Local Bodies- Khanna Civil Hospital is run by one Medical Officer, three Dispensers and one Nurse Dai. The Dakha Dispensary is Staffed by one Assistant Medical Officer, a Dispensary and one Nurse Dai. In the Dehlon Dispensary there is an Assistant Medical Officer, one  Nurse Dai. In Raikot there are one Medical Officer, one Dispenser and one Nurse Dai. In Khanna Lady Municipal Hospital there are a Medical Officer, a Dispenser and a Nurse Dai. In Jagraon there are a Medical Officer, three Dispensers and one Dai. Halwara Dispensary is run by an Assistant Medical Officer, two Disprnsary is run by an Assistant Medical Officer, two Dispensers, one Nurse Dai Besides other Miscellaneous staff.  

 

            On the health side a Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Health (Class II) 7 Medical Officers, 16 Vaids and Hakims, 15 Lady Health Visitors, one Assistant Health Officer ,14, Sanitary Supervisor, 32 Midwives, 19 Dispensers, 10 trained Dais, 9 Nurse Dais besides other miscellaneous staff have been posted under the Chief Medical Officer.

 

            14 Vaccinators including 5 Inspectors Vaccination and Sanitary Sub-Inspectors-cum-Vaccinators, 1 Dispenser along with other miscellaneous staff have been provided by the Zila Parishad.


The Details of the hospital and Dispensaries under the charge of the chief medical officer are given below:

 

List of Hospitals, Primary Centres and Dispensaries in Ludhiana District

 

Serial No

Name of Institution

Number of beds

Rural or urban

Type of management

Area of Location

Male

Female

Tahsil

Block (if any)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

 

Under the control of chief Medical Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Primary Health Centre, Samrala

