act was passed for regulating motor transport. During the World War II  (1939-45) , there was practically no rail-road competition. But after the War, the fear of rail-road competition arose again. In 1950, the Government appointed the Motor Vehicles Taxation Inquiry Commission, which recommended the imposition of taxes on the vehicles. Consequently, the rail-road comptition was reduced due to the heavy taxation imposed on road vehicles. However, with the vast development  of  agriculture and industry in the country and consequent increase in traffic, the rail-road competition has become a thing of the past and the two systems of transport have become complementary rather than competitive.

 

(d)     Waterways, Ferries and Bridges

 

            Waterways and Ferries.__  There is neither any navigable river/canal nor any ferry system in the Bathinda District.

 

            Bridges.__  Bridges are constructed over the streams, canals, chos, etc. for the smooth running of road traffic.

 

(e)       Travel and Tourist Facilities

 

            There are a number of dharmshalas and serais in the district for travelers, tourists and visitors. Besides, hotels and restaurants in urban areas of the district provide lodging facilities to the visitors. Gurudwaras, in urban as well as in rural areas, provide free boarding and lodging facilities to the visitors.

 

            Rest Houses.__  These are maintained by different Government departments to accommodate their employees while on tour to the district. The employees of the Public undertakings also make use of this facility. However, when vacant, these are made available to the public as well on prescribed rent. A list of rest houses in the district is given in Appendix IV, on pages 255-258.

 

(f)        Posts, Telegraphs and   Telephones

 

            The post offices in the district are under the control of the Superintendent, Post Offices,  Bathinda Division, , Bathinda. To provide postal facilities to the public, letter boxes have been affixed at the important centers in towns which are cleared at fixed timings, once or twice a day. All the villages of the Bathinda District have been covered under daily delivery system.

 

            The Postal Index Number (PIN)* Code was introduced in the country on 15 August 1972.  It is a six digit code that identifies and locates every departmental delivery service. It provides with a built in routing, information for posta sorting and quick delivery of the post. The Pin Code of Bathinda is 151001.

 

            Om 31 March 1989, there were one Head Post Office, 31 Sub-Post Offices, and 198  Branch  Post Offices in the district. A list of these post offices is given in Appendix V on pages 259-266.

 

            Telegraphs.__  The district is well served by a number of combined post and telegraph offices. There are one TP/Morse office, 7  Morse sub-offices and 48 phonocum sub-offices, in the district. On 31 March1989, telegraph facility was available in 56 post offices in the Bathinda District, as given in Appendix VI on page 267.

 

            Telephones.__  There are 24 telephone exchanges in the district functioning at Bathinda,  Mansa,  Maur,  Budhlada,  Bareta,  Goniana,  Sangat,  Sardulgarh,  Raman,  Phul,  Phul Mandi,  Talwandi Sabo,  Nathana,  Kotha Guru Ka,  Balianwali,  Kot Fateh, Boha,  Jhunir,  Bhai Rupa,  Bhikhi, Bhagta Bhaika,  Joga and Kot Shamir. These are under the control of the Sub Divisional Engineer, Telephones, Bathinda, who works under the over all control of the Divisional Engineer, Telephones,  Bathinda Division, Bathinda. The total number of connections and extensions provided by these exchanges, on 31 March 1989 were 8100 and 298, respectively. Besides, there are 86 public call offices functioning in the district.

 

* The first digit represents the zone the second the sub-zone & the routing, the third digit pinpoints the sorting district and the last three digits indicated the specific post offices included in that sorting district.

 

            Radios and  Televisions.__  There are a Television Station and a Radio Broadcasting Station at Bathinda. The data regarding the number of television and radio ests in the distrtict is not available, as these have been totally exempted from the license fee. The description regarding the T.V. Station at Bathinda is given below :

 

            Doordarshan Service in Bathinda.__  A low power (100 watts) T V transmitter was installed in Bathinda on 12 June 1984. It had an effective range of 25 kilometres round the T V tower. This has since been replaced by a high power (10 KW) with effect from 1 April 1985, increasing thereby, the range of service to 90 kilometres. The T V transmitter is housed in the Doordarshan building situated on the main Mansa Road and has 135 meters high mast on which the TV transmitting antenna has been fixed. It operates on channel 12 and relays  Delhi Programmes via Microwave lines.

 

(g)     Organisations of Owners and Employees in the Field of Transport and Communications.

