CHAPTER VII

COMMUNICATIONS

 

Contents

Ø       

Old-time Roads and Highways and Modes and Modes of Conveyance

Ø       

Road Transport

Ø       

Railways

Ø       

Waterways, Ferries and Bridges

Ø       

Air Transport

Ø       

Travel and Tourist Facilities

Ø       

Posts, Telegraphs and Telephones

Ø       

Organisations of Owners and Employees in the Field of Transport and Communications

 

(a) Old-time Roads and Highways and Modes and Modes of Conveyance

Economic development of region depends, to a greater extent, upon its means of communications – roads, railways, airlines, inland navigation, ferries and bridges, gas and oil-pipes lines. Of all these modes of communication, roads, metalled or unmettalled, are the most universal, and, perhaps and oldest, to be used by man. Even today, no territory can enjoy the fruits of progress unless it is well served by a good network of roads, Construction of roads is not only helpful in the development of industries for transportation of raw metarials from the source and of finished goods to centers of consumption, agricultural development is also promoted by roads connecting market towns and rural areas. Indian history if full of references which bear testimony to the existence or roads and the keen interest taken by the ancient, medieval and modern rulers of erstwhile states in the construction of roads. Chandragupta Maurya, Ashoka, Muhammad Tughlaq and Sher Shah Suri are known to have constructed a good network of roads connecting various parts of their domains.

Before the advent of automobile vehicles and railways, the usual modes of conveyance in the district were the domesticated animals like bullocks, and the beasts of burden like camels, horses and donkeys these were used not only for undertaking long distance journeys but also for transportation of goods from one place to another. Besides, bullockcarts and tongas were used by the people to travel reasonable distances. However, with development of rail and road transport, old modes of transport were abandoned in favour of the modern ones. Today, even in the country side, people have started using modern means of transport. 

 

(b) Road Transport

Roads in the country have been often compared to arteries in a human body as they play a vital role in the gigantic task of national reconstruction. The territory of the present Sangrur District comprises parts of the erstwhile princely states of Patiala, Jind and Nahba; the Muslims States of Malerkotla; and some portions of the British territory then forming part of Ludhiana District. The metalled and unmettalled roads were maintained by the rulers of the then princely states. The roads maintained by the erstwhile princely states in the territory now comprising Sangrur District were; Patiala-Sunam, Patiala-Sangrur, Nobha-Kotla, Barnala-Hadiaya, Jakhal-Moonak, Hadiaya-Bhikhi, Sangrur-Kotla, Sangrur-Nabha, Nabha-Bhawanigarh, Sangrur-Khilrian, Sangrur-Badrukhan, Sangrur-Jind, Dhanaula-Barnala, Ludhiana-Malerkotla, Nabha-Bagrian, Sangrur-Dhuri, Malerkotla-Sherwani Kot, Malerkotla-Panjgirain, Malerkotla-Kanganwal, Malerkotla-Kup, Kup-Panjgirain, etc. After the Independence, road construction got proper attention and now there is a network of roads in the district. The following figures give an India of extension of roads in the district:

Year

Metalled roads (km)

Un-metalled roads (km)

Total length of roads (km)

1950-51

          165

40

205

1955-56

          330

6

336

1960-61

          695

115

810

1977-78

       2,210

491

2,701

(Source: Punjab District Census Hand-book No. 17, Sangrur District 1961, P. 19 and Superintending Engineer, Construction Circle P. W. D. (B & R), Sangrur)

(i) Classification of Roads

According to the Nagpur Road Plan of 1943, roads were classified into four categories, namely, National Highways, State Highways, District Roads and Village Roads. The total road length in 1977-78 in the Sangrur District was 2,701 km. The length of State Highways was 166.7 Kms, district major roads 219.5 km, other district roads 200.6 km, and other district village roads 2,114.2 km. There is National Highway passing through the Sangrur District. The State Highways, District major roads, minor roads, and other district roads are maintained by the Public Works Department (B & R). The various municipalities maintain roads within their respective municipal areas. A detailed description of each category of roads in the Sangrur District is given below:

State Highway. – These are main or arterial roads of the State and are generally connected to the National Highways. Sometimes they connect highways of adjacent States and also district headquarters or important cities. These are constructed and maintained by the Public Works Department of the State. The highways passing through the Sangrur District are: State Highway No. 10, from Badalgarh (Tahsil Sunam) to Rampura Ganota (Tahsil Sunam) 22.63 km; State Highway No. 11, from Momanabad (Tahsil Malerkotla) to Kakuwala and Sindranwala (Tahsil Sunam) 89.43 km; and State Highway No. 13, from Ramgarh to Pakko (Tahsil Barnala) 54.70 km.

