(iii)       Dairy Farming

            The main source of supply of milk is the buffalo and the cow, and of these, the buffalo is the principal milk animal. Sheep and goats are also a source, but on account of a low yield, these are of little commercial importance as milch animals. According to the Livestock Census of 1977, the population of cattle can buffaloes in the district was 1,01,600, and 1,79,600 respectively.    

            There is no regular dairy farm in the district, but a large number of people in the village and towns maintain small dairies for supply of milk to the town folk. With milch cattle of good quality, dairy farming can be quite a remunerative occupation. A milk plant has been set up at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar (Mohali) and a Milk Chilling-cum-Demonstration Centre at Village Jhinjri (Tahsil Anandpur Sahib). These facilities have encouraged the growth of dairy farming in the district.

(iv)       Sheep Breeding

            There is no sheep breeding farm in the district, but a number of people in the villages keep sheep and goats. During 1977, the number of sheep and goats in the district was 4,600 and 44,100, respectively.

(v)               Poultry Farming

Of late, interest in poultry framing has increases greatly and many persons have adopted it on scientific lines. The government also advances loans for poultry farming. There is no government poultry farm in the district. According to the livestock Census on 1977, there was 5,08,900 poultry birds in the district. A number of poultry farmers have sprung up in the Kharar area.

(vi)             Piggeries

The pig is one of the most efficient feed coverting animals. It is the only litter bearing animal among meat producing livestock. It has the shortest generation interval and a high feed conversion efficiency. Great emphasis has been laid on pig production. In order to improve the indigenous pigs through cross breeding, a Pig Breeding Farm has been established at Kharar.

To make available wholesome pork and pork products to the consumers, a Pork Processing Plant was also set up by the Government at Kharar. In 1973, this plant was transferred to the Punjab Poultry Corporation, Chandigarh for running it on commercial lines.

In 1977, there were 9,900 pigs in the district.

(vii)           Fisheries

The term fisheries is usually applied to all forms of life in the river and the sea. Fish is a valuable protein as well as vitamins A and B. It is also source of calcium and phosphorus minerals.

The District Fisheries Officer, Rupnagar, is incharge of the fisheries in the district. He is under the administrative control of the Assistant Project Officer (Fisheries) Rupnagar. The District Fisheries Officer is assisted by 3 Fisheries Officers (one each posted at Rupnagar, Nangal and Kharar (Kanaura), 8 Fields Assistants and 10 Fishermen.

The main source of fish in the Rupnagar District is the river Satluj. In 1982-83, the area stocked with fish, seed in the district was 3-.5 hectares which stoked 1,42,00 fish seeds.

There is little scope for pisciculture in the district, as 60 per cent area of the district is sub-mountainous and the ponds do not retain water for the whole year. The different varieties of fish found in the Rupnagar District are mentioned in Chapter I ‘General’ in its section of ‘Fauna’.

(viii)         Animal Diseases and Veterinary Hospitals

Animal Diseases :- The common animal diseases prevalent in the district are gal ghotu (haemorrhagic septicaemia), phar saujan (black quarter), mogh wah (rinderpest), muh-khur (food and mouth disease) and parasite diseases. Of these rinderpest is the most destructive virus disease of clover-footed animals, such as cows, buffaloes, sheep, goats, pigs, etc. The disease is usually spread by contaminated feed and water. Haemorrhagic septicaemia is a very dreadly and most serious infectious disease of cattle and buffaloes. This disease  is mostly prevalent in low lying lands subject to periodical inundation. Black quarter is an acute, infectious and highly fatal disease of cattle. It generally appears during the monsoon season. The foot and mouth disease is a highly contagious disease which attacks cows and buffaloes and breaks out during threshing season of crops. It spreads very commonly by direct contact or indirectly through infected water, manure, hay and pastures. These diseases are controlled by prophylactic vaccination and curative measures. Regular campaigns of inoculation and vaccination against these diseases are conducted by the Animal Husbandry Department.