8

15

Urban

State Public

Samrala

Samrala

2

Primary Health Centre, Payal

6

2

Do

Do

Ludhiana

-

3

Primary Health Centre, Kumkalan

2

2

Rural

Do

Samrala

Mangat

4

Primary Health Centre, Malaudh

20

20

Do

Do

Ludhiana

Dehlo

5

Primary Health Centre, Sahnewal

5

5

Do

Do

Do

Ludhiana

6

Primary Health Centre, Hathur

4

4

Do

Do

Jagraon

Jagraon

7

Primary Health Centre, Hambran

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Sidhwan Bet

8

Primary Health Centre, Pakhowal

6

2

Do

Do

Ludhiana

Doraha

9

Primary Health Unit, Machhiwara

4

4

Do

Do

Smarala

Machhiwara

10

Primary Health Unit, Sidhwan Bit

12

8

Do

Do

Jagraon

Sidhwan Bet

11

Primary Health Unit, Guusar Sadhar

4

4

Do

Do

Do

Sudhar

12

School Health Clinic, Ludhiana

-

-

Urban

Do

Ludhiana

-

13

Provincalised Dispensary,Nurpur

2

2

Do

Do

Do

Mangat

14

Provincalised Dispensary, Gajarwal

2

2

Do

Do

Do

Pakhowal

15

Provincalised Dispensary, Katan Kalan

2

2

Do

Do

Do

Mangat

16

Provincalised Dispensary, Isur

2

2

Do

Do

Samarla

Machhiwara

17

Provincalised Dispensary, Halwars

2

2

Rural

Do

Jagraon

Sadhar

18

Rural Dispensary, Rural

-

-

Do

Do

Ludhiana

Doraha

19

Civil Dispensary, Doraha

-

-

Urban

Do

Do

-

20

Civil Dispensary, Ludhiana

28

12

Do

Do

Do

-

21

Police Hospital, Ludhiana

11

-

Do

State special

Do

-

22

E.S.I. Hospital, Ludhiana

40

40

Do

Do

Do

-

23

Railway Hospital, Ludhiana

6

2

Do

Do

Do

-

24

Canal Dispensary, Ludhiana

-

-

Rural

Do

Do

Ludhiana

25

Canal Dispensary, Doraha

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Doraha

26

Jail Hospital, Ludhiana

18

4

Urban

Do

Do

-

27

Jail Hospital, Khanna

-

-

Do

Do

Do

-

28

Infectious Diseases Hospital, Ludhiana

5

5

Do

Municipal

Do

-

29

Civil hospital, Khanna

48

20

Do

Do

Samrala

-

30

Civil Hospital, Jagraon

17

6

Do

Do

Jagraon

-

31

Civil Dispensary, Railkot

2

2

Do

Do

Ludhiana

-

32

Civil Dispensary, Ludhiana

-

-

Do

Do

Do

-

33

Model Town Dispensary, Ludhiana

-

-

Do

Do

Do

-

34

Women Hospital, Khanna

-

14

Do

Do

Samrala

-

35

Lehrosy Hospital, Khanna

-

-

Urban

Do

Ludhiana

-

36

Civil Dispensary, Dakha

4

2

Rural

Zila Parishad

Jagraon

Sidhwan Bet

37

Civil Dispensary, Dehlon

8

4

Do

Do

Do

Dehlon

38

Rural Dispensary, Buthgarh

-

-

Do

Do

Ludhiana

Mangat

39

Memorial Mission Hospital, Ludhiana

168

324

Urban

Private Aided

Ludhiana

Ludhiana

40

Dayanand Hospital, Ludhiana

143

97

Do

Do

Do

Do

41

Maternity Hospital, Ludhiana

-

81

Do

Do

Do

Do

42

T.B.Clinic, Ludhiana

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Do

43

Bhagwant Memorial Hospital, Narangwal

-

-

Rural

Do

Do

Do

44

Gurbachan Memorial Hospital, Lalton Kalan

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Do

45

Gurbachan Memorial Hospital, Nathowal

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Sudhar

46

Gurbachan Memorial Hospital, Sidhwan Khurd

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Jagraon

47

Gurbachan Memorial Hospital, Bhaini Dareer

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Pakhowal

48

Gurbachan Memorial Hospital, Raohhine

-

-

Do

Do

Do

Do

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Source: Chief Medical Officer, Ludhiana)

 


            Ayurvedic and Unani Hospitals and Dispensaries.- Indigenous system of medicine is cheap and more suited to the Indian Conditions. The Government have accordingly encouraged the indigenous system of medicine and has afforded facilities also for its promotion and propagation. A full fledged Ayurvedic Directorate was opened in the State. Subsequently it was merged with the Health Department. The following Ayurvedic and Unani Dispensaries are functioning in the district:-

 

Ayurvedic and Unani Hospitals and Dispensaries, in Ludhiana

District as on Ist January, 1969

 

S No.

Name/place of Location

Ayurvedic or Unani

Number of beds

Rural or Urban

Type of management

Area of location

Tahsil

Block  (if any)

1

Bahlolpur

Ayurvedic

..

Rural

Government

Samrala

Machhiwara

2

Panigrain

Do

..

Rural

Do

Do

Do

3

Haidon Bet

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Do

4

Dehru

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Samrala

5

Kheri Nand Singh

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Machhiwara

6

Khamano Kalan

Unani

..

Do

Do

Do

Do

7

Sarwarpur

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Samrala

8

Tehara

Ayurvedic

..

Do

Do

Jagraon

Sidhwanbed

9

Roomi

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Jagraon

10

Kaonke Kalan

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Do

11

Sujapur

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Do

12

Mundhian Kalan

Do

..

Do

Do

Ludhiana

Ludhiana

13

jodh

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Pakhowal

14

Dhaul Kalan

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Dehlon

15

Barwala

Unani

..

Do

Do

Do

Ludhiana

16

Jhammat

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Dehlon

17

Payal

Ayurvedic

..

Urban

Do

Do

Do

18

Ghaloti

Do

..

Rural

Do

Do

Doraha

19

Ghurani Kalan

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Do

20

Khanpur

Do

..

Do

Do

Do

Do

(Source: Chief Medical officer, Ludhiana)

 

            (e)  Private Hospitals and Nursing Homes -  In addition to the Government medical services available in the district, as explained above, a few prominent private hospitals in the district are the Mission Hospital, the Daya Nand Hospital and the Ludhiana Maternity Hospital. A brief description of these hospitals would, therefore, be necessary for fuller appreciation of the availability of the medical facilities in the district.

