Education and Recreational and Medical  Facilities                       

            There are two teachers to teach the prisoners inside the jail . One teacher is paid by the Government and other is paid by the District Crime Prevention Society, Firozpur. Illiterate prisoners are given lessons in the jail to enable them to write their names, send letters home and read those received by them. The  are occasionally examined by  the Block Education Officer and are issued literacy certificates. Lectures on moral, social and religious subjects are also arranged for the prisoners.  There is a library in the jail and books are issued to them, so that they  may read them in their spare time. The District Public Relations Officer, Firozpur supplies from time to time instructional and informative pamphlets and other material for the benefit of the prisoners.

            The jail has a 16-mm projector and the prisoners are shown full-length pictures and news-reels every month. The jails has also a dramatic club. After one or two months, dramas are staged. Cinema shows are also arranged by the District Public Relations Officer, Firozpur. There is also provision for games, such as kabaddi and volley-ball for  the prisoners. Matches are held off and on in the jail. The Welfare Officer  of  the jail has been entrusted  with the job of arranging cultural  and recreational programmes for the prisoners inside the jail.

            There are two whole-time medical officers and two dispensers in the jail to look after the health of the prisoners. The prisoners, suffering from minor ailments, are treated as outdoor patients. Cases of serious nature are sent to the Civil Hospital for major surgical operations, when necessary. The population o the prison is regularly vaccinated against small-pox.

Centeen

            A canteen was started  in the jail in 1961 on co-operative basis, with the funds subscribed by the prioress. It meets the daily needs of the prisoners, such as sugar, biris, biscuits and articles of toilet. Articles are purchased directly from the dealers and are issued to the prisoners on a nominal profits. The prisoners are issued coupons of the value of the amount  they deposit with the jail authorities and they can get their daily requirements from the canteen at fixed hours. This system is very useful to the prisoners and it has done away with the profit which formerly went  to the contractor.

Panchayat  System

            In order to foster a sense of responsibility among the prisoners and give them scope for initiative, the panchayat system has been introduced into the Central Jail. the prisoners elect through votes the members of the panchayat and the members of the panchayat elect their sarpanch. The members inspect food articles, draw ration from the stores and supervise its cooking. They also manage the sanitation of the jail. Besides,  they bring the difficulties and grievances of the prisoners to the notice of  jail authorities. This system has created a sense of responsibility and trust among the prisoners, and has been of great value in maintaining discipline.

Jail  Industries

            The industries carried on in the Central Jail, Firozpur, are carpentry, the making of nivar, tape, ban, hemp, bamboo chicks, textiles, durries , druggets, oil, oil-cakes, tags and laces training in poultry, farming and tailoring. The average number of prisoners employed in these industries, total production and the gross profit during 1974 to 1980 are given in the following table :

 

Year                       Daily average of             Production                        Gross Profit

                                    prisoners                  (Rs)                                  (Rs)

                                    working in

                                    the factory

1974                         343.98               5,52,924                        55,292

1975                          381.57               6,23,849                        62,385

1976                          509.39                5,35,665                        53,567

1977                          512.92                6,39,691                        63,969

1978                              349.93                6,15,324                        61,532

1979                          261.96                6,11,536                          61,153

1980                          237.13             10,62,825                        1,06,222 

                                (Source : Superintendent, Centre Jail, Firozpur)

Official and Non-Official Visitors

The occasional visits by the officials and non-officials to the jail are very beneficial to the jail administration and also to the prisoners. They see the prisoners and listen to their request and complaints. They also see whether all the rules and regulations are being observed by the jail authorities. This is a useful institution as it provides  the prisoners with opportunities to approach the public to let them know what is happening behind the walls of the jails.

Sub-Jail, Fazilka :-             Formerly, a  judicial lock-up, managed by the Police Department, was converted into a sub-jail with effect from 12 December 1957. Situated on the Firozpur-Fazilka road, near the local courts, it is under the control of the Subdivisional Magistrate, who is its part-time Superintendent. he is assisted by the supervisory staff comprising an assistant superintendent, a head warder and 10 warders.

The total admissions to the sub-jail during 1976 to 1980 were 7,824. The average daily population was  47.33 and the maximum population on any one day was 172 during 1980. The number of convicted  prisoners, released on different rounds during 1976 to 1980 was 915.

