The programme was started in Kharar Block of the Rupnagar District in 16964-65, which was covered by the end of 1968-69. In the Rupnagar Block, this programme was started in 1967-68 and ceased functioning by the end of 1971-72. In the Chamkaur Sahib and Anandpur Sahib blocks, this programme was started in 1969-70 and ceased functioning by the end of 1973-74. Besides, this programme was started in Nurpur Bedi Block in 1972-73 and ceased functioning by the end of 1976-77,

            The main objects of the programme are : to develop a programme of education and training in the applied nutrition programme and related subjects for establishing  as effective field service to improve local diets through production, preservation pre-school and school children; to promote through demonstration and education among the communities sound and hygienic  knowledge of production, preservation and consumption of protective programme for the selective groups of personnel in community development blocks.

            The activities of applied nutrition programme include functioning of Mahila samitis, youth clubs; setting up of farms- poultry, fisheries, horticulture' water are stocked supply of fingerlings, starting of gardens- school gardens, kitchen gardens community gardens' feeding of school/ pre-school children; feeding of expectant/ nursing mothers and to train persons in the programme.

(e) Sanitation

            In order to improve the environmental sanitation the environmental sanitation, the Government of India launched a National Water Supply and Sanitation programme in 1954. The Punjab State has been participating in the scheme since its inspection. This programme caters to the needs of rural as well as urban areas.  Under the programme, loans up to 100 per cent is given by the government to the municipal committees for their water-supply schemes.  Suitable grant is also given to deserving municipal committees. For Financing sewerage schemes, loan upto 75 per cent and grant upto 25 per cent are given to the local bodies.

            The main aims of the National Water  Supply Sanitation Programme are: to prevent spread of water-borne communicable disease, such as cholera, diarrhoea and typhoid; to check contamination of food, water and milk due to insanitary disposal of human excreta; to improve environmental sanitation by providing tapped water-supply and replacement of dry latrines with flush latrines; and to free sweepers engaged in sub-human system of collecting, transporting human excreta.

(i)         Public Health and Sanitation in Urban Areas. – The last rate or urbanization has not only let to the large scale unplanned and haphazard growth or urban sanitation in the State, but has also placed tremendous pressure on the available meagre civic services.  In most or the towns, basic services like water-supply and sewerage are either not available or are sub standard. The municipal committees attend to the sanitation of towns through pavements of the streets, construction of drains and arrangements for cleanliness of the towns and removal of town refuse. Besides, the Government has also been contemplating to improve the living conditions of urban dwellers. It has accordingly been decided to bring future development of urban areas within the control of the Government, especially with a view of putting an end to all haphazard growth.

            Under the Urban Development Schemes, the Government provides financial assistance in the form of loans and grants to the municipal committees for taking up various development schemes. Financial assistance is also given to the municipal committees under other schemes, viz. integrated City Development programme, the Revenue Earning Scheme, and the Civil Amenities Schemes. The Government also gives financial assistance in the form of loan and subsidy to various municipal committees for taking up water-supply and sewerage schems.

            However, to tackle the problem of water pollution, a 'Board for the prevention and Control of Water Pollution' has been set up in the State. Besides, the State Government has constituted a Water Supply and Sewerage Board in the urban sector.

            In the matter of civic and other amenities, Naya Nangal has an edge over all other towns of the district. It is a well planned town having a network of metalled roads and more than 2,000 houses depicting modern architecture' and housing persons from different corners of the country.  These houses have been constructed by a National Fertilizers Ltd. Nangal Unit ground sewerage and the supply of drinking water is through running water taps/ tubewells.

            Nangal Township is another important town of the district in respect of civic and other amenities. Underground sewerage exists in the new colonies while most of the old localities still have open surface drains. Night soil is generally carried on  head loads and wheel barrows in the old localities. Drinking water-supply is through tubewells and running water taps.

            For development of Rupnagar town, some major works, like construction of underground sewerage, are being taken up to improve the sanitation of the town. Drinking water-supply is based on canal water and water taps.

            Kharar, another town of the district has open surface drains and the night soil is generally disposed of on wheel borrows.  The supply of drinking water is through hand pumps, water taps and wells.

            The works of providing water-supply, sewerage and drainage in the urban estate, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar (Mohali), are being executed.