Veterinary Hospital :-  The prevalence of contagious disease is one of the most serious obstacles in the way of improvement of livestock. In 1982-83 there was a network of 42 veterinary hospitals, 21 permanent veterinary dispensaries, 1 veterinary touring dispensary and 3 artificial insemination cetres in the district. The number of cases treated by these institutions during the same year was 1,21,482. Besides, 2,50,616 vaccination were inoculated to the animals. The number of animals-cows and buffaloes covered by artificial insemination methods during 1982-83, was 11,916 and 1,838 respectively. The list of veterinary hospitals and dispensaries is given in the following table :-

Veterinary Hospital, Permanent Outlying Dispensaries, Veterinary Touring Dispensaries and Artificial Insemination Centres in the  Rupnagar District as on 31 March 1983

Veterinary Hospitals

 

 

Permanent Outlying Dispensaries

Zila Parishal

Panchayat Samiti

Government

Panchayat Samiti

Government

Tahsil Rupnagar

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provincial

Focal Point

 

 

Rupnagar

Singh Bhagwanpur

Mianpur

Thali

Bella

Barsalpur

Morinda

 

Ghanauli

Rolumajra

 

Kheri Salabatpur

Purkhali

 

Manauli

Khant

 

Charrian

Chamkaur Sahib

 

Oind

Haizabad

 

Tajpur

Nangal Sirsa Bharatgarh

 

Surtapur

 

 

 

Tahsil Kharar

 

 

 

 

 

Chuni Kalan

Majri

Mirzapur

Doa Majra

Pannaua

Gharuwan

Landran

 

Mullanpur

Bhago Majra

Manana

Grangan

Kharar

 

 

Manauli

 

Bhabat

Singhpura

 

 

Khizrabad

 

Mataur

 

 

 

Paraul

 

Cholta Kalan

 

 

 

Palheri

 

Karoran Manakpur Shariff Sill

Tashil Anandpur Sahib

 

 

 

 

Anandpur Sahib

 

Dher

Ajauli

Bhanopli

Kotla (Power House)

Nurpur Bedi

 

Bhallan

Kiratpur Sahib

 

Massewal

 

 

Nangal Township

Bhattan

 

Khera Kalmot

 

 

Khanpur Khui

Thakhatgarh

 

Thandian

 

 

Chanauli Bassi

Doomewali

 

Bajrur

 

 

 

Madhopur Abiana

 

 

(  Source  :  District Animal Husbandry  Officer, Rupnagar)

(a)   Forestry

Rupnagar District falls within the jurisdiction of the Divisional Forest Officer, Forest Division, Rupnagar who controls the entire area of Rupnagar District. The Divisional Forest Officer, Rupnagar is assisted by 1 Deputy Divisional Forest Officer, 5 Forest Ranges, 2 Deputy Rangers, 20 Foresters and 76 Forest Guards, 1 Superintendent Grade I, 1 Assistant, 9 Clerks, besides some office staff.

The Forest Department looks after the maintenance and development of  forests for the requirement of agriculture, industry, furniture, timber for building purposes, industrial raw material and firewood as well as protection against soil erosion. Plants  raised along with  rail, road, and canal strips. Nurseries of different species are raises for afforestation and re-afforestation. Plants are also supplied to the public at subsidized rates and technical assistance is given to carry out the plantation work.

(i)         Importance of Forestry in the Economy of the District :-  The forests in the district are mainly confined to the Shivalik foothills. They play a vital role in the conservation of soil and water resources and in stabilising climate conditions. The  trees in this district provide timber, firewood, fodder and some ingredients for medicines.

(ii)        Area under Forests :-  Of the districts in Punjab, area under forests in Rupnagar is the second largest. This area is under protected and unclassed forests as there are no reserved forests in the district. The lands along with the railway strips in the district belonging to the Northern Railways were transferred to the Forest Department for management and declared as Protected Forests in 1954, under the Indian Forest Act. Moreover, the road strips, canals strips and  cho bunds, etc. belonging to Public Works Department were transferred to the Forest Department in 1957 for afforestation and management. All these strips have also been declared protected forests under the Act. With  the construction of more roads, drains, canals, bunds, etc. such area under the control of the Forest Department increases. Additionally the department controls 3,479 hectares of other protected forests. In 1982-83, the area under forests in the district was 6700.88 hectares.