A radio-set has been provided in the sub-jail for the re-creation of the prisoners. One daily newspaper is also provided for the prisoners. The prisoners, who need medical treatment, are sent to the Civil Hospital.

District Crime Prevention Society, Firozpur :-            formed in 1939, the District Crime Prevention Society, Firozpur, is doing commendable work for the welfare of the prisoners at the Central Jail, Firozpur. The prisoners are provided with reading and writing materials, such as copy-books, pencils, slates, and primers, out of the society’s funds. Cultural and recreational programmes are arranged for the prisoners inside the jail. A part-time teacher has also been provided by the Society for prisoners.

District Probation Officer, Firozpur :-             The Probation of Offenders Act, 1958, same into force in the Firozpur District in 1967, when a district probation officers was posted here. The District Probation  is under the control of the Chief Probation Officer, Chandigarh, who is under the overall administrative control of the Inspector-General of Prisoners, Punjab, Chandigarh.

The Probation of Offenders Act, 1958, was passed as a reformative measure for Judicial offenders (below 21 years) and for the first offenders, irrespective of their ages. To save such offenders from confinement within  the walls of the jails, the Act provides that such offenders be released on bail after entering into a bond with one surety for an amount considered sufficient and for a period up to three years, as desired by the court. The Act, however, does not cover such offenders who have  committed offences for which they can be  sentenced to death or life imprisonment.

            Whenever a juvenile or first offenders is brought before the court with  some charge for which the benefit of probation under the Probation of Offenders Act, 1958, can be given to the offenders and , as soon as the challan  is put up by the police, the court asks for pre-sentence report from  the District Probation Officer. In return, the District Probation Officer makes direct esquires without discrimination regarding the offender’s  character and antecedents, his social and environmental conditions, the  financial and other circumstances of his family, the circumstances in which the alleged offence was committed and any other fact which the court has  directed to inquire. Keeping in view the gravity of the crime and character of the offender, he is released with the condition to be kept under  supervision are plaeed under the supervision of the District Probation Officer. The latter, in return, performs multifarious duties  as a friend,  philosopher and guide to all the probationers kept under his supervision.  He looks into their personal problems and tries to solve them. He  chalks out  proper programmes and tries to improve the behaviour, attitude towards society, habits, character and morals of the probationers, so that they do  not revert to crime. He also holds meetings with the probationers in his  office and at their residences in order to watch the progress made by them .

            The Probation Officer makes enquiries about the character and behaviour of the probationers from respectable persons of the village, such as the sarpanch, members of the panchayats, and lambardars.

            The following table shows the number of prisoners released on probation on various grounds during 1973-74 to 1979-80 :

 

            Year                                   Under                     Without                 Social

                                           Supervision       supervision                  investigation

                                                                                                            reports.

1973-74                                    89                        215                                    2

1974-75                                    96                        171                                    1

1975-76                                    34                        853                                    2

1976-77                                    75                        504                                    4

1977-78                                    80                        529                                    6

1978-79                                    59                        426                                    2

1979-80                                  101                 101                              6

                                                           (Source : District Probation Officer, Firozpur)

(a)       Organization  of Civil  and Criminal Courts

Before the separation of the executive from the judiciary, the District Magistrate, in his capacity as head of the District criminal administration, was overall in charge of the magistrates and the police. Immediately  under him there was also an additional district magistrate who normally exercised Section 30 powers. Besides, there was one or more magistrates Ist class who disposed of the entire criminal work.

For the disposal of the civil work, there was a separate senior sub-ordinate judge and a number of subordinate judges who were  under the administrative control of the District and Sessions Judge, Firozpur.

Since the separation of the executive from the judiciary in the State from 2 October 1964, the administration of both civil and criminal justice in the District and Sessions Judge, Firozpur. T organization of the judiciary consists of the District and Sessions Judge and two additional district and sessions judges at the District headquarters. Under the superintendence of the District and Sessions Judge, there are tow administrative posts of a chief judicial magistrate and a senior subordinate judge, who work on the criminal and the civil side respectively, although both of them exercise civil and criminal powers. There are four judicial officers at the District headquarters and they deal  with  civil  and criminal cases entrusted to them by the Senior Subordinate Judge and the Chief Judicial Magistrate respectively. Similarly, at the tehsil  level, there are judicial officers who dispose of civil and criminal cases under the supervision and control of the District and Sessions Judge. The  civil cases are directly instituted in the courts  at the tehsil headquarters, whereas with respect to criminal cases, separate police stations are allotted to different judicial officers who deal with the cases of those police-stations.