(ii)        Rural Sanitation and water supply- In the rural areas, sanitation work is looked after by the block development staff and primary health centres/ units. The main functions of the public health staff are to keep sanitation in the rural areas by removal of manure heaps, pavements of streets and lanes, construction of drains, improvement of wells, etc. The importance of providing safe, drinking water-supply is well-known. Insufficient and contaminated water for drinking purposes is undoubtedly one of the major causes of many diseases. It is, therefore, very important that safe potable drinking water is providing to the people in the rural areas. In order to ensure pure drinking water supply to villages, drinking water wells are constructed, old wells are renovated and hand pumps are installed.  In addition, pukka drains are constructed and vilalge lanes are paved. By people's participation, earth work is done on kachcha roads.  However, piped water-supply has also been made available to some of the villages in the district.

            For providing better living conditions in the villages and to accelerate the pace of developmental work in the rural areas, the model Village Scheme was started by the Government during 1969-70. It aims at the pavement of streets, construction of drains, arrangements with regard to the disposal of sullage water and construction of panchayat ghars.

            To commemorate the 25th Independence Anniversary of India, the Jayanti Village Scheme was also inaugurated in the State in 1972.  Under the scheme, one village in each block  has been selected as Jayanti village.  The selected villages are to be provided with minimum facilities such as drinking water-supply' improved houses for weaker sections; improvement of school building' electrification; roads, pavement of streets and construction of roads; civil and veterinary dispensaries; panchayat ghars, sports equipment and Harijan Dharmshalas. 


Appendix I

Deaths registered by causes in the Rupnagar District, 1974 to 1983

 

Causes of Death

 

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

1982

1983

Cholera

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Fevers

..

2,543

1,986

2,582

2,586

3,099

1979

1,625

1,105

1,135

-

Dysentery and Diarrhoea

..

91

12

71

125

39

53

91

45

22

-

Respiratory Diseases

..

559

427

1,376

1,264

1,030

983

796

610

1,177

1,125

Injuries

..

95

54

40

42

39

45

76

75

91

-

Other Causes

..

2,079

2,984

1,488

1,723

1,947

2,151

2,756

3,455

2,710

4.224

Total

..

5,367

5,463

5,557

5,570

6,154

5,211

5,343

5,290

5,135

5,359

 

                                                                                                                        (Source : Director , Health and Family Welfare Punjab, Chandigarh)

 


Appendix II

List of Hospital, Primary Health Centres and Subsidiary Health Centres/ Dispensaries in the Rupnagar District, as on

Sr. No.

Name of Institution and Location

No. of Beds

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

 

 

Male

Female

 

 

 

Hospital

1

Bhai Jaitaji Civil Hospital, Anandpur Sahib

..

15

10

Urban

State Public

Anandpur Sahib

2

Civil Hospital, Rupnagar

..

56

44

Rural

Do

Rupnagar

3

Civil Hospital, Kharar

..

15

10

Do

Do

Kharar

4

Canal Hospital, Nangal Town Ship

..

56

44

Do

State Special

Anandpur Sahib

5

Rural Hospital, Bharatgarh

..

15

15

Rural

State Public

Rupnagar

6

Rural Hospital, Morinda

..

15

10

Urban

Do

Do

7

Rural Hospital, Chamkaur Sahib

..

15

15

Rural

Do

Do

8

Rural Hospital, Bhallan

..

15

10

Do

Do

Anandpur Sahib

9

Rural Hospital, Nurpur Bedi

..

--

--

Do

Do

Do

10

Rural Hospital, Kurali

..

15

10

Urban

Do

Kharar

Primary Health Centres

 

 

 

 

 

11

Primary Health Centres, Bharatgarh

..

--

--

Rural

State Public

Rupnagar

12

Primary Health Centres, Camkaur Sahib

..

..

..

Do

Do

Do

13

Primary Health Centres, Kiratpur Sahib

..

4

4

Do

Do

Anandpur Sahib

14

Primary Health Centres, Nurpur Bedi

..

--

--

Do

Do

Do

15

Primary Health Centres, S.A.S. Nagar (Mohali) Phase- III-B-II

..

4

4

Do

Do

Kharar

16

Primary Health Centres Gharuan

..

4

4

Urban

Do

Kharar

17

Primary Health Centres, Boothgarh

..

4

4

Do

Do

Do

Subsidiary Health Centres/ Dispensaries 

 

 

 

 

 

18

Urban Slum Area Dispensary, Rupnagar

..

2

2

Urban

Do

Rupnagar

19

T.B. Centre, Rupnagar

..

..

..

Do

Do

Do


Sr. No.

Name of Institution and Location

No. of Beds

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

 

 

 

Male

Female

 

 

 

 

20

Civil Dispensary Phase-II, Sector-54, S.A.S. Nagar (Mohali)

..