 

            (i)    Brown Memorial Hospital and Christian Medical College, Ludhiana - The Christian Medical College was founded in 1894 by Dr. Miss. Edith Brown. A small dispensary was also maintained in this institution. In 1894 the Memorial Hospital was built. There existed arrangements for the treatment of women only. After 1947 it has converted into a General Hospital.

 

               This is one of the best hospitals in the State and has been provided with the latest equipment.  Necessary facilities for cobalt treatment for cancer, etc., also exist there. the hospital being linked with the Medical College has the services of very competent physicians and surgeons at its disposal. On account of its reputation and efficiency the hospital attracts a large number of patients.

 

            41,609 out door patients and 11,328 in door patients were treated in the hospital during 1966.

 

            (ii)    Daya Nand Medical Hospital, Ludhiana.-  This hospital was started in 1935 in (Madhopuri) Ludhiana. It was shifted to its present building in 1940. It was shifted to its present building in 1940. The Hospital having its links with the Daya Nand Medical College, is of importance and caters to a large number of patients from within and without the city.

 

            In the year 1966 the number of out-doors and in-door patients attended to by the hospital was 43,925 and 6,784 respectively.

 

            (iii)   Kapur Maternity Hospital Ludhiana.- This institution was originally working at Lahore and after partition (1947) it was shifted to Ludhiana to Ludhiana. In the first instance it functioned in an improvised building in the Naulakha Garden. Now it has shifted to Roshni Ground, Ludhiana, and is housed in a newly constructed building. This hospital is rendering very useful service to the women folk from far and near.

 

            7,764 out-door patients and 2,981 in-door patients were attended to in the hospital in the Year 1966. 

 

            (iv)  Akki Bai Hospital, Ludhiana.-  Akki Bal Eye Hospital was opened in 1960. It is managed by a trust. The sources of income of the hospital are shops in the Industrial Areas and G.T. Road rented out and the donations received from the public.

 

            The hospital is provided with 43 beds. It is manned by two doctors two dispensers and two Nurses besides other allied ancillary staff.

 

            31,760 out-door patients and504 in-door patients were treated in the eye hospital in 1966.

 

            Health Education and Propaganda.- Health propaganda and medical services are closely inter-linked, the former being preventive in character while the latter is curative. For  raising the standard of general health is also imperative to launch health propaganda. It includes propagation for cleanliness, use of protected water-supply and better and balanced diet. for achieving the object lectures on health topics are delivered throughout the district. Motors on Public health and prevention from epidemic are written on walls of important places. Pamphlets and leaflets on these topics are distributed. Rural uplift conferences are held by the medical department and lectures on sanitation, water-supply and other public health subjects are periodically delivered. Sides, films-shows and exhibitions on health topics are arranged. World Health topics and family planning weeks are celebrated where people are educated in the field of health. Much progress has not been achieved in changing the habits of people and they do not appear to have taken to balanced diet. the main obstacle in this respect is that the overwhelming majority of the people cannot be weaned from the present from of cooking, whereby many vitamins and minerals, etc., are lost. I this field, too, pamphlets and leaflets are distributed on new methods of cooking which retain essential minerals and vitamins. The growing general education amongst the masses is expected to induce the public to change over to balanced diet.

 

            Maternity and child welfare activities have gained considerable importance after the World War-II when it was found that it Eurpoe large numbers of children and homeless mothers were left over. UNICEF was organised and funds were raised. Scope of this form of held expanded slowly and the work of looking after the mothers and children in all the under devolved countries was taken up by this world organisation. India amongst other countries also got a substantial share of the aid.

 

            Family Planning.- Originally it was a separate scheme. Later it formed a part of maternity and child Welfare centres. During the second Five-Year Plan the Maternity and Child Welfare Centres were opened in the rural areas in the district. This work is being done by the primary Health Centres Units as well. Owing to the alarming increase of population Family Planning Scheme has Acquired paramount importance.

 

            There are Maternity and Child welfare Centres at Gills, Bassian, Khanna, Jagraon and Pakhowal. Each centre is manned by  Lady Health Visitor and a trained Dai.

 

            The Maternity and Child Welfare centre at Miller Ganj and Jawahar Nagar camp at Ludhiana are being run by the Ludhiana Municipality.