Civil Justice :- On the civil side, the administration of Justice in the District is handled by the District and Sessions Judge, Firozpur, who is assisted by 2 additional district judges, 1 senior subordinate judge and 11 sub-judges-cum-judicial magistrates, (4 posted at Firozpur, 4 at Fazilka, 3 at Zira).

The civil courts try all sorts of cases of civil nature up to the powers with which each subordinate  Judge of the District judge has been invested. The Senior Subordinate Judge of the District and the subordinate judges are , sometimes , invested with additional magisterial powers temporarily.

 

Additional  District Judge, Firozpur

On the civil side, the Additional District and Sessions Judge is know as the Additional District Judge. He hears appeal against the judgements and decrees of subordinate judges of all classes and hears cases under the Land Acquisition Act, 1894, and Hindu Marriage Act, 1955.

Senior   Subordinate Judge, Firozpur

            The Senior Subordinate Judge has been invested with the powers of unlimited jurisdiction of civil nature  including rent cases, succession certificates, insolvency cases, guardian cases and appellate work up to a certain limit suits under the torts and suits under the Indian Contract Act, 1882.

Sub-Judges  First Class

The sub-judges are subordinate judges. They invested with the powers of unlimited jurisdiction of civil nature in their areas, including rent cases, succession certificates and others.

The following  statement shows the number of cases tried by civil courts in the District from  1976 to 1980 :

Year       Pending            Instituted      Total      Disposed of            Balance at

                from the            during the  for           during the             the close of

               previous            year                disposal     year                the year

1976   2,881          2,726                  5,607                  2,812                  2,795

1977   2,795          2,839                     5,634                     3,072                     2,562

1978  2,562          3,042                      5,604                     2,892                     2,712

1979  2,712          3,036                       5,748                      3,273                     2,475

1980  2,475             3,298                        5,773                      3,002                         2,771

                        (Source : Senior Subordinate Judge, Firozpur)

            Criminal  Justice :-            On the criminal side, the administration of justice in the District is handled by the District & Sessions Judge, Firozpur, who is assisted by 2 additional district and sessions judges and 11 chief judicial magistrate (4 posted at Firozpur, 4 at Fazilka and 3 at Zira).

            With the separation of the executive from the judiciary in the State from 2 October 1964, the powers of the District Magistrate, no the criminal side, are vested in the Chief  Judicial Magistrate, who is under the control of the District and Sessions Judge.

 

      The Chief Judicial Magistrate and the judicial magistrates deal with all types of cases relating to crime, except security cases. He is vested with the powers of a judicial magistrate, Ist class, i.e., with powers to try juvenile  offenders, to require delivery  of letters, telegrams, etc., to issue search  warrants for documents in the custody of postal or telegraph authorities, to release persons imprisoned for failing to give security under Section 106, to order police investigation into a cognizable offence, to entertain a case without complaints, to transfer cases to a subordinate magistrate, to report a case to High Court etc.

            All judicial magistrates try cases under the Indian Penal Code, 1860, the Punjab Excise Act, 1914; the Essential Commodities Act, 1955; and other special Acts relating to their police stations. They have the powers to direct warrants to land-holders, to issue search warrants for the discovery of persons wrongfully confined , record statements and confessions  during police investigation, to recover penalty on forfeited bonds, to order the released convicts to notify the residences, etc. All criminals apprehended by the police are produced before the judicial magistrate whose jurisdiction the criminals may have been apprehended or within whose jurisdiction the crime may have been committed.

            After investigation, the police put the challans in the courts of judicial magistrates who also act as ilaka magistrates and watch the investigation of criminal cases. The judicial magistrates have also been vested with the powers of sub-judges with varying jurisdiction.

            With he separation of the executive from the judiciary, the cases of security for keeping peace and security for good behaviour, under the Criminal Procedure Code, are tried by the subdivisonal magistrates, Firozpur, Zira and Fazilka, relating to their respective subdivisions. They are also called upon to perform executive functions, in addition to the trial of above types of cases.