2

2

Do

Do

Kharar 

 

21

Civil Dispensary Phase-I, Sector-54, S.A.S. Nagar (Mohali)

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

22

Civil Dispensary Phase-VI, Sector-54, S.A.S. Nagar (Mohali)

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

23

Urban Slum Area Dispensary, Rupnagar

..

2

2

Do

Do

Anandpur Sahib 

 

24

First Aid Post, Raj Nagar Nangal Town Ship

..

..

..

Do

State Special

Do

 

25

Police Line Dispensary, Rupnagar

..

3

3

Do

Do

Rupnagar

 

26

E.S.I. Dispensary, Khara

..

..

..

Do

Do

Kharar

 

27

E.S.I. Dispensary, Phase-III, S.A.S. Nagar (Mohali)

..

..

..

Do

Do

Do

 

28

E.S.I. Dispensary, Phase-II, S.A.S Nagar (Mohali)

..

--

--

Urban

State Special

Kharar

 

29

Z.P. Dispensary, Purkhali

..

2

2

Rural

Zial  'arishad

Rupnagar

 

30

B.M.B. Dispensary, Kotla Power House

..

--

--

Do

State Special

Anandpur Sahib

 

31

B.M.B. Dispensary, Ganguwal Power House

..

--

--

Do

Do

Do

 

32

Civil Dispensary, Kuarli

..

2

2

Urban

Sate Public

Kharar

 

33

Subsidiary Health Centre, Behrampur Zimindari

..

2

2

Rural

Do

Rupnagar

 

34

Subsidiary Health Centre, Ghanauli

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

35

Subsidiary Health Centre, Laudhair Majra

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

36

Subsidiary Health Centre, Mainpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

Sr. No.

Name of Institution and Location

No. of Beds

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

 

 

 

Male

Female

 

 

 

 

37

Subsidiary Health Centre,Singh

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

38

Subsidiary Health Centre, Nangal Sarsa

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

39

Subsidiary Health Centre, Bal Sondha

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

40

Subsidiary Health Centre, Tajpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

41

Subsidiary Health Centre, Amrali

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

42

Subsidiary Health Centre, Dhanola

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

43

Subsidiary Health Centre, Badwali

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

44

Subsidiary Health Centre, Dumna

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

45

Subsidiary Health Centre, Bazidpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

46

Subsidiary Health Centre, Bur Majra

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

47

Subsidiary Health Centre, Hafizabad

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

48

Subsidiary Health Centre, Khant Manpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

49

Subsidiary Health Centre, Rattangarh

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

50

Subsidiary Health Centre, Sotal Baba

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

51

Subsidiary Health Centre, Surtapur Farm

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

52

Subsidiary Health Centre, Ajauli

..

2

2

Do

Do

Anandpur Sahib

 

53

Subsidiary Health Centre, Barahmpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

54

Subsidiary Health Centre, Dher

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

55

Subsidiary Health Centre, Daroli

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

56

Subsidiary Health Centre, Gajpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

57

Subsidiary Health Centre, Kulgraon

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

58

Subsidiary Health Centre, Paharpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

59

Subsidiary Health Centre, Sahjowal

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

60

Subsidiary Health Centre, Kathura

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

61

Subsidiary Health Centre, Chandpur Sehri

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

Sr. No.

Name of Institution and Location

No. of Beds

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

 

 

 

Male

Female

 

 

 

 

62

Subsidiary Health Centre, Jhandian at Takhatgarh

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

63

Subsidiary Health Centre, Khara Kalmot

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

64

Subsidiary Health Centre, Chanoli

..

2

2

Rural

State Public

Anandpur Sahib

 

65

Subsidiary Health Centre, Jhaj

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

66

Subsidiary Health Centre, Lalpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

67

Subsidiary Health Centre, Nurpur Khurd

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

68

Subsidiary Health Centre, Sarthali

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

69

Subsidiary Health Centre, Thana

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

70

Subsidiary Health Centre, Tibba Tapperian

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

71

Subsidiary Health Centre, Bhago Majra

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

72

Subsidiary Health Centre, Bakkrapur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

73

Subsidiary Health Centre, Brahman Bassian

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

74

Subsidiary Health Centre, Daulat Singhwala

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

75

Subsidiary Health Centre, Landran

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

76

Subsidiary Health Centre, Dao Majra

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

77

Subsidiary Health Centre, Majat

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

78

Subsidiary Health Centre, Manauli

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

79

Subsidiary Health Centre, Nawangraon

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

80

Subsidiary Health Centre, Sohana

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

81

Subsidiary Health Centre, Tangauri

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

82

Subsidiary Health Centre, Chandon

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

83

Subsidiary Health Centre, Daon

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

 

 

Sr. No.