District Major Roads. – These roads connect the areas of production and markets with each other and also with highways or railways. In fact these roads provide hauling service even into the heart of rural areas throughout the year. These are also constructed and maintained by the Public Works Department (B & R) of the State. On 31 March 1978, the total length of such roads in the district was 219.5 km.

Other District Roads. – These serve as important arteries of communication among different parts of the district. Their total length in the district, as on 31 March 1978, was 200.6 km.

Under this head are also included roads constructed and maintained by the local bodies (municipal committees) out of their own funds. Such roads connect the local markets, streets, State Highways, National Highways, railway stations and other roads in the area of a particular municipal committee.

Now’ Other District roads’ also include the roads formerly falling under the head ‘district minor roads’, the term which is no longer used to described this category of roads.

Village Approach Roads. – These roads connect villages or group of villages with one another and to the nearest district roads. Such roads are intended to serve the interior rural areas. These are constructed by the collective efforts of the villagers. Previously, these roads were maintained by the Zila Parishad, Sangrur, but now these have been transferred to the State Public Works Department. The total length of these roads in the district as on 31 March 1978, was 2,114.2 km.

(ii) Vehicles and Conveyances

In the urban areas, motor vehicles are fast replacing bullock-carts, as means of conveyance. However, in the countryside, the bullock-carts are still being used as means of transport. The bullock-carts are being fitted with pneumatic rubber tyres in place of traditional wooden wheels. Outside the town areas, the horse drawn vehicles (tongas, ekkas etc.) used for the carriage of passengers have largely been replaced by the motor bus. In mandis, however, they still continue to flourish side by side with motor vehicles for the transportation of goods.

Common pack animals, mules, horses, camels, donkeys, etc. are used for transporation of foodgrains and vegetables in the towns, but they are being replaced by cheap wheeled traffic. The thelas pulled by one or two men and used mostly in cities to carry goods from one place to another within the city limits are also being replaced by quicker modes of transportation. The quicker means of conveyance now used are buses, cars, jeeps, trucks, taxis, motor-cycles, scooters and tempos. Tractor have now become a popular means of transport with well-to-do farmers. The people have become speed conscious and prefer to travel by mechanized vehicles. All these quick modes of transport are often used only by mechanized vehicles. All these quick modes of transport are often used only by the well-to-do people or others in emergency. The public in general, especially the ordinary citizen, still finds the bicycle a more reliable companion for short journeys.

Automobiles. – Though the automobile was invented in 1839, it became common means of travel and of transportation of goods for long distances. Its speed and reliability enable the user to cover a wider area in the minimum of time and with the minimum of trouble.

Automobiles include motor-cycle, scooters, jeeps, motor cars, taxis, buses, trucks, tractors and auto-rickshaws. The number of different types of motor vehicles registered in the district, during 1974-1978, is given in Appendix I and page 199.

Bicycles. – Cycle has become very popular as a means of conveyance for short distances. It is economical in cost and can be put to multiple used. One can easily afford it without incurring considerable maintenance cost. It is an essential means of conveyance in big cities, especially for poor and lower middle class people; it has increased the mobility of labour. Now a days villagers bring vegetables, milk and other agricultural produce to urban markets on cycles. It is cheap, flexible and handy without having standing charges.

Cycle- Rickshaws. – Cycle-rickshaw is a three-wheeled cycle pulled by a man with a sitting capacity of two persons and is used to cover short distances, generally within the city areas. It is a cheap, convenient and easy type of conveyance. Its charges are low and it has not to wait for passengers for long as only tow persons make the full load of a rickshaw; even if a single passenger has to hire the full rickshaw, he does not mind paying the full charges keeping in view the time saved and the comfort provided in the single-passengers journey. The rickshaw has the added advantage of its ability to pass through narrow streets. With these advantages, it has become popular in the district. Due to its popularity, the importance of tongas and ekkas has decreased. The construction of villages and vice versa. The persons who are physically fit and are between the age of 18 and 45 can ply this vehicle according to the bye-laws framed by the State Government. Under the scheme ‘Rickshaws Chalak (puller) Rickshaw malik (owner)’, loans are procured by the State Government from commercial banks so as to enable the rickshaw-Pullers to purchase their own rickshaws-pullers to purchase their own rickshaws. Interest of these loans is reimbursed in full by the government Under the Punjab Cycle Rickshaw (Regulation of Licence) Act, 1976, liceces are issued to the owners only.

Horse Carriages. – Even though buses and rickshaws are plying in all towns of the district, horse carriages are still used under the changed name ‘horse carts’. The farmers and shopkeepers who cannot afford tractors (trollies) have maintained horse carts. As a means of conveyance, these carts are very helpful in carrying passengers and for carriage of goods from one part of the city to another, from town to town, from town to villages and vice versa. There is tough competition between the horse-drawn carriages, motor buses and cycle-rickshaws in which the horse carriages, like tonga and ekka have been hard hit. The rates of horse carriages are, however, quite reasonable and this is a major factor for their survival.