The following statement shows the number of criminal cases decided by the criminal courts in the District during 1973 to 1980 :

                Year                              Cases decided

1973        16,770

                        1974                                              12,669

1975                                14,152                       

1976                                10,910       

 

                Year                              Cases decided

1977            10,713

                1978                              13,596

1979        21,384

            1980                                         20,740

                                ( Sources : Chief   Judicial Magistrate, Firozpur)

Gram/Panchayat  Courts

            Under the Punjab Gram Panchayat Act, 1952, certain civil , criminal and revenue powers are vested in the panchayats. Petty cases of various categories are disposed of by the bodies. This system has been put into use to  decentralize authority to strengthen the roots of democracy  and  lessen the burden of courts. The entrusting of judicial powers to the  panchayats has enhanced their prestige and added to their status. They are competent to grant bail to a person against a surety of not exceeding Rs. 500.

            The criminal  criminal jurisdiction of a gram panchayat is confined to the trail of offences specified in Schedule 1-A and 1-B of the Punjab Gram Panchat Act, 1952. The panchayats are also competent to take cognizance  su moto of cases falling under Sections 160, 228, 277 , 289, 290, 294 and  510 of the Indian Penal Code and under Sections 3 and 4 of the Punjab Jvenile Smoking Act, 1918 (or any other Act for the time being in force).

            With regard to the civil and revenue judicial functions, the panchayats are competent to try suits for the recovery of movable property or the value of such property; suits for money or goods due on contracts or price thereof; suits for compensation for wrongfully taking or damaging movable property; and suits mentioned in clauses (j), (k), (l) and 9n) of Sub-section (3) of Section 77 of the Punjab Tenancy Act, 1887 (or any other Act for the time being in force). The panchayat, when  trying such suits, is deemed to be a civil or  a criminal or a revenue courts, as the case may be.

            The following statement shows the judicial work done by the panachayat in the District during 1973-1974 to 1979-80 :

 

Judicial work done by panachayat in the Firozpur District from

1973-1974 to 1979-80

Judicial work done by Panchayats in the Firozpur District from

1973-74 to 1979-80

Revenue cases                        1973-74    1974-75    1975-76    1976-77   1977-78   1978-79   1979-80

 

1 Cases pending at the

   Beginning of                 186        180              122          66              68                44            16

   the year

 

2 Cases instituted          88            52                 40           20                11        24        14

 

3 Cases received by

   Transfer                       2            2                   ---         --                    ---        ---        ---

4 Cases transferred from

  Panchayats and cases

  Returned for presentation

  to courts and

Panchayats                    2         --                     ---         ---                   ---        ---        ---

5 Cases decided         94       112                     96         18                   35        52        13

(a) Cases                     21        11                         21           7                    28        26        ---

dismissed

(b) Cases                   59         86                    68          5                    ---                   ---         10

compounded

(c) Cases                   14         15                     7           6                      7           16       3

decreed

6 Cases pending at the end

   of  the year         180      122        66                68                    44            16        17

Criminal Cases

1 Cases pending at the

   Beginning of      183        154                  118        118                   55        38        34

  the year

2 Cases            197            97                   85                37                    18            19        60

instituted

3 Cases received by

   Ttransfer           7              2                     5                  ---                                  2          ---        ---

4        Cases transferred from

Panchayats for

Presentation to courts

And 2               2                   ----           ----                     ---        1          ----

Panchayats

5    Cases         231        133                   90               100                      37            22        77

 decided

(a) Cases          37           31                   18                  3                        12            4          ---

dismissed

(b) Cases         181         92                  62                   76                     24            14        65

compounded

(c) Cases          13        10                    10                  21                       1            4          9

convicted

6        Cases pending at the

end of            154         118                 18                 55                      38            34        17

the year

(Source: Director of Rural Development and Panchayats, Punjab.)

Bar  Associations

In order to promote and maintain a higher standard of professional conduct and to encourage and promote the study of scientific law, bar associations have been formed at all the district and at subdivisional headquarter in the State. These associations look after the interests of  their members and render a useful service to the cause of the legal profession. The bar associations endeavor to maintain the dignity of the profession, besides promoting the best  possible relations between the Bench and the Bar. These also help the courts in the administration of justice and promote a sense of respect for law and order in the public mind.

            The Bar Association, Firozpur, is one of the oldest associations in the State and is said to have been formed in 1865. Its present strength is 142. Its members took a prominent share in the political, social and cultural  life of the District and many of them have occupied high judicial positions.