Name of Institution and Location

No. of Beds

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

 

 

Male

Female

 

 

 

84

Subsidiary Health Centre, Batta

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

85

Subsidiary Health Centre, Mulanpur Garib Dass

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

86

Subsidiary Health Centre, Sukrullapur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

87

Subsidiary Health Centre, Garangon

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

88

Subsidiary Health Centre, Badali

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

89

Subsidiary Health Centre, Jhanjheri

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

90

Subsidiary Health Centre, Chadiala

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

91

Subsidiary Health Centre, Mataur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

92

Subsidiary Health Centre, Saneta

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

93

Subsidiary Health Centre, Kanauran

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

94

Subsidiary Health Centre, Kanauran

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

95

Subsidiary Health Centre, Chatauli

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

96

Subsidiary Health Centre, Kuba Heri

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

97

Subsidiary Health Centre, Palheri

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

98

Subsidiary Health Centre, Mundon Sangtian

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

99

Subsidiary Health Centre, Behlolpur

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

100

Subsidiary Health Centre, Parol

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

101

Subsidiary Health Centre, Padiala

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

102

Subsidiary Health Centre, Sialba

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

103

Subsidiary Health Centre, Baraudi

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

104

Subsidiary Health Centre, Singhpura

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

105

Subsidiary Health Centre, Togan

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

106

Subsidiary Health Centre, Trarpur Majri

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

107

Subsidiary Health Centre, Khizrabad

..

2

2

Do

Do

Do

(Directory of Medical Institutions in Punjab State as on 01-04-83 issued by the Directorate of health and Family Welfare, Punjab, Chandigarh, pp.44-47)      

APPENDIX – III

 Family Welfare Centres in the Rupnagar District, as on 1.4.1983

SN

Name of Institution and Location

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

1.

Family welfare Centre, Civil Hospital, Rupnagar.

Urban

Government

Rupnagar

2.

Family welfare Centre, Chamkaur Sahib

Rural

Do

Do

3.

Family welfare Centre, Bhartgarh

Do

Do

Do

4.

Family welfare Centre, Kiratpur Sahib

Do

Do

Anandpur Sahib

5.

Family welfare Centre, Nurpur Bedi

Do

Do

Do

6.

Family welfare Centre, Civil Hospital, Kharar

Do

Do

Kharar

7.

Family welfare Centre, Boothgarh

Do

Do

Do

 

(Directory of Medical Institutions in Punjab State, as on 1.4.83 issued by the Director of Health and Family Welfare, Punjab Chandigarh, P 74)

 

APPENDIX – IV

 Maternity and Child Health Centres in the Rupnagar District, as on 1.4.1983

 

SN

Name of Institution and Location

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

1.

Rupnagar.

Urban

Municipal

Rupnagar

2.

Nangal Township

Do

State Special

Anandpur Sahib

3.

Kurali

Do

Vol. Org.

Kharar

4.

Bhago Majra

Rural

Do

Rupnagar

5.

Mahtotan

Do

Do

Do

6.

Morinda

Urban

Do

Do

7.

Chandpur Bela

Rural

Do

Anandpur Sahib

 

(Directory of Medical Institutions in Punjab State, as on 1.4.83 issued by the Director of Health and Family Welfare, Punjab Chandigarh, p.80)


APPENDIX – V

 List of Ayurvedic/ Unani in the Rupnagar District, as on 1.4.1983

Serial No.

Name of Dispensary / Hospital

Ayurvedic/ Unani

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

1.

Haripur

Ayurvedic

Rural

Government

Rupnagar

2.

Bindrakh

Do

Do

Do

Do

3.

Bhatha Sahib

Do

Urban

Do

Do

4.

Ban Majra

Do

Rural

Do

Kharar

5.

Rupnagar

Do

Urban

Do

Rupnagar

6.

Dera Santgarh

Do

Urban

Do

Anandpur Sahib

7.

Bhanupli

Do

Rural

Do

Do

8.

Massewal

Do

Do

Do

Do

9.

Bunga Sahib

Do

Do

Do

Do

10.

Kharar

Do

Urban

Do

Kharar

11.

Rani Majra

Do

Rural

Do

Do

12.

Majri Mayanti

Do

Do

Do

Do

13.

Mullanpur (Garibdass)

Do

Do

Do

Do

14.