(iii) Public and Private Transport

The Provincial Transport Controller headed the Transport Department till June 1969. He was responsible for the enforcement of Motor Vehicles Act and the rules framed thereunder. The commercial wing of the department also functioned under his control. In order to give equal justice to the private operators and State owned transport, the Transport Department was bifurcated in June 1969, in two wings, viz. the Commercial Wing and Non-Commercial Wing. The formers, known as Punjab Roadways, was placed under the control of Director, State Transport, Punjab, and the latter under the State Transport Commissioner, Punjab, as Heads of the Departments. The Director, State Transport, being overall incharge of the Commercial wing, is concerned with the development and operation of State transport buses on commercial basis. The State transport Commissioner is concerned with the issuing of route permits, enforcement of the Motor Vehicles Act and the rules framed thereunder, grant of route permits for stage carriers to both public and private operators and for public carriers, tempos, taxis, etc.

Before the Independence, road transport was largely in the hands of private owners, who were interested mainly in large profits and seldom cared for the convenience of passengers. With the increase in the network of roads and rapid industrialization, road transport has expanded manifold. Therefore, the Government have started gradual and progressive nationalization of this service. At present, there is a partial nationalization of passenger transport service in the State and 60:40 scheme is in operation. Under this scheme, all further operations on the existing local routes not exceeding 16 km in length as well as monopoly routes shall be undertaken exclusively by the Punjab Roadways.

State Owned Services. – Most of the bus routes in the district are operated by the Sangrur depot of PEPSU Road Transport Corporation. This depot was set-up on 12 December 1970. The details of the routes operated by the Pepsu Road Transport Corporation, Sangrur are given in Appendix II at the end of the Chapter on pages 204-209.

Private Bus Service – A number of bus routes in the district are operated by the privatye transport companies. The particulars regaring the names of the private companies and the routes operated by them are given in Appendix II at the end of the chapter on 204-209.

Goods Transport by Road. – It is entirely in the hands of private companies and owners. The State Government if following liberal policy for the grant of public carrier permits. Anybody who comes forward with a mechanically fit and road worthy vehicle is issued a truck permit. To facilitate inter-State movement of trucks for the transportation of goods from one State to another, the State Government has entered into liberal agreements with other States to facilitate free flow of goods throughout the country.

(c) Railways

The Sangrur District is in the jurisdiction of Delhi Division of Northern Railway, but is backward in the regard to rail density per unit area. There are only two railway lines passing through the district: Ludhiana-Jakhal and Ambala-Bathinda lines. The Ahmedarh to Gurney section of the Ludhiana-Jakhal line, falling in the present Sangrur District, was opened on 10 April 1901 at the expense of the erstwhile princely states of Jind and Malerkotla, who contributed respectively 4/5th and 1/5th of its cost of construction. This is a broad gauge with a single track. The 14 railway stations falling on this line in the district are: Ahmedgarh, Rohira Halt, Kup, Malerkotla, Himtana, Dhuri, Bahadur Singh Wala, Sangrur, Bharur, Sunam, Chhajli, Gobindgarh Khokhar, Lehragaga and Gurney. The other railway one passing through the Sangrur District is known as Ambala-Bathinda line. The 9 railway stations falling on this line are: Kaulseri, Dhuri, Rajomajrai, Alal, Sekha, Barnala, Hadiaya, Ghunas halt ant Tapa. Dhuri is the only railway junction in the district. The total route length of railways in the district is approximately 152 km. The average route length per 100 sq. km. Of the area works out to only 2.9 km in the district. 

Appendices IV and V (Pages 210 to 211) show the monthly average of railway passengers, goods traffic and earnings in the district during 1977-78.

Rail-Road Competition. – Every means of transport has its own sphere of economic service and its limitations. The problem of competition between various means of transport arises when some modes of transport extend a far and cut into the sphere of other means of transport. The road system in India was not properly developed until the end of the First World War when Government took up road construction on priority basis. The Railway Board Report of 1926-27 pointed out that the Indian Railways had begun to feel the pressure of competition from motor vehicles. The main complaint of the railways against the competing road vehicles was that on account of the flexible character of their service, the road vehicles were free to choose the best paying traffic. Railways had no such flexibility and as common carriers they had to accept whatever was offered to them. In 1933, government of India appointed the Mitchell Kirkness Committee to study the problems and make suggestions for improving the situation. The Committee recommended a strict regulation of road traffic to eliminate competition. In 1937, the Wedge-wood Committee also recommended the protection of railways against unfair competition from road transport by controlling, supervising, regulating and licensing of motor vehicles. In 1939, the Motor Vehicles Act was passed for regulating motor transport. During the Second World War (1939-45), there was practically no rail-road competition. In 1950, Government appointed the Motor Vehicles Taxation Inquiry Commission which recommended the imposition of taxes on motor vehicles. Consequently, the rail-road competition was reduced due to heavy taxes imposed on road vehicles. However, with the development of agriculture and industry in the country and the consequent increase in traffic, the rail-road competition has become a thing of the past, and the two systems of transport are co-operating with each other to meet the increasing demands of modern industrilisation and scientific agriculture.