            Bar Association, Zira, was formed in 1930 and its present strength is 42. The Bar Association, Fazilka, was formed  about the year 1930 and its present strength is 119.

 

CHAPTER  XIII

OTHER   DEPARTMENTS

            In recent times, the role of public administration has been increasingly expanding to meet the exigencies of planning for a welfare State. Before  Independence, Revenue, Judiciary and Police were the only important departments. The activities now undertaken by the Punjab Government are so diverse that a number of departments, which did not exist or play  any significant part in the past, have come up during the post-Independence  period to give effect to, and keep pace with, the growing tempo of development work generated by the various nation building activities implemented under each successive Five-Year-Plan.

            The administrative set-up, functions and activities of the departments, which have not been mentioned elsewhere in the Gazetteer, are dealt with in the following account :

(a)       Public  Works  Department

The activities of this Department may be mainly divided into drainage, public health, the construction of buildings and roads, and irrigation. The jurisdiction of the circles or divisions of the Department is not necessarily confined to one district. It may extend to more than one district. However, the circles or divisions, having jurisdiction over the Firozpur District, are described below :

(i)        Superintending Engineer, Drainage Construction Circle, Firozpur

Opened on 13 November 1967, the Drainage Construction Circle, Firozpur has under it three divisions, viz. the Mechanical Drainage Construction Division, Firozpur; the Drainage Construction Division, Firozpur and the Golewala Drainage Division, Firozpur, each under an executive engineer. Its jurisdiction also extends to the Ludhiana District and portions of the Bathinda and Faridkot districts.

         The Superintending Engineer is assisted by 1 circle head draftsman, 2 divisional head draftsmen, 2 draftsmen, 1 circle superintendent, 1 superindentdent grade IV , besides other ministerial class III and allied class IV staff.

The Circle is entrusted with the construction and maintenance of surface water drains, seepage drains and flood protection bunds.

Executive Engineer, Mechanical Drainage Construction Division, Firozpur :-            The Division was opened on 8 December 1967. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officers, 24 sectional officers, 1 divisional account, 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 head draftsman and 1 draftsman, besides other ministerial/technical class III  and class IV staff.

            The main function of the Division are to do all the mechanical jobs, including the work to be done by earth-moving machinery, dewatering for masonry works, etc. in the entire area under the jurisdiction of the Drainage Construction Circle, Firozpur,.

Executive Engineer, Drainage Construction Division, Firozpur :-  Opened on 5 April 1971, the Drainage Construction Division, Firozpur, is entrusted with the construction of drainage. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officers, 24 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 accountant, 1 head draftsman, 2 draftsmen, besides other ministerial/technical class III and class IV staff.

Executive Engineer, Golewala Drainage Division, Firozpur : Established in 1963, this Division is entrusted with the work of anti-waterlogging and flood control to save the standing crops and village abadis from             devastation. Besides, the schemes for linking local depressions of villages and towns with the main drains are being formulated to give relief to the inhabitants of the District from waterlogging menace and floods.

The executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officer, 21 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grad IV, 1 head draftsman, 1 divisional accountant, besides other ministerial/technical class III and miscellaneous class IV staff.

Executive Engineer, P.W.D. , Public Health Division, Firozpur:- Started  in 1956, the Division is under the administrative control of the Superintending Engineer, Public Health Circle (North), Jalandhar City. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officers, 1 head draftsman, 2 draftsman, 17 sectional officers, 2 tracers, besides other ministerial/technical class III and class IV staff.

The main functions of the Division are to execute and maintain the work of water-supply schemes and drainage schemes, and sanitary installation works in the buildings of the State Government. Besides, it has  been entrusted   with the work of brick-pitching and drainage of model  villages. The work of public-health amenities on behalf of the Central Government, the M.E.S. authorities and other departments is also executed and maintained as deposit works.

Executive Engineer, P.W.D. Public Health Division, Abohar :-   Started in 1971, the Division is under the administrative control of the Superintending Engineer, Public Health (Rural Water Supply Scheme), Muktsar. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officers, 1 head draftsmen, 2 draftsmen, 16 sectional officers, 2 tracers, besides other ministerial/technical class III and class IV staff.

The main functions of the division are to execute and maintain the work of the water-supply schemes in the villages.