 

            There are seven family Planning Units at Samrala, Sidhwan Bet, Sudhar, Kum Kalan, Machhiwara, Schnewal and Payal. Besides, there are three Family Planning Clinics one urban at Civil Hospital, Ludhiana, and two rural at Hatur and Raikot. Every Family Planning Unit is manned by  a Family Planning Extension Educator, 3-4 Lady Health Visitors and 8 midwives, 4 from the Health side 4 from Family planning side.

 

            In addition to the urban Health centre at Jagraon, Maternity Hospital, Ludhiana, and Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, also attend to Family Planning work.

 

            There are 36 non-family Planning Institutions in the district which supply contraceptives in Civil and Rural Dispensaries, Unani and Ayurvedic Dispensaries  and Maternity Child Welfare Centres.

 

            Training Facilities.-  The Punjab Health College attached to the Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, the Daya Nand Medical College, Ludhiana and the Ludhiana Maternity Hospital impart training to Midwives and Nurses. Punjab Health College also Imparts training to Lady Health Visitors.

 

            The workers posted in the Family planning Clinics run by the Ludhiana Branch of the Red Cross Society are given training for 2 months at Patiala.

 

            Flood Medical Relief.-   Prior to 1947 the activities of the Medical Department in the State were of a restricted nature and hence would not render substantial relief to the flood affected areas.  after independence with the  construction to Bhakra Dam, the floods have almost been controlled in the district and on the other hand the activities of the State Medical Department have expanded enormously during the three foregoing Five-year Plans.  At present the Department is in a position to provide substantial relief as and when such a contingency arises.

 

            Heavy floods occurred in the district in 1955 as a result of the result of the torrential rains.  Floods were also experienced in 1957-59 1960 and 1962.  To meet the catastrophe emergency arrangement were made by the State Medical Department.  Its attention was concentrated on medical relief and measures to check epidemic in the affected areas. This relief work was systematically organised in collaboration with the Deputy Commissioner.  The staff of the dispensaries / hospitals, primary health centres and sanitation and vaccination units in the district  was deputed for medical relief work.  Mobile medical teams consisting of Doctors, Dispensaries and Sanitary Inspector were rushed to the affected areas.  medicines disinfectants, insecticides, antibiotics, etc., were made available freely. Besides, the Ludhiana Red Cross Branch also distributed medicines, skimmed milk and clothes among the flood-affected people.

 

            Prevention of Adulteration of Food Stuffs.-  To check adulteration of Food an Act named Prevention of  Food Adulteration Act, 1954, was passed.  Under the said Act, samples are taken by the staff appointed for the purpose and duly sealed are sent to the Chemical Laboratory for analysis.  This persons whose samples are not found up to the mark are challenged under the Act.

 

            Two Government Food Inspector, 2 Sanitary Inspectors, 4 Medical Officers (for Jagraon, Samrala, Payal and Doraha); 8 Sanitary Inspectors under the Ludhiana Municipal Committee, a Sanitary Additional Food Inspector under Khanna Municipal Committee and A Sanitary Committee and a Sanitary/Additional Food Inspector under Raikot Municipality have been appointed for checking the adulteration in food stuffs.

 

            The work done under the said Act is detailed in Appendix IV at page 584.

 

            The School Health Service.-  The School Health Service Scheme was launched in the district during the Second Five-Year Plan.  Under the scheme a school Health Clinic was started  in Ludhiana in 1957.  A medical Officer,  a Dental Surgeon, 1 Public Health Nurse, 3 Dispensers besides other miscellaneous staff have been provided in the clinic.  Under this scheme the doctors visit the schools, examine the school children and provide them necessary medical aid.  They deliver lectures to the children regarding good habits.  They also enlighten them about general hygiene and cleanliness to be maintained in the Schools.  The work done by the clinic from 1959 onwards may be described as follows : -

 

Year

 

No. of schools visited

No. of students examined

No. of students treated

No. of students examined by Dental Surgeon

No. of students given mass treatment for trachoma

Mass treatment yereohetitive

1959

..

28

3,045

5,989

269

-

-

1960

..

31

5,437

9,493

1,638

-

-

1961

..

32

6,582

7,835

4,712

-

-

1962

..

30

6,054

9,513

3,497

-

134

1963

..

29

6,935

14,401

6,830

-

223

1994

..

30

5,065

17,531

5,065

3,500

306

1965

..