Kumbra

Do

Do

Do

Do

15.

Jhanjeri

Do

Do

Do

Do

16.

Chuni Kalan

Do

Do

Do

Do

17.

Mohali

Do

Urban

Do

Do

 


Serial No.

Name of Dispensary / Hospital

Ayurvedic/ Unani

Rural/ Urban

Type of Management

Tahsil

18.

Nangal Township

Ayurvedic

Urban

Government

Anandpur Sahib

19.

Bhangal

Do

Rural

Do

Do

20.

Bhallan

Do

Do

Do

Do

21

Bajoor

Do

Do

Do

Do

22

Kalwan

Do

Do

Do

Do

23.

Tibba Nangal

Unani

Do

Do

Do

24.

Mirzapur

Ayurvedic

Do

Do

Kharar

25.

Chattauli

Do

Do

Do

Do

26.

Khijraban

Unani

Do

Do

Do

27.

Majri (Sialba)

Ayurvedic

Do

Do

Do

28.

Rolumajra

Do

Do

Do

Rupnagar

29.

Chamkaur Sahib

Do

Do

Do

Do

30

Behrampur Bet

Do

Do

Do

Do

31

Fatehpur Bet

Do

Do

Do

Do

32

Bamnara

Do

Do

Do

Do

33

Bhabaur Sahib

Do

Do

Do

Anandpur Sahib

34.

Talwara

Do

Do

Do

Do

 

(Source : Director, Ayurvedic, Punjab, Chandiarh)


CHAPTER XVII

OTHER SOCIAL SERVICE

 

Social service comprises education, health, housing, labour welfare, rehabilitation of the displaced, handicapped and mentally deranged or retarded person. The uplift of the Scheduled Castes and Backward Classes, though essentially within the purview of the Social Welfare Department, has been envisaged in the Indian Constitution for its effective implementation.  It is obligatory on the part of a Welfare State to promote the general well- being of the community. With  the  adoption of the single family system, a new problem to look  after the aged, destitutes and orphans has emerged. In a Welfare State, all are to be assured of adequate help in case of need that might occur due to old age, illness physically or mentally handicap or unemployment. State assistance is rendered as an obligation and not as charity.

            The implementation of welfare service is the joint responsibility of State Government and the voluntary welfare agencies.  The responsibility for implementation of the Scheduled Castes and   Scheduled Tribes programmes is vested  with the Central and State Governments. The voluntary social welfare organizations deal mainly with non-statutory services of general social welfare for women, children, and handicapped and other vulnerable groups.   Thus, these organizations share a major responsibility in the implementation of social welfare policies.

                                                (a) Labour Welfare   

            Labour welfare includes all measures that contribute to the improvement of working conditions, health, safety, hygiene, social security, general well- being and productive efficiency of the workers.  It includes such services, facilities and amenities, as may be provided in or in the vicinity of undertaking to enable the labour force to perform their duty in a healthy and congenial atmosphere instrumental in increasing the efficiency. The welfare also includes provision of canteens and cafeteria sanitary and recreational facilities, and provision of rest- rooms. Besides, it entails arrangement for transportation to and from work, provision of residential accommodation, creches, nurseries, primary and high schools, etc. for the children of the workers.

            Punjab is the first State in the country to have set up a safety council, called,  the Punjab Industrial Safety Council in May 1969, on the pattern of the National Safety Council . It is a non- government and non- political organisation. Factory owners and the association of workers, Government departments and all other persons, who are interested in the safety measures can become members of this council which is to advise, organize, encourage and promote  methods and procedures for assuring safety and health of the industrial  workers.

            Labour Legislation:-With a view to ameliorating the conditions of the working class safeguarding their interests, a number of legislative measures  have been taken. Various Acts have been enacted which concern the employment and non-employment wages, working, conditions, industrial relations, social security and labour welfare of persons employed in industry.

            Labour legislation means legal enactments and measures based on judicial principles. It is an off- shoot of the concept of social justice. Therefore, the nature of Labour legislation reflects the social, economic and political ideas current at a given time. Labour Courts and Industrial Tribunals have a different approach to the settlement of disputes.  They collect facts from the disputants and other sources with the purpose of forming an opinion, as to what compulsory solution or award would be just. The tribunal may modify existing contacts and create new provisions. The philosophy behind the labour laws is to administer justice, not only by interpreting existing law but also by creating new laws in the light of public policy and existing social environments. Labour legislation is that paramount effort to the community, which has granted a real equality to workmen. It is an expression of the feelings of the people, which gives practical shape to current human social values prevalent in the community.