 

(d) Waterways, Ferries and Bridges

Waterways. – There is no navigable river/canal in the Sangrur District.

Ferries. – Before 1966, in the Sangrur District there were two ferries on the river Ghaggar in Tahsil Sangrur; on at Usmanpur and the other near the village of Nanhera on the Kaithal road. These were maintained by the State during the rainy season, and were operated in the months of Sawan and Bhadon by the mallahs, who charged two annas a person[P1] . But in 1966, on the reorganization of the erstwhile Punjab State this part of the Sangrur District was allocated to the Haryana State. Presently, the ferry system is not prevalent in the district.

Bridges. – Bridges are constructed over the chos, streams, canals etc. for smooth running of road traffic.

 

(e) Air Transport

There is no aerodrome in the district. The nearest civil airport is Chandigarh, at a distance of 126 km from Sangrur. From there, regular air service is available to New Delhi, Amritsar, Jammu and Srinagar, and in summer, to leh and Kulu. From May 1982, Ludhiana, at a distance of 80 km from Sangrur, has also come on the air map of India. Regular air service between Ludhiana and New Delhi is operated by Vayudoot, the feeder airline in the Public sector.

 

(f) Travel and Tourist Facilities

It is State Government’s endeavour to develop tourist facilities at existing places with a view to ensuring that the available potential for growth of tourist industry is fully exploited. One spot of tourist attraction is being run by the Punjab Tourism Development Corporation at Khanauri where snack bar and beer bar facilities are available.

The District does not have any first class modern hotel; there are, however, a number of restaurants and hotels in urban areas. In some of the hotels, lodging facilities are also available. Besides there are a number of dharamshalas and serais in the district for travelers, tourists and visitors. Gurdwaras in urban as well as in rural areas provide free boarding and lodging to visitors.

Dak Bungalows and Rest Houses. – These are maintained by various departments of Government for the use of their employees while on official tour to the district. However, when available these might be utilized by members of the public for private occupation on prescribed rent which is higher than that chargeable from Government officials on tour. A list of dak bungalows and rest houses in the district is given in Appendix VI, on pages 212 to 213

 

(g) Posts, Telegraphs and Telephones

Post offices in the district are under the control of Superintendent, Post Offices, Sangrur, who assists the Senior Superintendent of Post Offices, Patiala Division, Patiala, in respect of the Sangrur District. To provide postal facilities to the public, letter boxes have been affixed at important centers in the towns which are cleared at fixed intervals, twice or thrice a day. All the village of the Sangrur District are covered under daily delivery.

The Postal Index Number (PIN) code was introduced in the country on 15 August 1972. It is a six digit code that identifies and locates every departmental delivery service. It provides with a built-in routing information for postal sorting and quick delivery of the post. The PIN Code of Sangrur is 148001[P2] .

On 31 March 1978, there were one Head Post Office, 34 sub Post Offices and 205 Branch Post Offices in the district. A list of these is given in Appendix VII on pages 214-218.

Telegraphs. – The district is served by a good number of combined post and telegraph offices. There are two (one Head and one Sub) TP/Morse officers, 6 Morse Sub-Offices and 13 Phono-cum-Offices and one extra Department Sub-Office in the district. There is prompt delivery of telegrams in the district. On 31 March 1978, telegraph facility was available in 22 Post offices in the Sangrur District, as given in Appendix VIII, on page 219.

Telephones. – There are 17 telephone exchanges in the district functioning at Sangrur, Bhawanigarh, Bhadaur, Dhuri, Dhanaula, Longowal, Lehragaga, Mahal Kalan, Sherpur, Sulargharat, Sunam, Sehna, Dirba, Malerkotla, Amargarh and Moonak. These are under the control of Sub Divisional Engineer, Telephones, Barnala, who functions under the administrative control of the Divisional engineer, Telephones, Patiala Division, Patiala. The total number of connections and extensions Provided by these exchanges, as on 31 March 1978, were 2,401 (main) and 90 (extensions). Besides, two public call offices, viz. Chhajli and Hadiaya, with parent exchanges at Sunam and Barnala respectively were opened in 1976.

Radios and Televisions. – These have become very popular in the district. As on 31 December 1978, as many as 54020 radio and 1,843 television licences were issued in the district. Besides, 528 radio-sets were installed in the district under the Community Listening Scheme upto November 1979. 