30

5,044

7,334

5,044

3,156

1,075

1966

..

30

5,301

8,614

5,049

1,749

-

1967

..

30

5,439

10,727

5,112

1,609

-

1968

..

29

4,666

12,139

4,560

1,377

-

 

 

            In the rural areas, the School Health Services are looked after by the Medical Officers incharge of the  Primary Health Centres/Units.  Medical Examinations by the Medical Officer are assisted by the Sanitary Inspector/Dispenser and the Lady Health Visitors. The Medical Officers Incharge, Provincial Rural Dispensaries, look after the medical needs of the school children in their respective areas of jurisdiction.

 

            Blood Bank.-  There are three Blood Banks in the district.  One is maintained by the Red Cross Society and is located in the Daya Nand Medical College, Ludhiana.  In the year 1961-62, the second Blood Bank was also started by Brown Memorial Hospital, Ludhiana.  The third Blood Bank was started in Civil Hospital, Ludhiana, from 1965.  the Blood Bank maintained by Brown Memorial Hospital has necessary equipment to make blood agar from ‘Discarded bottle’.  The work done by these Blood Banks in respect of collection and transfusion of blood is given in Appendix V at page 583.

 

            The history of the drainage system in the district dates back to the beginning of the 19th century when surface central drains were laid out in Ludhiana, Khanna, Raikot and Jagraon.  At Khanna a boali (tank) was built in the heart of the town.  It is said to have been constructed by Mai Sada Kaur.  The reservoir was filled with water drawn by means of Persian Wheels and water was let out to flush the central surface frains in the town.  At Ludhiana, Raikot and Jagraon the drains were cleaned by pouring water.  The Central surface drainage system was found unsatisfactory as the pucca streets had drains in the centre and from every house a short straight sloping surface drain joined the central surface drain.  It was very difficult to move about in the street during nights and especially when the drains remained blocked.

 

            About the eighties of the 19th Century the system of surface central drainage was change to that of side surface drains.  This was decidedly better than the prevalent system.  Under the surface side drain system, there were two surface drains running on both sides and from the centre there was slope towards both sides.  This system of drains still exists in the towns of the district.

 

            Since the partition of the country the drainage system in the district has undergone a significant change.  The concept of underground drainage has been generally knowledge to be the best.  In Ludhiana proper the first colony which could boast of the underground drainage system was the Model Town.  Gradually the scope of this system was enlarged.  By 1969 the facility of underground drainage has been extended to Jawahar Nagar Camp, Gill Road, Bharat Nagar and Civil Lines including the Agricultural University areas.

 

The main hurdle in the way of rapid extension of the system of drainage, however, is that residents of these localities are not willingly applying for underground drainage connections.  The municipality can, however, require residents to adopt underground drainage but authorities can, however, require residents to adopt underground drainage but authorities are not imposing it stringently to avoid uncalled for opposition.  It will take a long time, therefore, to introduce underground drainage in the interior of the city.  This is due partly to the lack of adequate funds with the municipality and partly to the luke warm  co-operation of residents of the area.

 

Ludhiana Municipality has also not been able to make adequate arrangements for the utilisation of the Sewerage water.  At present all the surface drains invariably fall into the Budha Nala.  At one spot the municipality has constructed an over bridge over Budha Nala to utilize drainage water.  Unless proper arrangements for the utilization of drainage water are made the surface drainage cannot be changed to underground drainage system.

Underground drainage is the panacea for all the ills of surface drainage.  Files and mosquito’s can thereby be effectively controlled.  Hygienic conditions can only be ensured with the underground drainage.  Disease like malaria, diarrohea can also be checked through the system.  The provision of underground drainage in big towns and cities will not only improves their general cleanliness ; but will also greatly better the working conditions of scavengers.