            The labour laws generally follow the principles prescribed by the conventions of the International Labour Organisation which have been accepted by India. Under the constitution of India, the enactment as well as the administration of labour laws is the responsibility of both the Central and State Governments.

            The various Central and State Labour in force in the district are the Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1923; the Trade Union Act, 1926; the payment of Wages Act, 1936: the Employment of Children Act, 1938; the Industrial Employment (Standing Orders) Act, 1946; the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947; the Factories Act, 1948; the Working Journalists’ (Condition of Service and Miscellaneous Provisions) Act, 1955; the working Journalists’ (Fixation of Rates of Wages) Act, 1956; the Punjab Industrial Housing Act, 1956; the Punjab Shops and Commercial Establishments Act, 1958; the Motor Transport Workers Act, 1961; the Maternity Benefit Act, 1961; the payment of Bonus Act, 1965; the Punjab Industrial Establishment (National and Festival Holidays, Casual and Sick Leave) Act, 1965;  the Contractors Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act, 1970; the Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972; and the Fair Wage Clause and East Punjab Public Works Department Contractors Labour Regulations.

            The above mentioned labour enactment contain various welfare measure for the labour and inter alia, provide for regulation of conditions and hours of work, rest intervals, leave with wages, national and festival holidays, casual and sick leave, overtime payment, safety from accidents, health and sanitation, prohibition of employment of children below certain age and of women at night, regular payment of wages, payment of minimum wages, payment minimum bonus, payment  of collective bargaining certification of stainging  orders by employers for clearly defining the service conditions of workers, redressal of grievances, settlement of industrial disputes, etc.

            Before Independence, there was no separate organization in the State to look after the interests labour and other workers and to deal with their day-to-day problems. In 1949, a separate labour department was set up under the charge of a Labour Commissioner. The primary functions of the States Labour Department are to maintain peaceful industrial relations in the State and also to further the labour welfare measures, both statutory and non-statutory. Subject to certain limitations, it ensures that the working conditions for labour conform to a certain minimum level of safety and comfort; that the wages are adequately and regularly paid; and that injuries sustained during the performance of duties are properly treated and suitably compensated. The department also seeks to provide for medical care and model living for as many labourers and their dependents as possible. The prevention of industrial disputes and their settlement, as and when these arise, form the main function of the department.

            In order to secure proper benefits under the labour enactments, an adequate enforcement machinery functions under the Labour Commissioner, Punjab, Chandigarh. The Labour-cum-Conciliation Officer, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar, represents the Labour Department in the Rupnagar District. He is assisted by 1 Labour Inspector Grade I and I Labour Inspector Grade II posted at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar, and I Labour Inspector Grade II at Rupnagar. The Factories Act, 1948, is enforced in the district by the Factory Inspector, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar. The Labour-cum-Conciliation Officer, deals with the administration and disputes under the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947. He intervenes in industrial disputes on receipt of demand notices by the workers and employers. Under the law, he can also intervene if there is an apprehension of occurrence of industrial dispute. He maintains liaison with the workers and resolves the difference, which might take a serious turn. In case he fails to settle disputes, the matter is referred through Government to the Labour Court, Patiala, or the Industrial Tribunal, Punjab, Chandigarh. Appointed under section 7-A of the Industrial Disputes Act 1947, the Industrial Tribunal, Punjab, plays an important role in redressing the grievances of the industrial workers in the State.

            The salient features of the Central and State Labour Acts in force in the district are given below:

            Central Legislation: - The Factories Act, 1948, provides for health measures, safety from accidents, canteens, shelters, rest rooms, working hours, intervals for rest, leave with wages, etc. The Industrial Disputes Act, 1947, is a comprehensive measure adopted by the Government with a view to improving the industrial relation between the employers and the workers. It prohibits strikes and lock-out during the tendency of conciliation and adjudication proceedings. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936, regulates the payment of wages to the workers employed in establishment covered under the Act. The inspectorate staff are required to deal with complaints regarding non-or less or delayed payments of wages. The Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1923, provides for compensation to the workers who suffers temporary or permanent disablement or who die./ Under the Act, Compensation  is payable by the employer in case of injury caused by accident arising out of and in the course of employment. The compensation is available not only for accidents but lead fumes. Phosphorus mercury, etc. The amount of compensation payable depends upon the nature of injury and the average monthly wages of the worker concerned. The Indian Trade Union Act, 1926, gives a legal and corporate status to the registered trade unions. It also gives immunity from civil and criminal liability to trade union executives and members for bonafide trade union activities. The Industrial Employment (Standing Orders) Act, 1946, requires the employers, employing 100 or more employees to define with sufficient precision the conditions of employment and to make the said conditions known to the workman employed by them. The Motor Transport Workers Act, 1961, marks to regulate and ameliorate the conditions of workers in the transport undertaking five or more workers.