The common shrubs founds in these forests included mallah. zarna, basuti and lantana. Among grasses, bhabbar is commercially the most important. It is used for making paper pulp and ropes. Other grasses found in these forests and palwan, sariala, jheuri, khavi and kahi. These are mainly used as fodder.

The forests in the district may be classified, in terms of the Indian Forests Act as under :-

Protected Forests

            These forests include all road strips, rail strips, canal strips, cho-bunds and many blocks of forest, declared as Protected Forests by the State Government. Among these forest blocks, the area under Naurang Pur forest block is the largest (423 hectares). The area under other forest blocks ranges between 2 hectares and 362 hectares. These are mainly man made forests and comprise such trees as shisham, kikar, eucalyptus, khair, chhal, jhingan and mango. During 1982-83, the area under these forests in the district was 5546.22 hectares.

Unclassed Forests

            These are newly acquired areas, transferred to the Forest Department by the Rehabilitation Department, during 1971-72. These are stocked with shisham, kikar. and chhal, etc. During 1982-83, the area under unclassed forests in the district was 1154.66 hectares.

            The area under forests in the district, as on 31 March 1983 was as under :-

 

Particulars

 

Area in hectares

(i)

Reserved Forests

 

-

(ii)

Protected Forests

 

5,546.22

 

   Rail strips

284.20

 

 

   Road strips

411.47

 

 

   Canal strips

1,371.55

 

 

Other protected Forests

3,479.00

 

(iii)

Unclassed Forests

 

1,154.66

 

Total

 

6,700.88

            (iii)       Forest Produce :-  The major items of forest produce are timber and firewood and the minor items are katha, grasses, fruits, flowers and leaves. The annual income realised by the department from sale of  forest produce in the year from 1973-74 to 1982-83 was as under :-

 

 

Year

Major Produce

(Rs.)

Minor Produce

(Rs.)

1973-74

4,79,641

90,073

1974-75

6,41,451

1,18,912

1975-76

3,85,190

1,49,527

1976-77

4,62,167

1,35,049

1977-78

4,30,205

1,86.026

1978-79

3,85,348

2,01,324

1979-80

6,51,730

1,60,800

1980-81

6,51,460

1,91,457

1981-82

3,09,650

1,39,975

1982-83

3,89,760

2,34,67

(  Source  :  Divisional Forest Officer, Rupnagar Division, Rupnagar)

(f) Floods

            The causes of soil erosion and flooding in Rupnagar District have been explained in Chapter I ‘General’. Floods have frequently been causing  damage to crops and property, most recently in the years 1973, and from 1975 to 1978.

            To check the problems of flooding, three subdivisions of the Drainage Department are working in the district. The main functions of these subdivisions are to assess the drainage and floods control problems, to save the area of the district from floods and to execute flood control works on nadies/khads.

            The Drainage Department has canalised the Kandlu and Midhwan Khads. Lotan and Charan Ganga Khada have been provided with bunds on both sides. In addition, local flood protection work in the other khads and chos have been executed and about 130 km long bunds have been constructed. A bund has also been provided on the banks of Siswan Nadi. During the rainy season, flood control rooms are established  to communicate information and to initiate prompt action to provide relief. In addition, refreshers flood training camps, courses, etc. are arranged at regular intervals.

            The damage caused by flood and heavy rains in the period from 1969 to 1982 is shown in the following table :-

Damage caused to private property and area under crops, produce and its value due to floods during, rainy season in the Rupnagar District, 1969 to 1982

Year

Number of villages/

affected

Area affected (sq.km.)

Number of human lives lost

Number of cattle heads lost

Number of houses damaged

Damage of Crops

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area affected (hecters)

Produce damaged

(‘00’ qtls)

Value

(‘000’Rs)

1969

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1970

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1971

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1972

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1973

70

23

-

-

-

2,312

216

2,015

1974

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1975

44

12

-

1

157

1,182

-

1,921

1976

26

9

2

18

1,575

0926

-

1,706

1977

7

(a)

2

29

2

5

-

66

1978

94

33

-

59

6,453

2,353

-

3,153

1979

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1980

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1981

10

-

-

7

135

-

-

-

1982

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(a) Negligible                                        ( Statistical Abstracts of Punjab, 1970 to 1983 )