 

(h) Organisations of Owners and Employees in the Field of Transport and Communications

The transport owners and workers/employees of transport companies/departments do not have any registered organisation in the district, except the Rickshaw Workers Union, to promote their service interests and well being. Particulars of Union of Rickshaw Workers functioning in the district are as under:

 

Name of Union                                                               Date of registration

Rickshaw Workers Union, Barnala                                 3 February 1976

 

APPENDIX I

(Vide page 192)

Number of vehicles having valid registration in District Sangrur (As on 31 March)

 

 

Good Vehicles

Passenger Vehicles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four wheelers and above

 

 

 

 

 

 

Serial No.

Year

Four Wheelers & above Trucks & Lorries 

Three wheelers (including Tempos)

Buses

Cars & Station Wagons

Taxis

Jeeps

Three wheelers

Two Wheelers

Tractors

Trailors

Others

Total

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

1

1974-75

   544

2

150

136

96

7

1,310

263

1.710

203

4,421

2

1975-76

   611

2

162

173

98

7

1,530

594

1,969

203

5,349

3

1976-77

   658

2

175

239

111

7

1,870

1,130

2,397

203

6,792

4

1977-78

   690

2

184

279

158

10

2,179

1,967

2,397

230

11,256

5

1978-79

   778

10

201

313

5

178

10

2,610

4,524

2,397

230

11,256

6

1979-80

   873

14

224

372

6

189

12

3,198

6,405

2,397

242

13,932

7

1980-81

  1,011

103

240

430

10

199

3

4,058

8,802

2,423

141

17,420

(Source: State Transport Commissioner. Punjab)

 


Appendix ii

bus Routes Operated by the Pepsu Road Corporation, Sangrur Depot, as on 31 March 1978

Serial No.

Name of Route

Number of Daily Trips

Routs length (km)

Total Daily Service (km)

1

2

3

4

5

1

Barnala-Patiala

3

96

577

2

Patiala-Patran

2

58

232

3

Dhuri-Chandigarh

1

142

284

4

Ludhiana-Jind

1

203

406

5

Sunam-Mansa

2

46

184

6

Sangrur-Ahmedgarh

3

51

306

7

Sangrur-Ludhiana via Malerkotla

5

80

800

8

Sangrur-Jind

2

121

484

9

Sangrur-Patran

6

42

504

10

Barnala-Moga

9

67

1,206

11

Barnala-Himmatpura

4

32

256

12

Barnala-Baloke-Rampur

4

49

392

13

Barnala- Raikot

6

38

456

14

Ludhiana-Hissar

3

235

1,410

15

Sangrur-Patiala

4

56

448

16

Sangrur-Mansa via Barnala

1

85

170

17

Barnala-Gehlan

2

27

108

18

Sangrur-Raikot via Barnala

2

78

312

19

Barnala-Sangrur

2

40

160

20

Sangrur-Ludhiana via Jodha, Narangwal

6

93

1,116

21

Sangrur-Rampur Ganauta

2

106

424

22

Barnala-Baghapurana

1

62

124

23

Barnala-Raunta

2

56

224

24

Sangrur-Lehragaga

4

59

472

25

Sangrur-Sular

4

21

168

26

Samana-patran

1

26

52

27

Sangrur-Mansa via Sunam

1

67

134

28

Mansa-Rampura

1

51

102

29

Sunam-Khanauri (via Mahlan)

4

56

448

30

Sangrur-Moonak

2

75

300

31

Sangrur-Dhuri

4

16

128

32

Patiala-Lehragaga

2

112

448

33

Malerkotla-Bassi (Via Jaurepul)

1

78

156

34

Malerkotla-Chandigarh

2

121

484

35

Sangrur-Mansa (via Lehragaga)

4

117

936

36

Dhuri-Nabha

2

53

212

37

Raikot-Khana-Rupnagar

1

129

258

38

Barnala-Ahmedgarh (via Raikot)

2

62

248

39

Sangrur-Dhadrian

2

40

160

40

Sangrur-Jaurepul (via Bagarian)

2

59

236

41

Jaurepul-Khanna

2

30

120

42

Barnala-Sirhind

2

125

500

43

Malerkotla-Bassi

2

90

360

44

Sangrur-Sunam (via Upli)

4

18

144

45

Sangrur-Budhlada (via Dhanaula)

1

73

146

46

Sangrur-Budhlada (via Sunam)

2

62

248

47

Sangrur-Samana (via Bhawanigarh)

2

44

176

48

Sangrur-Chandigarh (via Chuni)