 

APPENDIX   I

Birth and Death Rate in Ludhiana District, 1946-68 (vide page 565)

 

Year

Birth rate per thousand of population

Death rate per thousand of population

Infantile mortality rate under I year of age against per thousand live births

1946

38.14

19.03

172.49

1947

32.09

18.95

193.34

1947

29.73

12.42

128.86

1949

33.52

12.35

121.25

1950

33.22

15.64

125.59

1951

34.33

13.16

114.57

1952

35.35

14.02

125.64

1953

35.96

16.35

124.13

1954

41.76

13.46

109.26

1955

46.53

14.00

104.56

1956

45.66

15.72

116.28

1957

45.16

14.85

106.75

1958

45.19

16.13

115.85

1959

43.51

14.74

116.00

1960

44.19

15.54

115.39

1961

35.12

11.37

99.00

1962

34.95

1158

108.03

1963

36.04

11.30

88.07

1964

36.44

11.62

898.17

1965

32.88

10.57

85.24

1966

30.39

10.17

83.21

1967

30.10

8.89

73.34

1968

28.54

8.80

69.84

 

(Source : Chief Medical Officer, Ludhiana)

(Figures relate to the calendar Year)

APPENDIX II

 

Important Causes of Mortality in Ludhiana District, 1946-68

(vide pages 565-70)

 

Year

Cholera

Small-Pox

Plague

Fever

Dysen

tery

Respira-tory diseases

Injuries

Others

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1946

3

38

-

12,850

198

1,373

198

2,774

1947

76

160

-

13,289

305

1,146

247

2,283

1947

3

185

-

7,783

201

916

224

2,238

1949

-

19

-

8,563

173

1,063

143

1,638

1950

-

25

-

10,173

168

1,239

116

2,387

1951

-

34

-

8,984

158

1,001

132

1,,900

1952

-

12

-

8,868

169

1,086

185

1,775

1953

-

20

-

9,895

151

1,110

184

1,979

1954

-

7

-

7,596

152

1,085

179

1,883

1955

-

2

-

7,494

162

1,214

236

2,241

1956

-

1

-

7,126

296

2,757

251

2,326

1957

-

1

-

5,691

286

3,285

181

2,613

1958

-

2

-

6,163

269

3,607

241

2,827

1959

-

4

-

6,299

230

2,282

238

2,856

1960

-

1

-

7,197

304

2,445

212

2,497

1961

-

4

-

6,312

213

2,505

235

2,342

1962

-

6

-

6,924

254

2,438

183

2,363

1963

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1964

-

3

-

7,062

185

1,785

200

3,266

1965

-

10

-

6,522

190

2,270

229

3,233

1966

-

6

-

6,397

174

1,902

207

3,432

1967

-

3

-

6,028

26

1,140

138

3,882

1968

-

-

-

7,127

78

1,162

108

2,265

(Source : Chief Medical Officer, Ludhiana)

(Calendar year)

 

APPENDIX  III

Incidence of smallpox in Ludhiana District, 1952-68 (vide page 569)

 

Year

No of cases

No of deaths

No of locali-ties inspected

Primary vaccination

Re-vaccina-tion

1952

69

12

23

23,353

67,237

1953

104

20

38

34,516

1,59,273

1954

45

7

8

30,969

66,287

1955

14

2

6

34,857

84,619

1956

10

1

3

34,969

65,646

1957

5

1

2

35,528

1,18,276

1958

27

2

8

35,705

1,36,564

1959

13

4

6

37,257

1,19,223

1960

1

1

1

35,951

1,17,811

1961

10

6

7

36,634

1,,40,212

1962

63

6

19

36,636

2,25,041

1963

91

10

24

44,803

7,11,509

1964

10

2

3

50,116

3,76,089

1965

5

1

1

38,904

63,927

1966

21

6

6

43,408

93,728

1967

16

3

11

38,446

2,42,436

1968

-

-

-

48,064

97,032

(Source: Chief Medical Officer, Ludhiana)

 

 

APPENDIX   IV

 

Work done under the prevention of food Adulteration Act, 1954,

in Ludhiana District, 1959-68 (Vide page 579)

 

Year

Total No of samples seized

Total No of samples sent for analysis

Found Adultered

Prosecu-tions launched

Fine realied

Imprison-ment

1959

1,472

1,472

294

298

16,515

7

1960

1,252

1,252

3,984

381

17,640

2

1961

1,676

1,676

364

322

37,197

..

1962

..

..

..

..

..

..

1963

..

..

..

..

..

..