APPENDIX

(Vide page 130)

Area under principal crops in Rupangar District 1973-74 to 1982-83

 

Crops

1973-74

1978-79

1979-80

1980-81

1981-82

1982-83

Cereals

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rice

8

15

17

22

21

21

Wheat

63

67

70

72

76

75

Bajra

0.2

0.9

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.1

Maize

37

33

37

36

37

32

Jowar

0.3

0.2

0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

Barley

1,5

3.3

1.2

1.0

3

3.2

Pulses

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gram

21

20

13

13

4

1

Moong

0.01

0.09

0.11

0.02

0.02

0.01

Mash

3.6

2.28

3.23

2.54

2.12

1.40

Massar

1.43

1.31

1.31

1.43

2.11

1.85

Oil Seeds

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ground nut

10

7.5

6.1

4.1

4.3

3.9

Rape and Mustard

2.9

1.2

1.1

1.1

1.6

1.7

Sesamum

2

0.9

1.1

1.7

1.9

0.9

Linseed

0.1

0.1

(a)

0.1

0.1

0.1

Other Crops

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sugarcane

10

14

12

10

10

10

Cotton American

0.1

(a)

0.4

0.1

(a)

(a)

Cotton desi

2

1.5

1.2

2.1

1.7

2.3

Potatoes

1.4

2.8

1.6

2

1.7

1.2

Dry Chillies

0.25

0.08

0.45

0.27

0.10

0.12

(  Statistical Abstracts of Punjab, 1974 to 1983)

(a)    Denotes less than 50 hectares.

APPENDIX II

(Vide page 130)

Production of Principal crops in Rupnagar District 1973-74 to 1982-83

 

 

 

 

 

(thousand          metric            tons)

Crops

1973-74

1978-79

1979-80

1980-81

1981-82

1982-83

Cereals

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rice

17

39

37

72

52

72

Wheat

118

171

177

158

163

208

Bajra

-

1

-

-

-

-

Maize

54

36

58

46

64

36

Jowar

0.2

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

Barley

1

7

2

3

5

5

Pulses

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gram

13

16

6

4

4

(c)

Moong

(b)

(b)

0.1

-

-

-

Mash

15

1.4

1.2

1.4

0.7

0.6

Massar

0.52

0.9

0.7

0.8

0.8

0.7

Oil Seeds

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ground nut

7

6

3

4

3

2

Rape and Mustard

2

1

1

1

1

1

Seasmum

0.6

0.4

0.3

0.5

0.5

0.3

Linseed

0.1

-

-

-

-

-

Other Crops

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sugarcane

57

86

72

56

56

63

Cotton American

0.02

-

-

-

-

-

Cotton Desi

0.36

0.25

0.19

0.32

0.42

0.40

Potatoes

16.8

63.04

34.2

42

37.8

23.4

Dry Chillies

0.19

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.1

(  Statistical Abstracts of Punjab, 1974 to 1983  )

(b)   Denotes less than 50 metric tons.

(c)    Denotes less than 500 metric tons.

 

CHAPTER V

INDUSTRIES

(a) Traditional Industries and industrial Development :- Rupnagar has been primarily an agricultural district, its industries confined to the village and cottage sectors. The traditional industry included pottery work, leather tanning, handloom weaving, shoe-making and  phulkari embroidering. Most of these trades, however, have for various reasons been gradually decaying.

Lock making at Rupnagar has also been important old time industry of the district. Locks made in Rupnagar were famous all over the country. After the migration of Muslim artisans to Pakistan in 1947, this industry also declined.

In recent years, some agro based industries were also set up in the areas forming parts of the present district of Rupnagar. Kurali being a cotton marked, a cotton ginning and oil-seed crushing unit was established there during 1912. Thereafter, four more cotton ginning factories were started at Kharar, Rupnagar, Morinda and Khanpur.

Anandpur was once famous for shoe-making. The shoes were of excellent quality and were sold in Lahore, Amritsar, Delhi and Calcutta. A small quantity of dyed leather and quill work, such as boxes, cigar cases, etc. were also made at Anandpur by a few families, the women embroidering the patterns in strips of peacock quills. This work was probably of Nepalese origin. The manufactured articles were similar to those from Bilaspur (Himachal Pradesh) and other places in the hills.