2

138

552

49

Sunam-Samana

2

50

200

50

Sangrur-Chandigarh

2

126

504

51

Sangrur-Ludhiana (non- stop) Does not enter city

2

73

292

52

Sangrur-Raikot via Malerkotla

2

70

280

53

Barnala-Moonak-Handa Kudni

2

114

456

54

Barnala-Sunam

2

39

156

55

Barnala-Mansa

6

51

612

56

Barnala- Sirsa

10

120

2,400

57

Mansa-Sirsa

28

69

3,864

58

Barnala-Jakhal

1

112

224

59

Sangrur-Delhi

1

257

514

60

Manda-Kalian

1

64

128

61

Sangrur-Samrala

2

96

380

62

Sangrur-Malaudh

2

59

236

63

Sangrur-Dhuri-Sherpur

4

34

272

64

Sangrur-Dhuri-Amargarh

6

44

528

65

Barnala-Dhuri

8

34

544

66

Ahmedgarh-Chandigarh

2

106

424

67

Sunam-Khanauri (via Khokhar or gobindgarh Khokhar

2

91

364

68

Sunam-Khanauri up to Arno

2

104

416

69

Malerkotla-Bathan

4

17

136

70

Malerkotla-Barnala

8

50

800

71

Malerkotla-Dhuri

2

16

64

72

Sangrur-Bhawanigarh

2

19

76

73

Barnala-Chadanwal Raikot

4

45

360

74

Sangrur-Sunam (via Mahlan)

2

21

84

75

Dhuri-Patiala (via Saron)

2

67

268

76

Barnala-Dhaner

2

42

168

77

Barnala-Ahmedgarh (via Hamiddi)

2

76

304

78

Barnala-Budhlada (via Bhikhi)

2

56

224

79

Barnala-Malerkotla (via Hamidi)

2

57

228

80

Patiala-Khilrian

2

1121/2

450

81

Dhuri-Samana

4

56

448

82

Sangrur-Barnala (via Kattu)

7

46

644

83

Malerkota-Chandigarh (via Samrala)

1

115

230

84

Sangrur-Sultanpur

1

189

378

85

Malerkotla-Ludhiana

1

48

96

86

Malerkotla-Khanna

3

51

306

87

Sangrur-Budhlada (via Jekhepal)

4

58

464

88

Sangrur-Dhuri(via Saron)

3

31

126

89

Barnala-Tapa

2

21

84

90

Barnala-Rureke

2

17

68

91

Sagrur-Samana (via dirba)

2

56

224

92

Sangrur-Samana (via Bhatiwali)

2

53

212

93

Sunam-Samana (via Dirba)

3

60

360

94

Sangrur-Gurdaspur

1

250

500

95

Sangrur-Nangal

1

196

392

96

Rampura-Chandigarh

1

219

438

97

Sangrur-Abohar-Ganganagar

1

240

480

98

Sangrur-Khanauri (via Jakhal)

3

109

654

99

Barnala-Moga (via Thikriwala)

1

67

134

100

Sunam-Bareta (via Dialpura)

2

50

200

101

Samana)Khilrian

2

86

344

102

Amritsar-Rohtak

1

409

818

103

Amritsar-Jind

1

351

702

104

Samana-Chika

4

23

184

105

Mansa-Sangha

3

58

348

106

Mansa-Jhanda

3

48

288

107

Ludhiana-Sherpur

1

68

136

108

Malerkotla (Kanganpur)

3

15

90

109

Barnala-Malerkotla (via Hathan

2

41

164

110

Sunam-Amritsar (via Barnala, Moga)

1

218

436

111

Sunam-Chandigarh

1

136

7

112

Sunam-Bathinda (via Heron)

2

114

456

113

Dialgarh-Chandigarh (via Longowal)

1

163

326

114

Moonak-Chandigarh

1

180

360

115

Malerkotla-Wagha Border (via Amritsar)

1

250

518

116

Barnala-Chandigarh (via Sherpur)

2

173

692

117

Sangrur-Akbar pur (via Nagra)

2

25

100

118

Sangrur-Akbarpur (via Sargheri)

2

25

100

119

Sunam-Lehra (via Pishor Bhaika)

2

32

128

120

Sangrur-Lehra (via Ubhawal)

2

67

268

121

Lehra-Bathinda (via Gidrani)

 

2

120

122

Sangrur-Raikot (via Kutba-Shahbazpur)

2

85

340

(Source: Depot Manager, Pepsu road Transport Corporation, Sangrur)

 

 

APPENDIX III

Bus Routes operated by Private Transport Companies in Sangrur District as on 31 March 1978

S. No.

Name of Transport Company

Name of Route

Number of daily trips

Route Length (km)

Total daily Service (km)

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

The Randhawa Transport Service (Regd.), Sangrur

Nabha-Malerkotla (via Sangrur)

1

73

146

Sangrur-Khilrian) via Lehra)

1

76

152

Sunam-Khilrian

1

72

144

Sunam-Samana (via Prem Singh Wala)

1

60

120

 

 

Samana-Bhawanigarh

1

23

46

Sangrur-Bhawanigarh (via Mahlan, Nagra)