1964

1,937

1,937

479

425

16,081

1

1965

2,412

2,406

326

361

23,296

12

1966

2,183

2,186

338

316

23,460

9

1967

843

843

233

237

42,650

5

1968

879

879

341

300

25,400

-

 

(Source : Chief Medical Officer, Ludhiana)


APPOENDIX  V

Blood Bank  in Ludhiana District in 1965-68

 

Name of Institution

Year

Donors  of Blood

Blood given

Trans-fusion

Blood collected in CCs

Blood discharged in CCs

Blood grouping

Blood matching

Blood injected in CCs

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1. Civil Hospital, Ludhiana

1965

1,579

1,579

1,579

4,73,700

-

2,836

1,738

-

 

1966

-

-

-

-

-

12

..

-

 

1967

9

9

9

9

9

18

9

-

 

1968

21

21

21

21

21

84

21

-

2. Daya Nand Hospital, Ludhiana

1966

1,879

1,879

1,879

5,63,700

-

3,348

2,190

-

 

1967

2,049

2,048

2,048

6,14,700

1

3,883

2,527

-

 

1968

1,737

1,734

1,734

5,21,100

1

3,605

2,414

-

3. Christian Medical College and Brown Memorial Hospital, Ludhiana

1965

2,860

-

-

9,72,000

-

..

4,729

-

 

1966

2,647

2,554

2,554

8,73,510

-

5,084

5,084

-

 

1967

2,596

2,534

2,534

8,56,680

-

5,197

5,197

-

 

1968

2,689

2,601

2,601

8,87,370

-

5,248

5,248

-

 


 

 

 

CHAPTER XVII

OTHER SOCIAL SERVICES

 

v    

Labour Welfare

v    

Prohibition

v    

Advancement of Scheduled Castes and Backward Classes

v    

Welfare Department

v    

Public Trusts, Charitable Endowments, Muslim Wakfs, etc.

 

 

 

            Social service signifies such activities of the State and individuals as are undertaken to correct social disequilibrium between individuals, classes or groups.  Their scope has been continually widening.  All governmental activities of progressive modern States have for their ultimate objective the general well being of the community.  The State also renders many speciallsed service in the various spheres, e.g., education, public health, housing, etc.  The modern welfare State is thus,  built on a strong framework of social service.  The successive Five-Year Paln have also provided the necessary opportunities and scope for the expansion of social services.

 

(a)  Labour Welfare

 

            Labour welfare assumes vast importance in a State which has launched upon progressive industrialisation and the consequent urbanization.  Welfare of labour implies provision of services, facilities and amenities as may be established in, or in the vicinity of, undertakings, to enable the persons employed in them to perform their work in health, congenial surroundings, and provide them with amenities, conducive to good health and sound morals.  Labour welfare work may, thus, be broadly divided into three categories : statutory, voluntary and mutual.

 

            Statutory welfare constitutes provisions for welfare work which depend for their observance on the coercive power of the Government.  Under voluntary welfare come the activities undertaken by the employers for the workers.  Mutual welfare is a co-operative enterprise of the workers to improve their lot in a suitable manner.

 

            The origin of welfare work in India may be traced to the World War I (1914-18).  Till then, welfare of the workers was hardly thought of owing to the ignorance and illiteracy of the workers themselves, the short-sightedness of the employers, the indifference of the State and apathy of the public.  But, since the World War I, it has been expanding steadily, mostly on a voluntary basis.  The economic depression, however, did much to dampen the interest in welfare work which the War had kindled.  The Government as  well as industrialists were prompted to take active interest in welfare work due to the discontent and industrial unrest that prevailed in the country, and to some extent on account of the moral pressure brought to bear on them by the work of the International Labour Office.  The World War II (1939-45) once again revived and strengthened the welfare movement, and the benefits resulting from a proper regard for the health and well-being of the employees were gradually recognised and employers co-operated with the Government in the provision of improved amenities.  Active interest in welfare activities has survived the impact of the World War II.  Though the welfare work in India is still considerably below the standards attained in other countries, it has come to stay.

 

            Till the World War II, very little was done by the Government in the field of labour welfare except holding of Labour Conferences and making recommendations.  This conservative policy as regards labour welfare seems to have been mainly influenced by the conditions and exigencies created by the World War II (1939-45).