A wolled mill set up at Kharar in 1944 by a partnership firm was later converted into a public limited company. Its products such as worsted yarn, woollen yarn, blankets, etc. found a marked in the towns of Ludhiana, Amritsar, Panipat, Srinagar, Kanpur and Delhi, and were also sold in the state of Rajasthan.

The other traditional small scale industries which continue in the district are ban making, munj matting, mats of date palm, etc. Though more and more land has been brought under plough, adequate supply of raw material – munj and bhabbar grass grown at the foot of the hills is still available. The design of the matting and of the ban has not undergone change, although the methods of manufacture have improved. Hand made goods have been substituted by machine made goods.

After the partition of the country in 1947, the district has seen considerable industrial progress. Industrial units have sprung up at Anandpur Sahib, Nangal, Morinda, Kharar, Rupnagar and Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar. These include sugar mills and units for manufacture of tractors, television sets, steel tubes, cotton textile, fertilizers, electrical appliances, rubber goods, heavy water and some other items. Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar (Mohali) in partucular has emerged an important production point in the district. The town was sponsored by the government as a centre for industrial growth.

(b) State Aid to Industries

The policy of the Government is to encourage industrial growth. The facilities provided to entrepreneurs include concession in electricity duty, exemption of industrial units from property tax, allotment of slack coal, cement and bricks to the new units, allotment of adequate land and advance of loans on liberal terms through public and financial institutions. The Industries Department provides technical guidance for starting new industries and also imparts industrial training in various institutions.

The Department of Industries continues to provide financial assistance in the form of loans and subsidies under the provisions of the Punjab State Aid of Industries Act, 1935, for the development of industries. Besides, Commercial Banks provide industries with working capital and other financial aid.

Some other measures taken for the promotion of industries in the district are discussed below:-

(1)Supply of Machinery on Hire-Purchase Basis :-The scheme was started in 1971-72 to assist the entrepreneurs in the procurement of indigenously built machinery on the hire-purchase basis and to save them from liabilities involved in the lump sum investment. This scheme in operated through the Punjab State Small Industries Corporation. All educated unemployed persons are eligible under this scheme. The advance for machinery for a single small scale unit is limited Rs. 50,000. The amount is recoverable in half yearly installments ranging from 9 to 13.

(2) Assistance to Education Unemplyment :- A scheme Training for Self Employment was started in 1974-75 by the Government. Under this scheme, entrepreneurial training is imparted to unemployed educated persons including engineers, skilled operators, factory employees, technicians, craftsmen, war-widows and ex-servicemen, desirous of taking up self employment in industrial / commercial enterprises. The aim of the training is to enable the beneficiaries to prepare their projects for securing financial advances, and to enable them to run their business efficiently. The duration of the training is three months. Stipends are paid by the Government to the trainees.

(3) Interest Subsidy :-  Unemployed engineers and technically qualified entrepreneurs are provided subsidy in interest payable on loans takes by such entrepreneurs from banks or the Punjab Financial Corporation, for the purchase of land, building and machinery. After 1974, the interest charged is only 7 per cent, the difference between this rate and the bank rate being the Government subsidy.

(4) Allotment of Built up Factory Sheds :-  Industrial Estates have been established at various places in the State where sheds are allotted for setting up industries,. The allotment is made by the Director of Industries, Punjab, on the recommendation of the allotment committee headed by the Director of Industries. Each shed is allotted on  lease hold basis for a period of 99 years which may be renewable for another 99 years. One such Industrial Estates had been established at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar.

(5) Other Organizations for the Development of Industries :-

The following organizations work for the promotion of industries :

(i) The Punjab Small-Scale Industries Co-operation :- The Corporation was started by the State Government in 1982 primarily to aid, counsel, finance, protect and promote small scale units in the State. The main functions of the Corporation comprise procurement, storage and distribution of raw material, whether imported or indigenous. The raw material are distributed to those industries whose names are recommended by the Director of Industries, Punjab, Chandigarh, through its offices opened in various towns, The supply of raw material to the small-scale units of the Rupnagar District in provided from the Corporations depot at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar. As on 30 November 1985, the Corporation supplied iron and steel to 135 units in the district. The Corporation also assists the producers to market their goods.