(i)  Superintending  Engineer, Firozpur Circle, P.W.D., Buildings and Roads, Firozpur

Started on 18 May 1968, this Circle has three divisions under it, viz., the P.W.D., Provincial Division, Firozpur; the Construction Division P.W.D., Buildings and Roads Firozpur and Construction Division P.W.D Building & Roads, Fazilka, each under an executive engineer.

The Superintending Engineer is under the administrative control of the Chief Engineer P.W.D. B & R, Punjab, Patiala, He is assisted by 1 superintendent, 1 superintendent grade IV,  1 circle head draftsman, 2 assistant draftsmen, 2 tracers, besides ministerial/technical class III and miscellaneous class IV staff.

The main functions of this circle are to exercise control over the construction and maintenance of buildings and roads under its jurisdiction.

Executive Engineer, Provincial Division P.W.D. B & R, Firozpur

Formed in about 1953, the Division is entrusted  with the construction and maintenance of public buildings and roads in the District.

The Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 sub-divisional officers, 13 sectional officer, 1 superintendent grad IV, 1 divisional accountant, 3 accounts clerks, 1 divisional draftsman, 2 assistant draftsmen, and ministerial/technical class III and class IV staff.

              Executive Engineer, Construction  Division P.W.D. B & R, Firozpur

Started in September 1973, the Construction, P.W.D., B & R Firozpur, is entrusted with the construction of buildings and roads. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officers, 15 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grad IV., 1 divisional accountant, 1 head draftsman, 2 draftsmen, 2 tracers, besides ministerial/technical class III and class IV staff..

Executive Engineer, Construction  Division P.W.D. B & R, Fazilka

Established in July, 1973, the Construction Division, P.W.D., B & R, Fazilka, is entrusted with the construction of buildings and roads. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 sub-divisional officers, 12 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grad IV, 1 divisional accountant, 1 head draftsman, 2 draftsmen, 2 tracers, besides ministerial/technical class III and class IV staff.

 

(iv) Superintending Engineering, Firozpur Canal Circle, Firozpur.

Opened in 1924, this Circle has four divisions under it, viz.  the Executive Engineer, Eastern Division, Firozpur; the Executive Engineer, Harike Division, Firozpur; the Executive Engineer, Abohar Division, Abohar, and Rajasthan Feeder Division, Firozpur. The superintending  Engineer, Firozpur, is assisted by 4 executive engineers, 15 sub divisional officers, 2 deputy collectors, 1 superintendent, 5 head clerks, 21 ziladars, 1 circle head draftsman, 5 divisional head draftsmen, 6 draftsmen, and 60 sectional officers, besides ministerial staff/technical class III and allied and miscellaneous class IV staff.

The main functions of the Circle are the maintenance and rapairs of the Firozpur and Harike Headworks, the Eastern Canal System, the Firozpur Feeder System, the Sirhind Feeder, the Rajasthan Feeder and the Abohar Branch, and the preparation of the  demand statement of abiana. Abohar Branch, and the preparation of the demand statement of abiana.

Executive Engineer, Eastern Division, Firozpur :-  The Division was established in May 1946. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officers, 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 account, 1 head draftsman, 1 tracer, besides ministerial/technical class III and class IV staff.

It is a Headworks-cum-Revenue Division. The Hussaniwala Head is under its jurisdiction and all the works connected with it are maintained by the Sub-Divisional Officer, Headworks Sub-Division.  Besides, there are four subdivisions under its administrative control, two at Firozpur, one each at Jalalabad and Fazilka. Bunds for protection from floods in the area are also constructed by  this Division.

Executive Engineer, Harike Division, Firozupr :-  Started on 17 December 1948, the Harike Division has in its charge the Harike Head-works, the Sirhind Feeder and the Firozpur Feeder canals. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officers, 16 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grade IV, 3 ziladars, 1 accountant, 1 head draftsman, 1 draftsman, besides ministerial and technical class III and class IV staff.

The Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 sub-divisional officers, 1 deputy collector, 11 ziladars, 13 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 head revenue clerk, 1 divisional accountant, 1 divisional head draftsman, 1 draftsman, besides ministerial and technical class III and class IV staff.

             Executive, Rajasthan Feeder Division, Firozpur :- Established in 1964, the Rajasthan Feeder Division has in its charge the maintenance of the Rajasthan Feeder, which takes off from the Harike Headworks located in the Punjab area. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 sub-divisional officer, 16 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 accountant, 1 head draftsman, 1 draftsman, besides other ministerial and technical III and class IV staff.