 

            Prior to Independence, there was no systematic and regular Governmental organisation for prevention and settlement of industrial disputes, for welfare of Industrial workers and for dealing with other labour problems in the state.  A separate Labour Department to look after the labour welfare was established as late as 1949.  When the Labour Office was originally established at Ludhiana in 1956, Ludhiana formed the headquarters of the Labour Officer who was known as the Labour Officer, Ludhiana Circle, Ludhiana.  on shifting of his headquarters from Ludhiana to Patiala, in October 1961, he came to be known as the Labour Officer, Patiala Circle, Patiala and his jurisdiction extended over Patiala, Bhatinda, Sangrur, Ludhiana and Ferozepore Districts.  For Ludhiana district, he is assisted by 2 Labour Inspectors, who are further assisted by one Factory Inspector and 2 Shop Inspectors, all of whom are stationed at Ludhiana.  the municipal area of Jagraon is, however, under the charge of the Shop Inspector, Moga (district Ferozepore).

 

Besides, there is a Concilliation Officer, with headquarters at Ludhiana.1

 

1.  In September, 1967, the Conciliation Officer, Ludhiana, was made Labour-cum-Conciliations Officer, Ludhiana circle, Ludhiana.  In January, 1968 another Labour-cum-Conciliations Officer, with headquarters at Ludhiana, was appointed for Ludhiana Circle-II, which includes Ferozepore district and a part of Ludhiana District.

 

            Thus, from the beginning of 1968, the staff of the Labour Department, posted at Ludhiana was as under :

 

            Labour-cum-Conciliation Officer, Ludhiana Circle I, Ludhiana**

 

            Labour-cum-Conciliation Officer, Ludhiana Circle II, Ludhiana**

 

            Factory Inspector                                                                                       ..         1

           

            Labour Inspectors                                                                                       ..          3

           

            Shop Inspectors                                                                                          ..          2

 

            (**Ludhiana Circle-I covers major part of Ludhiana District, while Ludhiana Circle-II comprises Ferozepore District and a part of Ludhiana District (Covering In dustrial Area ‘A’)

 

 

For Official administration of Labour laws and for successful implementation of labour welfare measures, the State is divided into Jullundur and Patiala Circles.  Ludhiana District is included in the latter Circle.

 

Although under the immediate control of the Labour Officer, Patiala Circle, Patiala, the Shop inspectors function under the Chief Inspector of Shops and Commercial Establishments-cum-Labour Officer (Headquarters), Chandigarh.  The Shop Inspectors are responsible for the administration of the Punjab Shops and Commercial Establishments Act, 1958, the Minimum Wages Act, 1948, and the Payment of Wages Act, 1936.

 

The Factories Act, 1948, is administered by the Factory Inspector, Ludhiana.  The labour Inspectors, the Labour Officer, Patiala Circle, Patiala, and the conciliation Officer, Ludhiana, act as Additional Inspectors of Factories.  Besides, the Deputy Chief Medical Officer of  Health, Ludhiana, also functions as additional Inspector of Factories for enforcing the health and sanitary provisions contained in the Act.

 

The Conciliation Officer, Ludhiana,2 is also the Conciliation Officer for the district under the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947.  He initiates conciliation proceedings for the settlement of Industrial disputes and tries to settle disputes by mediation and by joint discussion.  If he fails the matter is referred through Government to the Labour court, Jullundur3, or the Industrial Tribunal, Punjab,  Chandigarh4.

 

               2.   The Jurisdiction of the Conciliation Officer, Ludhiana, extended to the entire city prior to September, 1968.  Thereafter one more Conciliation Officer was appointed.  Their designations are changed to that of Labour-cum-Conciliation Officer Circle No. I and II.  The jurisdiction of the first extends to Industrial Area ‘B’ and city and the other’s to Industrial Area ‘A’ and Ferozepore district.

 

3.   The jurisdiction of the Labour Court, Jullundur, extends to the whole of the Punjab State.  Its functions are mainly of quasi-judicial nature.

 

               4.   Appointed under section 7-A of the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947, the Industrial Tribunal, Punjab, Chandigarh, plays a very important role in the redress of grievances of the industrial workers in the State.  The Presiding Officer of the Industrial Tribunal frequently visits Ludhiana for adjudication of industrial disputes relating to any matter specified in schedules II and III of the Act.

 

 

Contents        Next