            The payment Bonus Act, 1965 contains provisions regarding the payment of bonus to the employees by the employer from his share of profits. The Employment of Children below the age of 15 years in certain risky and unhealthy occupations.  The Employee's State Insurance Act, 1948, provides compulsory and contributory health fund Act, 1952, seeks to make a provision for the future of the industrial worker after he retires or for his dependents in the case of his early death. The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961, provides for the payment of maternity benefit to women workers for a period of 12 weeks. The payment of gratuity Act 1972, provides for a scheme for the payment of gratuity to employees engaged in factories, mines, ports, oilfields, plantations, railways, companies, shops and other establishments, and in the matter connected therewith or incidental thereto. For the administration of this Act, the Labour-cum-Conciliation Officers are the Controlling authority.

 

 

State Legislation: -

            The Punjab Shops and Commercial Establishment Act, 1958, regulates the working conditions, hours of work, rest interval and weekly rest as also holidays, leave and overtime of workers employed in the shops and commercial establishments. The Act also provides for opening and closing hours of establishments and entitling the employee to go to courts to get their grievances redressed.  The Punjab Labour Welfare Funds Act, 1956, provides for setting up of a Labour Welfare Board and appointment of a Welfare Commissioner. The unclaimed wages of the employees and accumulation of fines have to be credited to the Labour Welfare Fund, out of which the Board is to finance various labour welfare activities sponsored by the Board. A Labour Welfare Board is already functioning in the State.  The Labour Commissioner under the Act.  The Punjab Industrial Establishments (National and Festival Holidays, Casual and Sick Leave) Act, 1965, provides for the grant of 7 days casual leave on full wages and 14 days sick leave at half wages to all the employees covered under the Act.

            In order to secure proper benefits under the labour enactment's machinery works under the Labour Commissioner, Punjab, Chandigarh. He is assisted at the district level by a Labour –Cum- Conciliation Officer, Factory Inspectors, Labour Inspectors and other miscellaneous staff.

            Industrial Relations-  Industrial relations between employees and employers are governed by the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947. The object of this Act is to maintain industrial harmony by proper adjustment of relations between the labour class and the capitalist class.  The industrial relation machinery set up under the Act is of two types; one for the prevention of disputes by providing works committees within the industrial units, and the other for the industrial relations machinery outside the industry comprising conciliation officers, boards of conciliation, courts of inquiry, labour courts, industrial tribunals and national tribunals.

            Normally relations of the employers and employees in the district have been peaceful, but these sometimes become strained thereby resulting in strikes/lock-outs. During the last seven years, there were only four strikes in the factories, viz. Punjab Tractors Limited, all located at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Electro Opticals Limited, all located at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar.

            The following table gives particulars regarding the industrial disputes in the Rupnagar District under the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947, from 1976-77 to 1982-83:-

Year

Number of disputes raised

Number of Strikes

Number of lock-outs

1976-77

83

-

-

1977-78

72

2

-

1978-79

74

-

-

1979-80

97

-

-

1981-82

128

1

-

1982-83

129

1

1

(Source : Labour-Cum-Conciliation Officer, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar)

           

The Factories Act, 1948- The factories Act, 1948 introduced comprehensive measures aiming at labour welfare and improvement of industrial efficiency. It was enforced in the State in April 1948. The Act was amended in 1954 to remove certain practical difficulties in calculation of leave with wages  and to bring provisions relating to employment of women and young persons in factories during night. The Act covers all industrial establishments employing 10 or more workers, where power is used or 20 or more workers, where power is not used. Under the Act, the factory owner is required to send a written notice containing full details regarding the factory to the Chief Inspector of Factories. The Act prescribes certain provisions regarding cleanliness, lighting, ventilation, sanitation, safety measures, prevention of over crowding, precautionary measures against fire, dangerous fumes, explosive or in flammable dust, etc. It also provides for elimination of dust and fumes, control of temperature, supply of cold drinking water, protection of eyes, etc. The welfare provisions included in the Act provides adequate canteen facilities, creches and shelter or rest rooms.  The Act also lays down that lays down that every factory employing 1,000 or more workers shall engage a qualified Safety Officer and every factory employing 500 or more workers will appoint a qualified Labour Welfare Officer. The inspectorate staffs are required to carry out a minimum number of inspections every month.  In case of default, the management is warned and asked to provide the required facilities to the workers and if the violations continue, prosecutions are launched.