(v)  Superintending Engineer, Canal-Lining Circle, Firozpur :-Started on 2 June 1980, this circle has tow divisions under it in the Firozpur District, viz. the Executive  Engineer, Canal-lining Division, Firozpur, and the Executive Engineer, Canal-Lining Division, Abohar.  Its jurisdiction also extends to the Faridkot District.

The Superintendent Engineer is assisted by 1 circle head draftsman, 2 draftsmen, 1 tracer, 1 superintendent grade II, 1 superintendent grade IV, besides some other class III and allied class IV staff.

The main function of Circle is brick-lining of the channels.

 

Executive Engineer, Canal-Lining Division, Firozpur : This division was opened  on 9 June 1980. the Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 sub-divisional officers, 12 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 divisional head draftsman, 1 draftsman, 1 assistant research officer, 3 research assistants, besides some other class III and class IV staff. The main function of the Division is the brick-lining of he channels.

Executive Engineer, Canal Lining Division, Abohar :- Opened on 12 July 1979, the Canal-Lining Divisional, Abohar, is entrusted with the work of brick-lining of the canals. The Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 sub divisional officer, 12 sectional officers, 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 divisional head draftsman, 1 draftsman, besides some other class III and class IV staff.

(b)  Public Relations Department

The Public Relations Department is represented at the district level by the District Public Relations Officer. This office was opened during the World War II under the name of ‘District National Home Front’ and its primary aim as to mobilize the masses for recruitment to the Army and to seek their general co-operation for war efforts. The work of maintaining communal harmony was also entrusted to it. After Independence, this office was named District Publicity Office and was entrusted with the work of publicizing  the policies and decisions of the popular government and that of motivating the people for active participation in the development schemes. The office got its present name of ‘District Public Relation Office’ on 1 February 1951.

The District Public Relations Officer, Firozpur, is assisted by 1 Assistant public relations officer, 2 tehsil publicity organizers (one each at Fazilka and Zira), 1 information centre assistant, 1 information centre attendant, 1 drama inspector, 1 drama attendant, 1 radio supervisor, 1 radio mechanic, 1 stage master, 1 harmonium master , 1 tabla master, 5 actors, and some other ministerial and technical class III and class IV staff. There is also the Additional District Public Relations Officer who posted at Fazilka.

The duties of the District Public Relations Officer are to publicize  the policies and decisions of the government through press and mass media of dramas and cinemas, also including press coverage, the  organization of  public meetings and rural conferences, holding kavi darbars (poetical symposia), variety programmes and exhibitions.  The District Public Relations Officer also received tourists from within the country and from outside. He is also the Secretary of the District Library Committee, which gives grants for the development of municipal libraries and for setting up reading-rooms is the rural areas.

The office also runs a Tourist Information Centre at the District Headquarters, the Centre is frequently visited  by foreign tourists, entering India through the Hussainiwala Border. Under the Community Listening Scheme, it has installed 352 radio-sets and 39 television-sets in the District.

© Co-operative Department

At the district level, the Department is represented by three Assistant registrar, viz. the Assistant Registrar, co-operative Societies, Firozpur; the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative societies, Fazilka, and the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative  Societies, Zira.  They are under the  administrative control  of the Deputy Registrar Co-operative Societies, Firozpur (office established in 1974) and under the overall control of the Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Punjab, Chandigarh.

The Office of the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Firozpur, was established in 1925. He is assisted by 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 statistical assistant, 25 inspectors, 24, sub-inspectors, besides some other ministerial and class IV staff. The Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Fazilka is assisted by 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 statistical assistant, 30 inspectors, and 29 sub-inspectors, besides some other ministerial staff and class IV staff. The Assistant Registrar Co-operative Societies, Zira is assisted by 1 superintendent grade IV, 1 statistical assistant, 15 inspectors, 16 sub-inspectors, besides other class III and class IV staff.

 

The main functions of the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Firozpur, Fazilka and Zira, are to ensure the proper growth and development of the co-operative movement; the registration of co-operative societies,  to exercise supervision over them and to ensure the audit of the accounts of these societies. They also advance loans to the members of the societies for stepping up agricultural production. Loans are also advanced in the form  of fertilizers, seeds and agricultural implements.