 

            To promote their service interests and well being, the following unions/ associations have been formed by the employees in the field of transport and communications in the district:-

 

 

SN

Name of the Union

1

Rickshaw Workers’ Union , Bathinda

2

Western Command M E S Civilian Drivers’ Association , Bathinda

3

Pepsu Road Transport Corporation Drivers’ Union , Bathinda

4

Auto Worker’s Union , Bathinda

5

Tonga Rehra Mazdoor Union, Bhagta Bhaika

6

Gadda Labour Union, Bareta Mandi

7

Budhlada Gadda Rehri Mazdoor Union, Bathinda

8

Rampura Phul Truck Operator’s Union , Bathinda

9

Rama Truck Operator’s Union , Bathinda

10

Rickshaw Chalk  Mazdoor Union , Bathinda

 

 

APPENDIX   I

 

b.     Number of different types of motor vehicles registered in the Bathinda District, during 1981-82 to 1988-89

 

Year

Buses

Cars

Jeeps

Taxis

Auto Rickshaws

Motorcycles/ Scooters

Trucks

Tractors

Others

1981-82

130

2313

366

25

17

8891

946

20491

99

1982-83

132

2445

377

38

19

10293

1090

22454

99

1983-84

113

2541

408

90

25

11851

1211

24113

103

1984-85

124

2658

432

96

32

13371

1304

25219

105

1985-86

146

2781

470

99

52

15248

1350

26078

108

1986-87

166

2934

528

101

96

17514

1523

27178

109

1987-88

200

3119

576

123

129

19426

1707

29165

112

1988-89

229

3374

623

124

144

22365

1929

31506

113

                                                                                                                          (Statistical Abstracts of Punjab, 1982 to 1989)

 

 

 

APPENDIX   II

Bus routes operated by the Pepsu Transport Corporation Bathinda  I,  II and Budhlada Depots, as on 31 March 1989

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

1

Pepsu Road Transport Corporation, Bathinda-1

Patiala--Chandigarh

3

70

420

Patiala—Ambala Cantonment

2

56

224

Bathinda—Patiala

5

171

1710

Patiala--Nangal

1

152

304

Jakhal—Patiala

1

91

182

Bathinda—Malout

1

53

106

Bathinda—Dabwali

11

40

880

Bathinda—Hisar

1

190

380

Patiala—Kasauli

1

140

280

Bathinda—Sirsa

1

128

256

Bathinda—Jakhal

1

132

264

Bathinda—Talwandi

6

30

360

Bathinda—Kot Shamir

6

13

156

Bathinda—Jiwan Singh Wala

6

19

228

Bathinda—Talwandi              (via Pakka)

1

57

114

Phagwara—Hoshiarpur

1

38

76

Bathinda—Kharar (via—Chandigarh)

1

256

512

Bathinda—Jassi Bagwali

6

30

360

Bathinda—Malerkotla

5

110

1600

Muktsar—Patiala

1

226

452

Talwandi—Nangal

1

346

692

Bathinda—Lambi

1

43

86

Bathinda—Sangha

3

90

540

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

 

 

Raman—Rampura

3

63

378

Muktsar—Patiala                (via Barnala)

1

232

464

Bathinda—Raman

3

42

252

Bathinda—Abohar

1

95

190

Malout—Abohar

1

32

64

Abohar—Sri Ganganagar

1

44

88

Bathinda—Amritsar

2

184

736

Talwara—Ludhiana

 2

189

756

Bathinda—Suratgarh

1

160

320

Bathinda—Maur

3

42

252

Talwandi—Musa                      

(via Jhunir)

3

62

372

Maur—Raman (via Kabbee)

2

48

192

Bathinda—Sunam

2

114

456

Sultanpur—Jalandhar

1

65

130

Dabwali—Chandigarh              

(via  Badal)

1

298

596

Talwandi Sabo—Chandigarh

1

228

456

Bathinda—Raman

(via Pakka)

6

43

516

Sultanpur—Talwandi Sabo

1

187

374

Ludhiana—Phagwara

1

44 ½

89

Bathinda—Sanghol Khurd

1

61

122

Bathinda—Delhi

(via  Hisar)

1

372

744

Bathinda—Haridwar

1

399

798

Bathinda—Killianwali

1

60

120

Bathinda—Hoshiarpur

1

241 ½

483

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

 

 

Hoshiarpur—Chimanpura

1

49

98

Bhucho Mandi—Mansa

2

60

240

Talwnadi—Musa

(via Birawala)

3

57

342

Talwandi—Musa

3

51

306

Talwandi Sabo—Amritsar

(via Rampura Baga)

1

275

550

Kalawala—Anandpur

1

340

680

Raman—Chandigarh

1

242

484

Raman—Amritsar

1

249

498

Kot Shamir—Raman

2

26

104

Jiwan Singh Wala—Talwandi

6

11

132

Talwandi Sabo—Sardulgarh

3

42

252

Raman—Kallianwali

3

18

108

Kallianwali—Jalandhar

1

252

504

Bathinda—Saipur (U.P to Rajasthan Border)

1

541

1082

Bathinda—Pehowa

1

224

448

2

Pepsu Road Transport Corporation Bathinda-- II

Bathinda—Ablu Kotli

6

28

336

Patiala—Chandigarh

3

70

420

Bathinda—Malout

21

53

2226

Bathinda—Nathana

16

34

1088

Nathana—Goniana

2

21

84

Nathana—Bhucho Mandi

8

14

224

Bathinda—Maharaj

3

45

270

Maharaj—Dhapali

6

22

264

Bathinda—Patiala

3

177

1062

Bathinda—Chandigarh

1

247

494

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

 

 