(ii) The Punjab State Industrial Development Corporation, Chandigarh :- The Punjab State Industrial Development Corporation Limited was incorporated on 31 January 1966, with the objective of promoting industries in the medium and large scale sectors. It had set up a number of projects in the Public sector as well as in the joint sector. The Corporation pilots industrial projects through the various stages, completing in time the formalities starting with investigation of projects and bringing fhem to the point of operation.

The Corporation has also been acting as a financial institution. For projects with capital cost exceeding Rs 50 lakhs but below Rs. 200 lakhs and paid up capital and reserves and not exceeding Rs. 250 lakhs, the Corporation extends term loan assistance up to Rs 60 lakhs under the Industrial Development Bank of India Refinance Scheme. In addition, it also extends the facility of direct subscription / underwriting to the extent of 15 per cent of the share capital of the company provided the project is found to be technically feasible and economically viable.

Since its inception, the Corporation has set up as many as 18 projects in Rupnagar District upto 30 September 1985. The new units manufacture items such as tractors, dry cell batteries, television sets and precision measuring instruments. The projects promoted in the public and joint sector, involved a total capital outlay of Rs. 11,955.26 lakhs and had generated direct employment for 12,468 persons, In addition, 4 projects involving a capital outlay of Rs. 2,085 lakhs were in various stages of implementation on the said date. The new projects had been set up to manufacture television tubes and cathedik ray tubes, data acquisition systems, telephone instruments, single super phosphate, etc. and generate additional employment for about 2,110 persons. Further, four projects are being set up in the district involving a capital outlay of Rs. 8,905 lakhs These projects are at the stage in investigation. These would manufacture coloured picture tubes, low power generators / high power generators valves and regulators, diesel engines, typewriters, etc. and are expected to generate employment for about 2,850 people,

(iii) The Punjab Financial Corporation, Chandigarh :-  This corporation was established in 1953 under the State Financial Corporation Act, 1951, with object of providing medium and long term loans to industrial concerns located in the State. The Corporation advances loans between Rs. 10 lakhs and Rs. 15 Lakhs to all types of units. For public limited companies and co-operative societies, the limit of advance is Rs. 30 lakhs.

The Corporation also finances transporters. The holders of route permit and even those who hold a certificate of eligibility for holding such permit are granted loans for the acquisition of new / old vehicles. The Corporation also extends advances to industrial entrepreneurs to purchase their own generating sets to enable them to meet the shortage of electric power.

 

 

(iv) The Punjab Export Corporation Limited, Chandigarh :- This Corporation was initially started in 1963 to organize export of all such goods as were manufactured or could be procured from within the State. The Corporation assists the industrial units in finding exports markets for their products. Financial help in the form of advance is provided to execute export orders channelized through the Corporation.

(c) Industrial Training

            In an industrially developing economy, industrial training plays a vital role in ensuring adequacy of technicians and skilled workers. Additionally, the Industrial Training Centres help to generate employment for technicians.

            The Department of Industrial Training is engaged in producing technicians in various trades, including those relation to engineering, non-engineering and to certain specialized trades. The department is engaged in the implementation of such schemes as craftsman training, apprenticeship training and special training in Industrial Schools. Besides, special training centres had been started to train the children belonging to the Scheduled Castes and the Backward Classes in various engineering and non-engineering trades.

            Industrial Training Instituted at Rupnagar and Nangal impart technical training in engineering and non-engineering trades. The are also five Industrial Schools for Girls at Anandput Sahib, Rupnagar, Nangal Morinda and Kharar. These schools impart training in tailoring and cutting, needle work and embroidery. Besides, there is an Industrial School at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar which imparts two years’ training in electronics, radio and television mechanics, and also dreftsmanship in addtion to one year training in Punjabi stenography, tailoring and cutting, needle work and embroidery. Apart from these, there is a Training-cim-Procution Centre for embroidery work at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar. A Government Industrial Institute at Nangal arranges evening Classes for Industrial workers.