(d)   Food  and  Supplies  Department

The Department is represented in the District by the District Food and Supplies Controller, Firozpur. he is under the administrative control of the Director , Food and Supplies, Punjab, Chandigarh.

The Office of the District  Food and Supplies Controller, Firozpur was established in 1944. He is assisted by 3 district food and supplies officers, 10 assistant food and supplies officers, 1 senior auditor, 1 superintendent, 6 head analysts, 12 deputy analysts, 1 statistical assistant, 3 accountants, 23 junior auditors, 60 food and supplies inspectors and 91 sub-inspectors, besides some other class IV staff.

The main functions of the Department are : the procurement of foodgrains and the distribution of sugar, rice, wheat , atta and vegetable ghee through fair-price shops in urban as well as in rural areas, issue/the  renewal of brick-kilns and direwood licences, allotment of coal/coke and cement, the checking  of brick-kilns and cement depots, issuing  and checking of licences of foodgrains, rice hullers, rice-shellers,  kerosene, ghee, rice, sugar, yarn, etc. The Department also maintains its own goodowns for storing foodgrains.

 

(e)  Finance  Department

The Finance Department is represented in the District by the Treasury Officer, who is in the charge of the District Treasury, Firozpur. He is assisted by 4 assistant treasury officers (in charge off sub-treasuries at Abohar, Fazillka, Guru Har Sahai and Zira), 1 assistant superintendent, 1 sadar cashier (district treasurers), 6 assistant treasurers, 12 assistants besides some other ministerial and class IV  staff. Previously, the District Treasury was under the control of the Extra Assistant Commissioner (Revenue Department), who could not devote whole-time attention, being mainly concerned with magisterial work. The treasury work was, as such, in addition to his normal duties. Under the scheme of Reorganization of Treasuries, introduced in 1955 into the State, the treasuries were transferred to the Finance Department. Since then, the post of the Treasury Officer has been manned by the officers from the Punjab Finance and Accounts Service cadres.

        The main duties of the treasuries officer and the assistant treasury officers are to receive money and make payments on behalf of the Punjab Government and to maintain the initial accounts of the Government. They are also responsible to the Accountant-General, Punjab, for the regular submission of monthly accounts, allied returns, etc.

(f)  Planning Department

The Planning Department is represented at the District level by the District Statistical Officer, Firozpur. His office was established  in 1958. H is assisted by 3 technical assistants, 1 inspector, 1 statistical assistant, 14 field assistants, besides some other ministerial and class IV staff.

        The main functions of the District Statistical Office are to co-ordinate the statistical activities of various offices at the district level and to publish statistical data to improve the quality of the statistical work done at the district level, to conduct ad hoc socio-economic survey to collect price data for supplying to different Central and State agencies, to collect weekly retail prices, and to act as the store of statistics for government institutions and interested public.

(b)       Language  Department

The Language Department is represented at the district level by the District Language Officer, who is assisted by 1 instructor, besides some ministerial and class IV staff. The office came into existence in 1962.

The main functions of the District Language Officer are to popularize Punjabi in the District, to impart training in Punjabi shorthand and typewriting, to organize literary meetings, kavi darbars (poetical symposia) dramas, debates and poetic compositions, to celebrate birth and death anniversaries of renowned poets and writers of the District at their native places; to undertake the linguistic survey and to bring out glossaries, to give financial assistance to literary men and institutions or organizations and to assist the government office offices in translating pamphlets/books into

Soil  Conservation and Engineering Department

The soil Conservation and Engineering Department is represented in the District by the Divisional Soil Conservation Officer, Firozpur. His office was established in September, 1967. He is assisted by 3 Assistant soil conservation officers, 1 assistant accounts officer, 35 agricultural inspectors/soil conservation inspectors, 74 agricultural sub-inspectors, besides some other ministerial and class IV staff. There are three sub-divisions in the charge of this office, located at Firozpur, Fazilka and Zira, each headed by an assistant soil-conservation officer.

The main functions of the Department are the execution of land-improvement of the irrigation system by constructing pucca water-channels, the laying of underground irrigation system and installing the sprinkler irrigation system in the fields of the cultivator. it also undertaks the levelling of land, so that proper irrigation can be provided. The field work is got executed by the Assistant Soil Conservation Office.

 

 

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