Bathinda—Baloh

2

54

216

Bathinda—Firozpur

1

104

208

Patiala—Mandi

1

250

500

Bathinda—Bhucho Mandi

6

20

240

Bathinda—Gidderbaha

4

32

256

Nathana—Bhagta

8

20

320

Bathinda—Pathankot

1

348

696

Bathinda—Moga

(via Nathana)

4

107

856

Bathinda—Moga

(via Rampura)

3

124

744

Rampura—Ballianwali

6

18

216

Rampura—Chaoke

6

19

228

Bathinda—Gurdaspur

1

292

584

Bathinda—Fazilka

3

109

654

Bathinda—Gobindpura

8

16

256

Bathinda—Malerkotla

2

153

612

Bathinda—Bhadaur

2

66

264

Bathinda—Barnala

1

75

150

Bathinda—Ballianwali

2

54

216

Bathinda—Chaoke

1

55

110

Raman Mandi--Patiala

1

221

442

Bathinda—Badal

(via Gidderbaha)

1

56

112

Bathinda—Jhmba

4

26

208

Bhucho Mandi—Ballianwali

4

16

128

Rampura—Jalal

(via Bhai Rupa)

4

32

256

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

 

 

Bathinda—Jaito

4

45

360

Bathinda—Ganga

4

31

248

Bhagta—Baghapurana

2

26

104

Rampura—Moga

1

82

164

Bathinda—Amritsar

(via Faridkot)

1

184

368

Bathinda—Abohar

(via Panniwala)

2

105

420

Nathana—Chandigarh

1

239

478

Goniana—Chandigarh

1

263

526

Raman Mandi-Amritsar

1

227

454

Raman Mandi-Chandigarh

1

290

580

Bathinda—Shimla

1

375

750

Bathinda—Sangrur

2

120

480

Bathinda—Pehowa

1

230

460

Rampura—Firozpur

2

136

544

Rampura—Amritsar

1

195

390

Bathinda—Katra

(via Amritsar)

1

467

934

Bathinda—Agra

(upto Hodel)

1

515

1030

Bathinda—Ambala Cantt.

2

233

932

Patiala—Shimla

(via Kalka)

1

198

396

Rampura—Nathana

6

27

324

3

Pepsu Road Transport Corporation, Budhlada

Bathinda—Faridkot

1

67

134

Patiala—Jakhal

1

91

182

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

 

 

Budhlada—Patiala

3

110

660

Budhlada—Bhikhi

6

17

204

Budhlada—Mansa

(via  Bhikhi)

2

36

144

Mansa—Labhiwal

(via Bhikhi)

3

53

318

Budhlada—Ralla

6

30

360

Budhlada—Bathinda

(via Narinderpura)

2

82

328

Budhlada—Bathinda

(Via Bhikhi)

2

95

380

Bathinda—Jakhal

(via Bhikhi)

5

132

1320

Firozpur—Bathinda

(via Baja Khana)

2

109

436

Mansa—Rattia

5

75

750

Bathinda—Mansa

2

59

236

Mansa—Jakhal

(via Narinderpura)

4

60

480

Budhlada—Jakhal

13

37

962

Budhlada—Sangrur

(via Dhanaula)

1

73

146

Budhlada—Chandigarh

2

180

720

Budhlada—Mansa

(via Narinderpura)

6

23

276

Jakhal—Patran

3

33

198

Mansa—Sirsa

2

69

276

Budhlada—Rattia

11

30

660

Budhlada—Delhi

(via Hisar)

1

284

568

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

 

 

Budhlada—Sardulgarh

2

65

260

Budhlada—Dabwali

1

137

274

Sardulgarh—Rattia

1

35

70

Budhlada—Sherkhan

2

16

64

Budhlada—Maghania

2

20

80

Budhlada—Uddat

4

16

128

Budhlada—Jawalaji

1

288

576

Budhlada—Barnala

6

56

672

Patiala—Kularian

2

103

452

Budhlada—Bareta

4

44

352

Budhlada—Mansa

(via Phaphre Bhai Ke)

6

22

264

Budhlada--Ludhina

2

135

540

Mansa—Budhlada—Sangrur

4

80

640

Budhlada—Dyalgarh

2

55

220

Mansa—Sardulgarh

1

40

80

Samana—Kulrian

2

86

344

Firozpur—Mansa

(via Jaito)

3

155

930

Mansa—Budhlada

(via Khillian)

1

22

44

Budhlada—Mansa

(via Nangal)

3

34

204

Budhlada—Patiala

(via  Jakhepal)

2

108

432

Mansa—Chandigarh

1

182

364

Faridkot—Amritsar

(via Golewala)

1

146

292

Jakhal—Chandigarh

1

161

322

 

Serial No.

Name of the Transport Corporation

Name of route

No. of daily trips

Single length (Km)

Total daily service (Km)

 

 

Uddat—Jhunir

4

24

192

Chandigarh—Dharmgarh

1

154

308

Budhlada—Amritsar

(via Phaphre Bhaike)

1

266

532

Budhlada—Lehra

2

30

120

Budhlada—Goindwal

1

225

450

Budhlada—Hisar

1

102

204

(Source  :  Depot Managers, Pepsu Road Transport Corporation,

Bathinda  I and II and Budhlada)

 

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