1

36

72

2

The Pal Bus Service (Regd.), Sangrur

Dhuri-Nabha

2

53

212

Ludhiana-Sangrur

2

80

320

Longowal-Chheetanwala

1

57

114

Sangrur-Bareta

3

78

468

Sangrur-Lehra (via Cheema)

3

55

330

Sangrur-Barnala (via Pharwahi)

1

48

96

Dhuri-Dhanaula

2

45

180

Sangrur-Lehra (via Namol)

1

58

116

3

The Pal Transport Service (Regd.), Sangrur

Dhuri-Nabha

2

53

212

Sangrur-Akbarpur (via Sohian)

2

19

76

Sunam-Arno (via Dirba)

1

69

138

4

The Sardar Bus Service (Regd.), Sangrur

Sangrur-Samana (via Khanal Kamalpur)

2

54

216

Sangrur-Samana (via Dirba, Shafipur)

4

52

416

Sangrur-Bhawanigarh (via Mahlan Gharachon)

2

36

144

5

The Tochi Transport Company (Regd.), Sangrur

Sangrur-Khilrian (via Lehra)

1

76

152

Sunam-Samana (via Dirba)

1

60

120

Sangrur-Samana (via Sular Gharat)

2

54

216

6

The Rai Bus Service (Regd.), Sangrur

Nabha-Dhuri

Sangrur-Akbarpur

4

2

53

21

424

84

7

The Sangrur Progressive Workers Co-operative Transport Society, Ltd., Sangrur

Sangrur-Fatehgarh (via Dhadrian)

3

67

402

Sangrur-Longowal (via Duggan)

1

26

52

8

The Libra Bus Service Private Ltd.. Malerkotla

 Malerkotla-Bathinda (via Sunam)

2

158

633

Ludhiana to Bathinda (via Sunam)

2

206

824

Malerkotla-Bathinda (via Barnala)

2

140

560

Ludhiana-Bathinda (via Barnala)

1

180

360

Bathinda-Barnala

6

72

864

Malerkotla-Bassi

1

84

168

Ludhiana-Dirba

1

107

214

9

The Malwa Transport Company (P) Ltd., Barnala

Sangrur-Mansa

3

92

552

 

Barnala-Bathinda

3

72

432

Barnala-Mansa

1

51

102

Barnala-Gehlan

41/2

26

234

Barnala-Dhuri

1

34

68

10

Bhadaur Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Bathinda (via Bhadaur, Baja Khana)

1

96

192

11

The Indra Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Bathinda

2

72

288

Barnala-Sangrur (via Kattu)

2

40

160

12

Bhupindra Transport Service (Regd), Barnala

Barnala-Talwandi

1

841/2

169

13

Luxmi Bus Service (Regd.) Raikot H.O. Barnala

Barnala-Bhikhi

3

37

222

Barnala-Budhlada

3

57

342

Sangrur-Tanwandi Sabo

1

126

252

14

The Dhaliwal Bus Service (Regd.) Barnala

Ludhiana-Bathinda

1

153

306

15

The Sidhu Transport Service (Regd.) Barnala

Ludhiana-Bathinda

1

153

306

Barnala-Ludhiana (via Pakhowal)

3

80

480

Barnala-Bathinda

2

72

288

Barnala-Malerkotla

1

50

100

Barnala-Jagraon

3

60

360

16

The Deol Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Bathinda

2

72

288

17

The Walia Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Sangrur

3

41

246

Barnala-Sangrur (via Kattu)

1

40

80

Barnala-Sangrur (via Bathlan)

2

40

160

Barnala-Sunam (via Longowal

2

42

168

Barnala-Kahorian

2

58

232

Sangrur-Mansa-Talwandi

1

123

246

Barnala-Malerkotla

1

50

100

Barnala-Dhanaula

4

11

88

Barnala-Bhikhi

1

37

74

Barnala-Bhiki-Budhlada

2

57

228

18

The Hind Motors (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Khanna

2

104

432

Barnala-Bhadaur

1

28

56

Bhadaur-Sangrur

1

68

136

Barnala-Muktsar

2

84

336

Barnala-Dhuri

1

34

68

19

The Punjab Motors (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Mansa-Talwandi

2

841/2

33

20

The Karamagarh Transport Company (Regd.), Bhadaur

Bhadaur-Sangrur

2

68

272

Barnala-Bhadaur

2

28

112

Barnlala-Sangrur

1

41

82

Barnala-Rampur (via Bhadaur)

1

58

116

21

The Kamal Bus Service (Regd)., Sunam

Sunam-Budhlada

9

39

702

Sunam-Bareta

2

45

180

Budhlada-Patiala

1

100

200

22

The Amandeep Bus Service (Regd.), Sunam

Sunam-Barnala-Fatehgarh

2

65

260

Sunam-Barnala

2

42

168

Moonak-Mansa

2

93

372

Sunam-Satluj

2

22

88

23

The Dhuri Bus Service (Regd.), Dhuiri

Malerkotla-Barnala (Via Samire, Cheema Sherpur)