            In 1982, the number of working factories registered under the Act in the district was 236 and workers employed in these factories during the year was 14,156. To look after the general welfare of the employees, Labour Welfare Officers been employed by M/s Panipat Woollen Mills, both at Kharar, and M/s Punjab Tractors Ltd., and M/s PunjabAnand Batteries Ltd., both located at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar.

            Employees' Provident Fund Scheme- This scheme came into force in its entirely from 1 November 1952.  Compulsory Provident Fund has been introduced in certain specified industrial establishment under the Employees' Provident Funds and Family Pension Funds Act, 1952. Every employee of an establishment, to which the Employees' provident fund scheme applies, is eligible for membership of fund after completion of 6 months continuous service or 120 days of actual work, whichever is earlier. Contribution at the rate of 6 ¼ per cent (establishments employing between 20 to 49 workers) is deducted by the employer from the basic wages, dearness allowance (inclusive of cash value of food concessions, if any admissible) and retaining allowances of employees who get Rs. 1,600 per mensem or less as basic wages and who are otherwise eligible for membership of the scheme.  An amount equal to the worker's contribution is contributed by the employer every month. The entire amount is deposited in the State bank of India in the employee provident fund accounts. Under the scheme, provision has been made for the advances under certain conditions to the members for financing life insurance policies, construction of houses, marriage and to defray medical expenses from their share of contribution.

            The number of factories and establishments covered under the Act in the Rupnagar District as on 31 March 1983 was 268. The total number of subscribers to the scheme in the Rupnagar District as on 31 March 1983 was 14,058.

            For the execution of this scheme, the Regional Commissioner, Chandigarh is in charge for the States of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and the Union Territory of Chandigarh. He is assisted by a number of Inspectors in the field who executes government policies.  The employers are required to maintain contributory cards for each employee, in which monthly contributions are recorded. These cards can be seen or inspected at any time.

            Death Relief Fund was started in 1964 for providing timely financial assistance to the nominees/ heirs of the deceased members.  At least Rs. 500 are disbursed as relief. A non-refundable advance is also granted in case of the individual's retrenchment from service.

            Employees' State Insurance Scheme- The Employees' State Insurance Act, 1948 is designed to provide security to the Industrial workers against sickness, maternity, disablement and death due to employment injury, and to provide medical care to insured persons and progressively to their families.  The Act provides protection to the employees working in factories using power and employing 10 or more persons and establishments/ shops not using power and employing 20 or more persons. The employees' State Insurance Scheme was introduced in the Punjab State in 1953.

            A worker who is covered under the scheme is entitled to medical benefits from the day he enters into insurable employment. It consists of free medical treatment in case of sickness, injury and maternity. His family members are also entitled to get free medical care as explained under the Act. Insured women are entitled to get periodical payments in case of confinement, miscarriage or sickness arising out of confinement and premature birth of child. In recent years, the Employees' State Insurance Corporation has been providing additional benefits and protection to the workers suffering from tuberculosis, cancer, leprosy, and mental diseases and also provides artificial limbs.

            In addition to the above, sickness benefit is available to an insured worker in case of certified sickness. It consists of cash payment for a maximum number of 56 days in any continuous period of 365 days. Further if an employment injury results in permanent disablement, the insured person is entitled to permanent disablement, the insured person is entitled to permanent disablement benefit proportionate to the loss of his earning capacity as assessed by the Medical Board constituted for this purpose. Artificial dentures, spectacles and hearing-aids are provided to an insured person where loss to teeth impairment of eye sight and loss or hearing respectively are caused due to employment injury.

            In case of worker's death by accident or industrial injury, benefit is available in the form of pension to his dependents.

            The scheme is administered by a corporate body called the Employees' State Insurance Corporation, which has its headquarters at New Delhi. It is under the administrative control of the Director-General, Employees' State Insurance Corporation, New Delhi. The Scheme is executed in the State through the Regional Director, Employees' State Insurance Corporation, Chandigarh, who inspects factories, collects contribution and arranges payments of cash benefits. The scheme is financed mainly by contributions from employees and employers, with the State Government sharing a part of the cost of medical care.

            In the Rupnagar District, the Scheme is functioning at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar (Mohali) and Kharar. Up to 31 March 1983, there were 7,300 and 2,500 insured persons at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar (Mohali) and Kharar, respectively covered under the scheme.

 

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