            The particulars of the different Government Training Institutes in the district are given in the following statement :-

 

GOVERNMENT  TRAINING INSTITUTE IN THE RUPNAGAR DISTRICT

Number of seats sanctioned Trade-wise with effect from session starting during August 1983

 

 

S.No

Name and Location of Institute

Engineering Trades

                        Non-Engineering Trades

 

 

 

Two year’s duration           One year duration                 One year duration

 

 

 

Name of Trade

No. of Seats

Name of Trade

No. of Seats

Name of Trade

No. of Seats

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

 

1.

Industrial Training Institute,

Fitter

32

Welder (Gas and Electric)

12

Stenography

(Punjabi)

32

 

 

Rupnagar

Turner

24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Machinist (Composite)

24

Carpenter

 

Book Binding

16

 

 

 

Mechanic Motor Vehicle

32

Mechanic Tractor

16

 

 

 

 

Electrician

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanic Instrument

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draftsman (Civil)

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surveyor

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanic Radio and T.V

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Electronics

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Industrial Training, Institute,

Fitter

64

Welder (Gas and Electric)

36

Stenography (English)

32

 

Nangal

Turner

24

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanist (Grinder)

24

Sheet Metal Worker

16

Stenography (Punjabi)

16

 

 

Mechanist (Composite)

48

Moulder Carpenter

16

Accountancy

16

 

 

Wireman

32

Plumber

32

 

 

 

 

Mechanic Motor Vehicle

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

Electrician

64

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draftsman (Mechanical)

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical Refrigerator and Air Conditioning

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.

Government Industrial School

Electronics

32

 

 

Stenography (Punjabi)

16

 

for Girls Sahibzada Ajit Singh

Draftsman (Civil)

32

 

 

Taioloring and Cutting

32

 

Nagar

Mechanic Radio and T.V

32

 

 

Embroidery & Needle work

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.

Government Indusrial School

 

 

 

 

Taioloring and Cutting

32

 

for Girls, Rupnagar

 

 

 

 

Embroidery & Needle work

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.

Government Industrial School

 

 

 

 

Teachers’ Training Course

40

 

for girls Anandpur Sahib

 

 

 

 

Stenography (Punjabi)

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taioloring and Cutting

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embroidery & Needle work

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.

Government Industrial School

 

 

 

 

Stenography (Punjabi)

16

 

for Girls, Nangal

 

 

 

 

Taioloirn and Cutting

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embroidery & Needle work

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.

Government Industrial School

 

 

 

 

Taioloirn and Cutting

32

 

for Girls, Morinda

 

 

 

 

Embroidery & Needle work

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.

Government Industrial School

 

 

 

 

Taioloirn and Cutting

32

 

for Girls, Kharar

 

 

 

 

Embroidery & Needle work

32

 

(Source            : Director of Technical Education and Industrial Training, Punjab, Chandigarh)

(d) Industrial Estates and Industrial Development Colony

            In order to create a favourable climate for attracting industrial projects in the State, The Government had demarcated certain areas as Focal Points or Industrial Estates for industrial growth. In these places, a package of concessions is provided. These include basic infrastructure, a holiday from sales tax, an exemption from electricity duty and price preference in purchases of finished products by Government departments.  For popularising the scheme of industrial estates/focal points, sheds are given to allottees on installments and on hire purchase basis.  One such ‘Focal Point’ is at Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar.  Three phases of the town are included in the focal points.  These are:

(i) Industrial Phase VI :- This phase comprises 123 acres and had also been developed by the Punjab State Small Industries Corporation. The main industrial activities in this Phase are Punj-Star Television, Raja Ram Starch Factory, Milk Plant, Steel Tubes, etc.

(ii) Industrial Phase VII :- The phase measuring about 394 acres has been developed by the Punjab State Small Industries Corporation. It includes 188 plots measuring between 25 acres and 5 acres in area. The Punjab Acumeasures Limited, Punjab Semi Conductor Devices and Electronics Components Limited are the Joint Government Collaboration sector units which have begun production.

(iii) Electronics Phase VIII :-  This comprises about 287 acres. A big 50 acres Semi-Conductor Complex in the central public sector is a part of this phase.

            The total number of sheds carved in these phases is 438, of which 412 had been allotted.

 

 

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