1

60

120

Barnala-dhuri (via Shekha)

1

34

68

Dhuri-Raikot (via Karor, Chhapar)

2

72

288

Dhuri-Raikot (via Kharoch, Chhapar)

6

63

756

Dhuri-Kutwa, Raikot

2

72

288

24

The Prem Co-operative Transport Society, Bhadaur

Barnala-Rampura (via Salabatpura)

2

59

236

Barnala-Bhadaur

2

28

112

Barnala-Jaito-Muktsar

3

112

672

Bhadaur-Rampura

3

40

240

Bhadaur-Nihal Singhwala

2

19

76

Barnala-Rampura (via New Road Sehna)

1

46

92

Rampura-Bhodipura

1

46

92

25

The Sunam Bus Service (Regd.), Sunam

Sunam-Barnala-Dirba (via Longowal)

2

63

252

Sunam-Barnala

2

42

168

26

The Akal Bus Service (Regd.), Ahmedgarh

Barnala-Ahmedgarh (via Malerkotla)

1

80

160

27

The Ahmedgarh Transport Company (Regd.), Ahmedgarh

Barnala-Ahmedgarh (via Malerkotla)

2

80

320

28

The Barnala Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Sangrur-Barnala

1

41

82

Barnala-Bathinda

3

72

432

Barnala-Jagraon (via Hathur)

3

64

384

29

The Bhupindra Transport Company (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Mansa

1

51

102

30

The Sandhu Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

 Barnala-Chak-Bhai-Ka-Raikot

3/4

46

69

31

The Satnam Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Sangrur-Bhadaur

1

18

56

32

The Ashoka Bus Service (Regd.), Bhadaur

Barnala-Bhadaur

1

28

56

 

Barnala-Jawahar Singhwala (via Chark)

4

48

384

Barnala-Moga (via Jawahar Singhwala Chark)

4

81

648

33

The Indian Bus Service (Regd.), Malerkotla

Barnala-Malerkotla (via Sangrur)

2

72

288

Nabha-Malerkotla (via Chaudhri Majra)

1

51

102

Bassi-Ahmedgarh (via payal)

21/2

78

390

Sirhind Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar (via Morinda)

3

48

288

Ahmedgarh-Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar 

½

81

405

Bassi-Malerkotla (via Sehora

21/2

81

405

Bassi-Malerkotla-Ahmedgarh

21/2

107

535

34

The Preet Bus Service (Regd.) Sunam

Ludhiana-Ahmedgarh-Bathinda (via Sunam)

2

206

824

Malerkotla-Bathinda (via Sunam)

2

158

632

Sunam-Bathinda

1

96

192

Sangrur-Ludhiana (via Malerkotla)

1

80

160

Sangrur-Khanauri (via Sunam, Moonak)

1

104

208

35

The Dhaliwal Roadways (Regd.), Bhawanigarh

Sangrur-Bhawanigarh (via Mahlan, Nagra, Charachon)

1

36

72

Sangrur-Patiala

1

56

112

Patiala-Sunam

1

66

132

Patiala-Ghurama

1

39

78

36

The Rekhii Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Bathinda

2

72

288

37

The Prem Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Bathinda (via Bhadaur)

1

96

192

38

The Gobind Bus Service  (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Bhikhi-Budhlada

2

57

228

Bharnala-Bhiki

1

37

74

Barnala–Bhikhi (via Hadiaya)

1

36

72

39

The Manjit Bus Service (Regd.), Bhadaru

 Bhadaur-Rampur (via Phul)

3

30

180

40

The Bhadaur Bus Service (Regd.), Barnala

Barnala-Bathinda (via Bhadaur)

 1

96

192

41

The Preet Roadways  (Regd.), Sunam

Patiala-Fatehgarh

1

90

180

42

The Bharat Motors (Regd.), Sunam

Barnala-Faridkot

1

90

180

43

The Fatehgarh Roadways (Regd.), Malerkotla

Bassi-Malerkotla (via Saraud, Daud)

1

84

168

Bassi-Malerkotla (via Jarg)

1

78

156

44

The Sangrur Bus Service Private Ltd., Sangrur

Nabha-Dhuri (via Bagrian)

1

53

106

(Source: Secretary, Regional Transport Authority, Patiala)

 

Contents        Next

 


 [P1]Punjab States Gazetteers, Vol. XVII-A, Phulkian States, 1904 Patiala, Jind and Nabha p. 296

 [P2]The first digit represents the zone, the second the sub-zone and the routing, the third digit pin points the routing district and the last three digits indicate the specific post office included in the that sorting district.